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Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Richard Henry" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Project="Washington Papers"
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I make no doubt but that you have seen in the public papers that my ill state of health had compelled me to quit this City and Congress to seek relief from leisure and the Chalybiate springs near Philadelphia —It is that circumstance that has prevented me from the pleasure of replying sooner to your favor of August the 22d, which I now do with many thanks for its obliging contents. The...
I was unwilling to interrupt your attention to more important affairs at Phila. by sending there an acknowledgement of the letter that you were pleased to honor me with from that City; especially as this place afforded nothing worthy of your notice. We have the pleasure to see the first Act of Congress for selling federal lands N.W. of Ohio becoming productive very fast—A large sum of public...
In reply to your favor of december the 14th I had the honor to write to you from Trenton, and I mentioned an enclosed letter from you for the Marquis Fayette, which coming to hand after the Marquis had sailed, I wished to know your pleasure, whether I should forward it to France or return it to you—I have not been honored with your commands upon that point. Soon after my arrival in this city,...
This will be delivered to you by the honorable Mr Sitgreaves a very worthy delegate to Congress from N. Carolina; who has been long detained by his desire to see the Land Ordinance passed, but he is obliged at last to quit us before it is finally so—The reasons he can give you. I had some time ago written a letter for you in answer to your last faver & kept it to go by this Gentleman, whose...
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 29 May 1785. On 22 June GW wrote Lee : “I stand indebted to you for your favors of the . . . 29th of last month.”
I have the honor to enclose to you an Ordinance that we have just passed in Congress for establishing a temporary government beyond the Ohio, as a measure preparatory to the sale of the Lands. It seemed necessary, for the security of property among uninformed, and perhaps licentious people, as the greater part of those who go there are, that a strong toned government should exist, and the...
The letter that you did me the honor to write to me on the 12th of June last, I did not receive until two days ago. I impute this to my having been obliged to leave the Assembly, by the ill state of my health, a fortnight before it was adjourned. The very great respect that I shall ever pay to your recommendations, would have been very sufficient to have procured my exertions in favor of Mr...
Letter not found: Richard Henry Lee to GW, 15 Feb. 1787. GW wrote Lee on 20 Feb. : “Your favour of the 15th . . . came safe to hand.”
I had the honor of writing to you last by the post that left Trenton just before I quitted that place, and I should not so soon have troubled you again, if it were not to furnish you with the very excellent pamphlet that accompanies this letter—Doctor Price has lately sent over a few of those pamphlets to the President of Congress and left the disposal of them to him—I am very sure that I...
I should sooner have done myself the honor of writing to you, if it had been in my power to have communicated any thing agreeable—But I could only have informed you that we had not, have not, nor can we say when, Members enough will be assembled to make a Congress. As yet we have but four States convened. This lassitude in our public councils must afflict our friends, and encourage the hopes...
I have the honor to send you by this opportunity the Act of Assembly passed in 1772, by which yourself, with me and others, were appointed Trustees to manage the sale of the Land held in Tail by Mr Wm Booth and his Lady, and to purchase and settle other lands to descend as those in Tail would have done. Mr Booth did long since sell the Intailed Land to Squire Lee of Maryland, and purchased...
On the Sunday sennight after leaving Mount Vernon I arrived here, where to my surprise I found that a quorum of the Senate was not assembled, and but a small majority of Representatives. On this day we went to business, and to my very great satisfaction I heard an unanimous vote of the electing States in favor of calling you to the honorable office of President of the United States. Before...
I have the honor to enclose for your consideration and signature papers relative to our execution of the trust reposed on us for selling Mr Booths land and purchasing the lands in lieu. The partys are very desirous to have this business finished, and I have no doubt but that the saving clause, and the provision at the end of the deed, renders this conveyance perfectly safe for us. You will...
I should before this have thanked you for your favour of March 15th, if I had not been in daily expectation that the arrival of the packets would bring us some intelligence from Europe worth communicating to you; the February packet has but just come in after a passage of eight weeks, and neither she or other vessels in short passages, bring us any thing interesting. War or peace in Europe,...
I lately had the honor of forwarding a packet for you by Post that came enclosed to me from France, by the author of a Dramatic piece on the former situation of Capt. Asgil. The subject is not a bad one, but the Author of this work seems not to have made the most of it. On the 1st of May Mr Du Mas writes us, that the parties still continue to negotiate the peace in a very threatening manner...
I am now to thank you for the letter that you did me the honor to write to me on the 8th of this month, and which I received on the 17th with the enclosures. Sir James Jay had mentioned the plan of Lady Huntingdon to me, previous to the receipt of your letter, and at the same time that your packet reached me, there came one to Congress from Governor Henry with her Ladyships letter and plan...
I had the honor to receive your obliging letter, of the 14th instant, seven days after its date and I thank you Sir for its friendly contents and sensible communications. Your ideas concerning the western country are wise and just. They will certainly have great weight when that business shall be discussed in Congress: and that will probably be the case soon after we know the success of our...
I have long had a letter prepared for you in answer to your last favor which I have kept for the honorable Mr Sitgreaves to be the bearer of, as he proposed to visit you on his return to North Carolina; and the more especially as his stay has been occasioned by the necessity of seeing the very important ordinance passed for selling the western lands, which I wished you to have in its perfected...