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    • Pickering, Timothy
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Documents filtered by: Author="Pickering, Timothy" AND Period="Adams Presidency" AND Project="Washington Papers"
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Recollecting your anxiety that General Pinckney might [not] feel satisfied with the military arrangements of General officers proposed by you, I seize the first moment to relieve you from it. This morning Mr McHenry has received from Genl Hamilton a letter dated yesterday, in which is the following passage: After mentioning the arrival of General Pinckney, Genl Hamilton says— “You will learn...
The immediate publication of Govr Blount’s letter to Carey, after the receipt of the copy sent you by Colo. Henley seemed to render of little consequence this copy, which, however, I return, agreeably to your request on its transmission. To morrow I move my family and office to Trenton. Not that I think the danger of the contagious fever in any measure considerable: but persons are...
I have been honoured with your letter of the 21st covering several letters to be forwarded to Great Britain, which I shall do with great pleasure, and beg you to believe that I shall at all times cheerfully execute Similar commands. The plan for establishing the board of agriculture in England, I will lay before the Committee of Congress on that subject, as you request. Mr Monroe has made a...
After messages without number, Mr Anthony has brought me your copying press with the new brass rollers, for which he has charged ten dollars more than he at first mentioned as the probable price. The reason he assigns, is the greater weight of brass, increasing the founders bill to twenty one dollars. I have paid him, and inclose his receipt for $35, after endeavouring to reduce his demand....
Capt. OBrien arrived here last Saturday from Lisbon. The Dey of Algiers is entirely our friend. Tripoli has agreed to a perpetual peace, for 40,000 dollars & some peace presents, without an annual tribute. In January last Mr Barlow mentions his expectations that peace would soon be effected with Tunis. The Dey of Algiers is now so warmly attached & has such entire confidence in the Honesty of...
(confidential) Sir, Philadelphia August 2. 1799. A letter from Mr Murray of May 17 received this week, covers a letter from Talleyrand, dated May 12th, assuring him that the Executive Directory will receive the Envoys of the U. States in their official character; and that they shall enjoy all the prerogatives attached to it by the law of nations; and that one or more ministers shall be duly...
Not meeting myself with any private conveyance, I have committed to the Atty Genl the care of forwarding the packet with your buckles; and also mentioned it to Mr Harrison, whose wife will shortly go to her father’s, & who will carry it, if Mr Lee should not find a conveyance. Mr Barlow sent by Capt OBrien a parcel of Barbary mellon seeds, addressed to the Society of Agriculture of...
(private) Sir Trenton [N.J.] Sept. 13 1798. I have this moment received your favour of the 9th. Since mine of the 1st the Secretary of War has received from the President a letter deciding the ranks of the three first General Officers in question—that they shall stand, Knox—Pinckney—Hamilton. This decisive act is the more surprizing, seeing but a fortnight before the President had written to...
Last evening I received from Mr John Parish, our former Consul at Hamburg, a letter dated the 3d of August, from which I transcribe the last paragraph, as follows. “Permit me, before concluding, to request that you will do me the honor of representing to General Washington, that an old servant of the United States would be happy to send from hence any thing which he may think will in the...
I have been so much occupied since the receipt of your letter desiring a copy of one you wrote last year, that I have not had time to search for the original: as soon as I can I will do it, & if found, forward a copy. Your letter of the 15th covering one for Mr Murray & one for Lafayette I will take care of, and forward those two to their destination in a few days, when I shall write to Mr...
I duly received your letter of the 6th ulto and must beg your pardon for suffering it to lie so long unanswered. I have shown the letter to all my colleagues; and we are of opinion that it is neither necessary nor expedient for you publicly to contradict the false assertions of Fauchet. The villains who propagate slanders against you in this country do not believe in their own assertions: of...
On the 18th I was honoured with your letter of the 14th covering an instrument directing the transfer of the streets and public lots in the City of Washington from Messrs Beall & Gantt to the Commissioners for that city: The seal of the United States has been affixed to it; and by to-morrow’s mail I shall send it to the Commissioners, as you desire. Dr Edwards has handed me the inclosed...
This morning I saw a New-York paper announcing the arrival of General Pinckney, & that on account of the prevailing fever, he had landed at Paulus Hook: So I expect in two or three days to have the happiness to see him. The inclosed letter I received yesterday morning, with others by the mail from New-York. I have the honor to be with great respect sir your most obt servt ALS , DLC:GW . The...
I am just honoured with your letter of the 11th. The William Penn will, I am told, sail from this port directly for London, in two days, if the present soft weather continues. If I am disappointed in this conveyance, I will send the letters for Mr King & sir John Sinclair to New-York, to be forwarded by the first vessel for London. The letter for Mr Murray I shall forward in like manner by the...
(private) Sir, Philadelphia July 18, 1799. I am honoured with your letter of the 14th. La Fayette will not come to America as a minister : On the 13th instant I received a private letter from Mr Murray dated the 16th of April, inclosing one from Pichon, dated the 12th, written with Talleyrand’s privity, and indeed by his order. Pichon is eager to be the first to announce to Murray the message...
I have the honor to inclose another letter from Colo. Humphreys which came in some of his late letters from Lisbon, & which among a mass of dispatches was overlooked. I have yet met with no private conveyance for the case with the buckles mentioned in my last. A letter of January 12 th reed this day from Mr Adams at the Hague, contains his conjectures on the motives of the extraordinary...
I put one of your letters for Mr King and the four before received (for Sr John Sinclair & others) on board a vessel bound to London, & which was to have sailed last Sunday or monday; but the continued rainy weather has detained her. Mr Monroe has anticipated me in furnishg you, by his publication in the news-papers, the correspondence between us on the subject of his demanding the reasons of...
(Private) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Septr 1. 1798. On the 16th of July I was honoured with your answer of the 11th to my letter of the 6th respecting the appointment of General Officers for the New American Army; and was afterwards happy in seeing in the arrangement brought by the Secretary of War from Mount Vernon, that Colo. Hamilton’s name occupied the station in which the public voice,...
I was honoured with your letter of the 28th ult. by this days post. A copy of the laws neatly bound, and of my letter to General Pinckney with the documents to which it refers, have been some time packed up for you. The workman who undertook to make rollers for your copying press, has been called on many times; and he has often promised to complete them. At the last call, about two days since...
I do myself the honor to inclose copies of the instructions to and dispatches from the Envoys of the United States at Paris. No statement of the facts described in the latter can give them their proper force: but the facts as related by the envoys, with the manner and all their circumstances, carry irresistable evidence to every fair and unprejudiced mind, that this display of corruption and...
The inclosed has just come to hand with Mr King’s public letters. The publication of the instructions to our Envoys to the French Republic and their dispatches is operating admirably. The Democrats in neither House of Congress make much opposition: and out of doors, the French Devotees are rapidly quitting the worship of their idol. The long-enduring patience of the people of the U. States...
The inclosed pamphlet on Orcharding, addressed to you by the author, I received this evening under cover from Mr King. Another copy is also addressed to you, & has the following addition on the cover—“for the philosophical society of Philadelphia, with the author’s compts.” If you think proper to introduce it to the Society, & favour me with your letter for the purpose, I will put that under...
(private) Sir, Philadelphia Feby 21. 1799. I have been honoured with your letter of the 21st. My letter of the 8th contained nothing that need be concealed from your friends. except when I mark a letter confidential, you will be pleased to make such use of it as you think proper. The subject of the present one is not an exception, as to your discreet friends: for I am sure no officer about the...
The inclosed interesting pamphlet is a faithful translation from the original French, transmitted to me by Mr King. As it details facts which demonstrate the perfidy and violence of the French Government, I had it translated, and recommended it to the printer in this place; hoping the dissemination of it in America might do good. I think the Government could expend money in no way more...
Your last letters to be forwarded to Europe I expect will proceed next week. The three for England I shall put under cover to Mr King and send them by the British packet which is to sail next Wednesday or Thursday. I have the honor to inclose copies of the Presidents communications to Congress on the 18th & 21st of January, concerning French affairs. In my report, I had noticed (in as gentle...
I wrote you a hasty letter on the 13th—Upon further consideration, we have judged it most advisable that a letter should be written by Mr Wolcott alone; in order that the strong point of view in which the facts and arguments in the case may be placed, may be presented by Reason only, to which the mind yields more willingly than to formal advice, in the semblance of official authority. This is...
(Private) (& Confidential) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Oct. 24. 1799 I am this evening honoured with your letter of the 20th. When I last wrote you, I had grounds to expect, on the President’s arrival; that the mission to France would be suspended, until the fate of its government should be known. This great question I supposed (& my colleagues had formed the same expectation) would be a subject of...
It will give you additional pleasure to learn that such is the increased and increasing respectability of the U. States among the European powers—that from being viewed with indifference & even contempt, our friendship and commerce are courted. The Russian minister at London has suggested to Mr King that a Commercial treaty with the U. States would be agreeable to the Emperor Paul; and added,...
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 3 Dec. 1799. GW’s letter of 24 Nov. to Pickering is docketed by Pickering, “answd Decr 3d.”
This morning’s mail brought me your letter of the 25th. I will forward the two letters you inclosed for John Trumbull Esqr. & Mr Dandridge, to the care of Mr King, by the Grantham packet, which is to sail this week. Governor Davie of No. Carolina is appointed, and, should the mission proceed, will accept the place of Envoy to the French Republic, in the room of Patrick Henry Esqr. who...