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Documents filtered by: Author="Morris, Gouverneur" AND Project="Washington Papers"
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I take the Liberty of addressing your Excellency upon a Subject so much out of my own Line, that I must be entirely in your Equity, as to the Charge of Impertinence. I hope to be acquitted. The Committee of Safety have ordered, that the sick Soldiery should be transported to an Island called little Barn Island; which was, and perhaps still is, the Property of Captn John Montresor, an Engineer...
I expected before this to have written to you “Provision is made for the American Officers” but that Thief of Time Procrastination hath kept it off from Time to Time. The Question is now an Order of the Day and as such takes Place of every other Business When it will be determined I know not but this I know that it shall be finished one Way or the other before any Thing else Let what will...
Knox is to attend the Council. Conway hath resigned & his Resignation is accepted. The Affairs of the Army are necessarily delayed by the foreign Affairs which have broken in upon us. As to the Half Pay Matters stand thus the Questions have been carried but by an Entry on the Minutes there is an Agreemt that a final Question shall be put whether it be finally determined in Congress or sent to...
Permit me to congratulate you on the passing a Resolution for a Kind of Establishment at this late Hour It is not what you wished but it may do You must pardon a little to the Republicanism of our Ideas. What is a little extraordinary there was no Dissentient State and only two Individuals Yet no Measure hath ever been more severely contested. We shall now go thro the Regimental & other...
We are going on with the regimental Arrangements as fast as possible and I think the Day begins to appear with Respect to this Business. Had our Saviour addressed a Chapter to the Rulers of Mankind as he did many to the Subjects I am perswaded his Good Sense would have dictated this Text. Be not wise overmuch. Had the several Members who compose our multifarious Body been only wise enough Our...
I wrote you a few Days ago by Colo. Johnson; as he is not yet gone, I will now add two Things I forgot to mention then. The first is that if you send any General to Rhode Island you will probably find it most convenient to get rid of Varnom, Whose Temper and Manners are by no Means calculated to teach Patience Discipline & Subordination. Congress having determined on the Affair of the...
I have sent to your Addressé three Bundles containing the several Materials collected by the Committee for arrangg the army. This Business being now put under your Care I trust you will be enabled speedily to put your Army in the Situation you wish excepting always the Deficiency of Numbers which is upon the whole well enough since thereby it happens that less of the Resources of the Country...
I was in your Debt. It is my Fate always to be so with my Friends. But beleive me my Heart owes Nothing. Let me add that you can do me no Favor so great as to comply with your Wishes except an Opportunity to serve the Public which indeed is your highest Wish as you have evidenced fully to all the World & particularly to your Friends. I feel the full Force of your Reasoning. The Faith of...
I wrote you a Letter long since which went backwards & whether it hath ever Yet got so far forwards as to reach you I am utterly incapacitated even to guess trusting however that you have got or will get it I shall not from Memory repeat what if there at all is at best but faintly traced. At present I trouble you on the Subject of recruiting your Army which is at this Moment in Debate before...
I received your Favor and return you Thanks for it. The Conduct which the Enemy may pursue with Relation to us is not quite decided But I have not a Doubt but their Efforts during the next Campaign will be chiefly towards our Frontiers with a View to weary us into Submission. At the same Time they will perhaps endeavor to keep such Posts in our Country as to render the Communications tedious...
As Congress have delegated to a Committee, of which I have the Honor to be a Member, the Superintendance of the Commissary & Quarter Masters Departments; this, together with our Finances which we have long been cobling at, hath obliged me to consider in a more compleat View the State of our Affairs than my former detached Attention would permit, or indeed than my natural Indolence would have...
You will excuse in me the Liberty I have taken in requesting Colo. Morgan to call on you. That Gentleman can give you much and important Information relative to the State of our Western Frontiers. From the first View of the Commander in that Department at York Town he struck me as one of those who excel in the Regularity of Still Life from the Possession of an indolent Uniformity of Soul. The...
You must permit me most heartily to congratulate you upon the very important Intelligence which Monsr Gerard will confidentially communicate to you. It is and indeed ought to be a Secret even from Congress for which I need give you no Reasons as you are but too well acquainted with them. Measures have already been taken for obtaining the necessary Supplies which the Minister will detail to...
Two Days ago I was placed on a Committee to report the necessary Provision to be made for Officers not heretofore provided for. I recollect at present the general Officers & Erskine’s Corps (The Surgeons are already reported & the Report set down for this Day when as the Devil will have it I cannot attend) but as it would produce many Inconveniences to make this Provision which Congress intend...
I write this Letter as a Companion for some Shoes of Miss Bassett and if it is addressed to you rather than to her you must for that Trouble as well as many others accuse that Celebrity which you had no little Trouble in acquiring. But you must tell the Lady that I am far from thinking that she ought not be as much celebrated as any General among you. Indeed between ourselves I think she will...
Shortly after your Departure from this Place, I went to my Farm and returned hither last Sunday Evening. Living out of the busy World, I had Nothing to say worth your Attention, or I would earlier have given you the Trouble you now experience. Altho not very inquisitive about political opinions I have not been quite inattentive. The States Eastward of New York appear to be almost unanimous in...
Enclosed with this you will receive two Books which I recd some considerable Time since at Richmond; but being then about to depart for this Place, brought them hither in the Hope of an Opportunity to send them direct to Mount Vernon. Failing in that Expectation, I now put them in the Office; as I recollect you will not have to pay the Postage which otherwise would be worth at least as much as...
I cannot prevail on myself to omit the present Occasion of offering my Respects, altho I have Nothing to say which is worth your Perusal. It may not however be quite unsatisfactory to receive even Conjecture on a Subject whose Importance is great and whose Situation precludes Evidence. As far as one who avoids much Enquiry can judge I am led to decide that the Opposers to the new Constitution...
After many unforeseen Delays I am about shortly to take my Departure from Philadelphia for the Kingdom of France and expect to visit both Holland and England. When I desire to be favored with your Commands it is not the meer ceremonious Form of Words which you every Day meet from every Man you meet and which you know better than any Man to estimate at its true Value. Whether I can be useful to...
The Robbery lately committed on the Southern Mail obliges me to trouble you with a mighty insignificant Letter to tell you of that Accident that in Case you had sent Letters by that Post they might be renewed —You will oblige me by mentioning the Circumstance to Colo. Humphreys—In about ten Days hence I expect to sail for Havre and as I mentd in a former Letter shall hope to be favored with...
Your Letter of the twenty eighth of last Month came safe to Hand this Day. Accept my Thanks for the several Letters of Introduction you have taken the Trouble to write. I feel a proper Sense of your Kindness on this, as on many other Occasions, and I hope and beleive that I shall have Opportunities of evincing my Attachment. At the same Time I beleive, and hope, and most ardently desire that...
Upon my Arrival at this Place I spoke to Mr Jefferson on the Subject of your Watch. He told me that the Man who had made Maddison’s was a Rogue and recommended me to another—Romilly—But as it might happen that this also was a Rogue I enquired at a very honest Man’s Shop, not a Watch Maker, and he recommended Gregson. A Gentleman with me assured me that Gregson was a Rogue and both of them...
The above is Copy of what I had the Honor to write the twenty third of last Month. Since that Period there are Advices here which announce the ReEstablishment of the King of Great Britain’s health, but from a Letter I have just now received from the Marquis de la luzerne, I am disposed to Doubt of the fact. The other Day I saw the Duc de Castries who served in America under the Title of the...
I had the Pleasure to write to you a short Letter on the third of last Month. Monsieur de la fayette is since returned from his political Campaign in Auvergne, crowned with Success. He had to contend with the Prejudices and the Interests of his order, and with the Influence of the Queen and Princes (except the Duke of Orleans) but he was too able for his Opponents. He played the Orator with as...
I had the Honor to write to you on the twenty ninth of April last. I shall not trouble you with a Recital of Events which Mr Jefferson has I know very amply communicated to the Office of foreign Affairs. But being here on my Way to London, and finding a Vessel bound directly to New York, I take the Opportunity to send some Tables which contain the political military pecuniary and commercial...
Duplicate Sir Paris 22d January 1790 I received from Major Hasgill who arrived here on the twenty first Instant the two Letters which you did me the Honor to write upon the thirteenth of October. I shall in Consequence set off for London as soon as I possibly can. When last in that City I saw the Duke of Leeds twice at the french Embassadors, and from some slight Circumstances was induced to...
[Duplicate] Private Dear Sir Paris 22 January 1790 In another Letter of this Date I have mentioned a Part of Yesterday’s Conversation with the Count de Montmorin. That Part of it which I am now to communicate is for yourself alone. As Monsieur de la fayette had asked me some Days ago who should be sent to replace the Comte de Moustiers and (upon my answering with great Indifference it might be...
I have received your kind Letter of the thirteenth of October and immediately set about procuring the Articles you there mention. Such of them at least as are best to be procured in this Capital. They are already on their Way to Havre and you will find here enclosed the Account of the Cost (including the Packages) ⟨L⟩ 2384 . The Transportation to Havre will cost 46 The Charges there and the...
Accept I pray you the Seeds sent herewith. They are from the King’s Gardens and as you will observe by the within List the trees and Plants are from the Southern Provinces of this Kingdom—I think therefore they will flourish at Mount Vernon. I am always truly yours. AL , DLC:GW . The original of this undated note is filed at the end of January 1790 in the Washington Papers at the Library of...
Etat Des Graines des pais meridionaux De france Murier Blanc pour Les Elever de vers a Soye—white mulberry (for breeding Silk worms[)] Lentisque—Mastic-Tree. Therebinthe—Turpentine-Tree paliure—a species of the bramble or thorn. arbousier—the arbute or strawberry-Tree. micocoulier—an african tree, being a kind of lotos. mirthe—myrtle common Laurier frane. noble laurel. Erable de montpelier—The...