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1September 1784 (Washington Papers)
Having found it indispensably necessary to visit my Landed property west of the Apalacheon Mountains, and more especially that part of it which I held in Co-partnership with Mr. Gilbert Simpson —Having determined upon a tour into that Country, and having made the necessary preparations for it, I did, on the first day of this month (September) set out on my journey. Having dispatched my...
2[Diary entry: 1 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
Having found it indispensably necessary to visit my Landed property west of the Apalacheon Mountains, and more especially that part of it which I held in Co-partnership with Mr. Gilbert Simpson —Having determined upon a tour into that Country, and having made the necessary preparations for it, I did, on the first day of this month (September) set out on my journey. Having dispatched my...
3[Diary entry: 2 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
Sep. 2. About 5 Oclock we set out from Shepperds; and leaving the Baggage to follow slowly on, we arrived about 11 Oclock ourselves at Leesburgh, where we Dined. The Baggage having joined we proceeded to Mr. Israel Thompsons & lodged makg. abt. 36 M. Dinner was at Thomas Roper’s ordinary (Cash Memoranda, DLC:GW ). Israel Thompson (d. 1795), a Quaker, lived on a 700–acre plantation in the...
4[Diary entry: 3 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
3d. Having business to transact with my Tenants in Berkeley; & others, who were directed to meet me at my Brother’s (Colo. Charles Washington’s), I left Doctr. Craik and the Baggage to follow slowly, and set out myself about Sun rise for that place—where after Breakfasting at Keys’s ferry I arrived about 11 Oclock—distant abt. 17 Miles. Colo. Warner Washington, Mr. Wormeley, Genl. Morgan, Mr....
5[Diary entry: 4 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
4th. Having finished my business with my Tenants (so far at least as partial payments could put a close to it) and provided a waggon for the transportation of my Baggage to the Warm springs (or Town of Bath) to give relief to my Horses, which from the extreme heat of the weather began to rub & gaul, I set out after dinner, and reached Captn. Stroads a Substantial farmers betwn. Opeckon Creek &...
6[Diary entry: 5 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
5th. Dispatched my Waggon (with the Baggage) at day light; and at 7 Oclock followed it. Bated at one Snodgrasses, on Back Creek and dined there; About 5 Oclock P.M. we arrived at the Springs, or Town of Bath—after travelling the whole day through a drizling rain, 30 Miles. Robert Snodgrass ran the tavern which his father, William Snodgrass, an emigrant from Scotland, had built on Back Creek...
7[Diary entry: 6 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
6th. Remained at Bath all day and was shewed the Model of a Boat constructed by the ingenious Mr. Rumsey, for ascending rapid currents by mechanism; the principles of this were not only shewn, & fully explained to me, but to my very great satisfaction, exhibited in practice in private, under the injunction of Secresy, untill he saw the effect of an application he was about to make to the...
8[Diary entry: 8 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
8th. Set out about 7 oclock with the Doctr. (Craik) his Son William, and my Nephew Bushrod Washington; who were to make the tour with us. About ten I parted with them at 15 Miles Creek, & recrossed the Potomack (having passed it abt. 3 Miles from the Springs before) to a tract of mine on the Virginia side which I find exceedingly rich, & must be very valuable. The lower end of the Land is rich...
9[Diary entry: 9 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
9th. Having discharged the hired Horses which were obtained at the Springs, & hired one more only to supply the place of one of mine, whose back was much hurt, we had them loaded by Six oclock, and was about to set out when it began to rain; which looking very likely to continue thro’ the day, I had the Loads taken of to await the issue. At this place I met with a Man who lives at the Mouth of...
10[Diary entry: 10 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
10th. Set off a little after 5 Oclock altho’ the morning was very unpromissing. Finding from the rains that had fallen, and description of the Roads, part of which between the old Town & this place (old Fort Cumberland) we had passed, that the progress of my Baggage would be tedeous, I resolved (it being Necessary) to leave it to follow; and proceed on myself to Gilbert Simpson’s, to prepare...
11[Diary entry: 11 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
11th. Set out at half after 5 oclock from Tumbersons, & in about 1½ Miles came to what is called the little crossing of Yohiogany—the road not bad. This is a pretty considerable water and, as it is said to have no fall in it, may, I conceive, be improved into a valuable navigation; and from every Acct. I have yet been able to obtain, communicates nearest with the No. Branch of Potomack of any...
12[Diary entry: 12 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
12th. Left Daughertys about 6 Oclock, stopped a while at the Great Meadows, and viewed a tenament I have there, which appears to have been but little improved, tho capable of being turned to great advantage, as the whole of the ground called the Meadows may be reclaimed at an easy comparitive expence & is a very good stand for a Tavern. Much Hay may be cut here when the ground is laid down in...
13[Diary entry: 13 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
13th. I visited my Mill, and the several tenements on this Tract (on which Simpson lives). I do not find the Land in general equal to my expectation of it. Some part indeed is as rich as can be, some other part is but indifferent—the levellest is the coldest, and of the meanest quality—that which is most broken, is the richest; tho’ some of the hills are not of the first quality. The...
14[Diary entry: 14 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
14th. Remained at Mr. Gilbert Simpsons all day. Before Noon Colo. Willm. Butler and the Officer Commanding the Garrison at Fort Pitt, a Captn. Lucket came here. As they confirmed the reports of the discontented temper of the Indians and the Mischiefs done by some parties of them and the former advised me not to prosecute my intended trip to the Great Kanhawa, I resolved to decline it. This day...
15[Diary entry: 15 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
15th. This being the day appointed for the Sale of my moiety of the Co-partnership stock—Many People were gathered (more out of curiosity I believe than from other motives) but no great Sale made. My Mill I could obtain no bid for, altho I offered an exemption from the payment of Rent 15 Months. The Plantation on which Mr. Simpson lives rented well—Viz. for 500 Bushels of Wheat payable at any...
16[Diary entry: 16 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
16th. Continued at Simpsons all day—in order to finish the business which was begun yesterday. Gave leases to some of my Ten[an]ts on the Land whereon I now am. GW’s tract at Washington’s Bottom contained, besides Simpson’s 600–acre plantation and the mill tract, five small farms leased to tenants whose names and length of tenure are not fully clear ( Thomas Freeman to GW, 18 Dec. 1786 ,...
17[Diary entry: 17 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
17th. Detained here by a settled Rain the whole day—which gave me time to close my accts. with Gilbert Simpson, & put a final end to my Partnership with him. Agreed this day with a Major Thomas Freeman to superintend my business over the Mountains, upon terms to be inserted in his Instructions. “I do not expect,” GW had written Simpson 10 July 1784 , “to be compensated for my losses, nor mean...
18[Diary entry: 18 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
18th. Set out with Doctr. Craik for my Land on Millers run (a branch of Shurtees [Chartier’s] Creek). Crossed the Monongahela at Deboirs Ferry—16 Miles from Simpsons —bated at one Hamiltons about 4 Miles from it, in Washington County, and lodged at a Colo. Cannons on the Waters of Shurtees Creek—a kind hospitable Man; & sensible. Most of the Land over which we passed was hilly—some of it very...
19[Diary entry: 19 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
19th. Being Sunday, and the People living on my Land, apparently very religious, it was thought best to postpone going among them till tomorrow —but rode to a Doctr. Johnsons who had the Keeping of Colo. Crawfords (Surveying) records—but not finding him at home was disappointed in the business which carried me there. These settlers were members of the Associate Presbyterian Church, commonly...
20[Diary entry: 20 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
20th. Went early this Morning to view my Land, & to receive the final determination of those who live upon it. Having obtained a Pilot near the Land I went first to the plantation of Samuel McBride, who has about 5 Acres of Meadow & 30 of arable Land under good fencing—a Logged dwelling house with a punchion roof, & stable, or small barn, of the same kind—the Land rather hilly, but good,...
21[Diary entry: 21 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
21st. Accompanied by Colo. Cannon & Captn. Swearingin who attended me to Debores ferry on the Monongahela which seperates the Counties of Fayette & Washington, I returned to Gilbert Simpson’s in the Afternoon; after dining at one Wickermans Mill near the Monongahela. Colo. Cannon, Captn. Sweringin & Captn. Richie all promised to hunt up the Evidences which could prove my possession &...
22[Diary entry: 22 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
22d. After giving instructions to Major Thomas Freeman respecting his conduct in my business, and disposing of my Baggage which was left under the care of Mr. Gilbert Simpson—consisting of two leather & one linnen Valeses with my Marquee & horseman’s Tent Tent Poles & Pins—all my bedding except Sheets (which I take home with me)—the equipage Trunk containing all that was put into it except the...
23[Diary entry: 23 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
23d. Arrived at Colo. Philips abt. five oclock in the afternoon 16 Miles from Beason Town & near the Mouth of Cheat Rivr. The land thro’ wch. I rid was for the most part tolerably level—in some places rich—but in general of a second quality. Crossed no water of consequence except Georges Creek. An Apology made to me from the Court of Fayette (thro’ Mr. Smith) for not addressing me; as they...
24[Diary entry: 24 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
24th. And crossed it at the Mouth, as it was thought the river was too much swelled to attempt the ford a little higher up. The fork was about 2 Miles & half from Colo. Philups, & the ground betwn. very hilly tho’ rich in places. The Cheat at the Mouth is about 125 yds. wide—the Monongahela near dble. that. The colour of the two Waters is very differt., that of Cheat is dark (occasioned as is...
25[Diary entry: 25 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
25th. Having obtained the foregoing information, and being indeed some what discouraged from the acct. given of the passage of the Cheat river through the Laurel hill and also from attempting to return by the way of the Dunkers bottom, as the path it is said is very blind, & exceedingly grown up with briers, I resolved to try the other rout, along the New road to Sandy Creek; & thence by...
26[Diary entry: 26 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
26th. Having found our Horses readily (for they nevr. lost sight of our fire) we started at the dawning of day, and passing along a small path much enclosed with weeds and bushes, loaded with water from the overnights rain, & the showers which were continually falling, we had an uncomfortable travel to one Charles friends, about 10 Miles; where we could get nothing for our horses, and only...
27[Diary entry: 27 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
27th. I left Mr. Logston’s a little after day-break. At 4 Miles thro’ bad road, occasioned by Stone, I crossed the Stony River; which, as hath been before observed, appears larger than the No. Branch. At ten Miles I had by an imperceptible rise, gained the summit of the Alligany Mountain and began to desend it where it is very steep and bad to the waters of Pattersons Creek which embraces...
28[Diary entry: 28 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
28th. Remained at Colo. Hite’s all day to refresh myself and rest my Horses, having had a very fatieguing journey thro’ the Mountains, occasioned not more from the want of accomodation & the real necessaries of life than the showers of Rain which were continually falling & wetting the bushes—the passing of which, under these circumstances was very little better than swimming of rivulets. From...
29[Diary entry: 29 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
29th. Having appointed to join Doctr. Craik and my Baggage at Colo. Warner Washington’s, but finding it required only one day more to take the rout of Mr. Thos. Lewis’s (near Stanton) from whose Office I wanted some papers to enable me to prosecute my ejectments of those who had possessed themselves of my Land in the County of Washington, State of Pensylvania; and that I might obtain a more...
30[Diary entry: 30 September 1784] (Washington Papers)
30th. Set out early—Captn. Hite returning home and travelled 11 or 12 Miles along the River, until I had passed thro’ the gap. Then bearing more westerly by one Bryan’s —the widow Smiths and one Gilberts, I arrived at Mr. Lewis’s about Sundown, after riding about 40 Miles—leaving Rockingham C[our]t House to my right about 2 Miles. From Brocks Gap, GW rode southwest for several miles along the...
31[October 1784] (Washington Papers)
October 1st. Dined at Mr. Gabriel Jones’s, not half a mile from Mr. Lewis’s, but seperated by the South fork of Shannondoah; which is between 80 and a hundred yards wide, & makes a respectable appearance altho’ little short of 150 Miles from its confluence with Potomack River; and only impeded in its navigation by the rapid water & rocks which are between the old bloomery and Keys’s ferry; and...
32[Diary entry: 1 October 1784] (Washington Papers)
October 1st. Dined at Mr. Gabriel Jones’s, not half a mile from Mr. Lewis’s, but seperated by the South fork of Shannondoah; which is between 80 and a hundred yards wide, & makes a respectable appearance altho’ little short of 150 Miles from its confluence with Potomack River; and only impeded in its navigation by the rapid water & rocks which are between the old bloomery and Keys’s ferry; and...
33[Diary entry: 2 October 1784] (Washington Papers)
2d. I set off very early from Mr. Lewis’s who accompanied me to the foot of the blew ridge at Swift run gap, 10 Miles, where I bated and proceeded over the Mountain. Dined at a pitiful house 14 Miles further where the roads to Fredericksburgh (by Orange C[our]t House) & that to Culpeper Court House fork. Took the latter, tho in my judgment Culpeper Court House was too much upon my right for a...
34[Diary entry: 3 October 1784] (Washington Papers)
3d. Left Quarters before day, and breakfasted at Culpeper Court house which was estimated 21 Miles, but by bad direction I must have travelled 25, at least. Crossed Normans ford 10 Miles from the Court Ho[use] and lodged at Captn. John Ashbys occasioned by other bad directions, which took me out of the proper road, which ought to have been by Elk run Church 3 or 4 Miles to the right. GW took...
35[Diary entry: 4 October 1784] (Washington Papers)
4th. Notwithstanding a good deal of rain fell in the night and the continuance of it this morning (which lasted till about 10 Oclock) I breakfasted by Candlelight, and Mounted my horse soon after day break; and having Captn. Ashby for a guide thro’ the intricate part of the Road (which ought, tho’ I missed it, to have been by Prince William old Court Ho[use]) I arrived at Colchester, 30 Miles,...
36January 1785 (Washington Papers)
First Monday. Colo. Bassett, who brought his daughter Fanny to this place to remain on the 24th. of last Month set off on his return to the Assembly now sitting at Richmond. I took a ride to my Plantations in the Neck, & called to see my neighbour Humphrey Peake who has been long afflicted with ill health and appears to be in the last stage of life & very near his end. Wind Southwardly. The...
37[Diary entry: 1 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
First Monday. Colo. Bassett, who brought his daughter Fanny to this place to remain on the 24th. of last Month set off on his return to the Assembly now sitting at Richmond. I took a ride to my Plantations in the Neck, & called to see my neighbour Humphrey Peake who has been long afflicted with ill health and appears to be in the last stage of life & very near his end. Wind Southwardly. The...
38[Diary entry: 2 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 2d. Doctr. Craik came here to Dinner & stayed all Night. Drizzly Morning which first turned to rain, & then to snow.
39[Diary entry: 3 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Monday 3d. Doctr. Stuart—his wife Betcy & Patcy Custis who had been here since the 27th. ulto. returned home. Doctr. Craik visited Mr. Peake & returned to Dinner. While we were at Dinner Colo. Blackburne & his daughter Sally came. The whole remained the Evening. Variable & very squally weather with Snow & Sunshine alternately. Towards evening the Wind came from the No. West & blew violently....
40[Diary entry: 4 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 4th. Colo. Blackburne went to Alexandria leaving his daughter here. Doctr. Craik attempted to cross the river at my Ferry, but failing on acct. of the Ice returned, & stayed dinner & the evening. Wind variable & cold.
41[Diary entry: 5 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 5th. The Doctr. in vain attempted my ferry & being disappointed went to George Town with a view of crossing on the Ice. Colo. Blackburn returned this Evening from Alexandria. Wind Northwardly & cold.
42[Diary entry: 6 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Thursday 6th. Colo. Blackburn & his daughter left this after breakfast. Wind from the Southwest, raw, cold & disagreeable.
43[Diary entry: 7 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Friday 7th. Road to my Mill, Ferry, Dogue run, & Muddy hole Plantations. Preparing my dry well, and the Well in my New Cellar for the reception of Ice. But little wind, and that Southwardly. Day very pleasant—tho’ it thawed but little. The well in the new cellar was to prove unsatisfactory (see entry for 5 June ). The dry well that GW used as an icehouse was first mentioned in 1773, when it...
44[Diary entry: 8 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Saturday 8th. Drawing Ice from the river to my well in the Cellar—got it ¾ full & well pounded, as it was thrown in. Wind pretty fresh from the Southwest. The little Snow, not exceeding 2 Inches with which the ground was covered began to disappear and the ground to soften very much. The day for the greater part was lowering & variable.
45[Diary entry: 9 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Sunday 9th. Not much wind, and that at West, & So. West. Moderate & thawing a little. The Mercury in the Thermometer was at 32 this afternoon. Appearances of Rain.
46[Diary entry: 10 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Monday 10th. Mercury at Sun rise was at 38—at Noon the same and at Night 42. Drizzly all day with but little wind—that westerly. Made a finish of the Ice in my well in the Cellar and began to fill the dry well—but the Ice unexpectedly leaving the Shore was obliged to quit. But little thawing to day, notwithstanding the wind & weather.
47[Diary entry: 11 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Tuesday 11th. Mercury at 38 in the Morning 40 at Noon & 44 at Night. Until Noon it was foggy, with but little wind. Afternoon it cleared, & was very pleasant. The wind pretty fresh from the So. West—which bringing the Ice to the Shore again I renewed the Work of filling my dry Well with it by assembly Carts & hands from my Plantations.
48[Diary entry: 12 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Wednesday 12th. Mercury at 42 in the Morning—40 at Noon & 38 at Night. Morning very fine with but little Wind from the So. Wt. At 10 o’clock it shifted to the No. Wt. blew very hard & turned Cold. Road to my Mill Swamp, where my Dogue run hands were at work & to other places in search of the sort of Trees I shall want for my walks, groves, & Wildernesses. At the Sein Landing & between that &...
49[Diary entry: 13 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Thursday 13th. Mercury in the Thermomiter at 26 about Sunrise—30 at Noon & 32 at Night. Morning clear & cold, the Wind being fresh from the No. West, Which, about Noon, died away and grew moderate. Was envited, & went to the Funeral of Mr. Peake who died on Tuesday night. Returned to Dinner, accompanied by the Revd. Doctr. Griffith. Found a Mr. Dalby (an English Gentleman) here—both of whom...
50[Diary entry: 14 January 1785] (Washington Papers)
Friday 14th. Mercury at 32 in the Morning 34 at Noon & 38 at Night. The Wind tho’ there was not much of it came from the So. West and continued at the same point the whole day. Appearances of Snow in the Forenoon but clear afterwards until Sunset—when it went down in a bank. Mr. Griffith & Mr. Dalby both went away after breakfast. Received an Invitation to the Funeral of Mr. Thos. Kirkpatrick...