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Not having enjoyed one days health since I had the honor of seeing you at Shuters hill, and closely confined at home, I knew not until yesterday that Mr H: Muse the Collector of Rappahanock had put his place in jeopardy by a conduct certainly very full of danger to the public affairs. A young man of the same name and family has requested me to lay before you the reputation for fitness rightly...
Having been informed that you designed to go northward in a few days, and finding Mrs Lees recovery to be too slow for the purpose of seeing you at Mount Vernon as we travelled homewards; I had fixed on this day, with my Son Ludwell to pay our respects to you. But, to my very great mortification and disappointment, I was attacked with a fever last Night, the consequence of the influenza that...
A long and severe visitation of intermitting fever since I returned from Congress, has placed me in a very low and reduced situation. But unfit as I now am for writing, I cannot withhold my testimony when it is requested, in favor of a very deserving young Man who wishes an appointment to the command of one of the Cutters to be equipped under the late Act of Congress “providing more...
I intended this morning to have personally delivered you the letters that I now enclose and had hopes of being indulged with a private conversation on the contents of them; but I was hindered by the company then present. Your ill state of health as well as my own, and the business that surrounds us both, may perhaps under this mode of conveyance the most convenient—The letter that I have now...
On the Sunday sennight after leaving Mount Vernon I arrived here, where to my surprise I found that a quorum of the Senate was not assembled, and but a small majority of Representatives. On this day we went to business, and to my very great satisfaction I heard an unanimous vote of the electing States in favor of calling you to the honorable office of President of the United States. Before...
I have the honor to enclose for your consideration and signature papers relative to our execution of the trust reposed on us for selling Mr Booths land and purchasing the lands in lieu. The partys are very desirous to have this business finished, and I have no doubt but that the saving clause, and the provision at the end of the deed, renders this conveyance perfectly safe for us. You will...
I was unwilling to interrupt your attention to more important affairs at Phila. by sending there an acknowledgement of the letter that you were pleased to honor me with from that City; especially as this place afforded nothing worthy of your notice. We have the pleasure to see the first Act of Congress for selling federal lands N.W. of Ohio becoming productive very fast—A large sum of public...
I have the honor to enclose to you an Ordinance that we have just passed in Congress for establishing a temporary government beyond the Ohio, as a measure preparatory to the sale of the Lands. It seemed necessary, for the security of property among uninformed, and perhaps licentious people, as the greater part of those who go there are, that a strong toned government should exist, and the...
I have the honor to send you by this opportunity the Act of Assembly passed in 1772, by which yourself, with me and others, were appointed Trustees to manage the sale of the Land held in Tail by Mr Wm Booth and his Lady, and to purchase and settle other lands to descend as those in Tail would have done. Mr Booth did long since sell the Intailed Land to Squire Lee of Maryland, and purchased...
Letter not found: Richard Henry Lee to GW, 15 Feb. 1787. GW wrote Lee on 20 Feb. : “Your favour of the 15th . . . came safe to hand.”
I make no doubt but that you have seen in the public papers that my ill state of health had compelled me to quit this City and Congress to seek relief from leisure and the Chalybiate springs near Philadelphia —It is that circumstance that has prevented me from the pleasure of replying sooner to your favor of August the 22d, which I now do with many thanks for its obliging contents. The...
I lately had the honor of forwarding a packet for you by Post that came enclosed to me from France, by the author of a Dramatic piece on the former situation of Capt. Asgil. The subject is not a bad one, but the Author of this work seems not to have made the most of it. On the 1st of May Mr Du Mas writes us, that the parties still continue to negotiate the peace in a very threatening manner...
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 29 May 1785. On 22 June GW wrote Lee : “I stand indebted to you for your favors of the . . . 29th of last month.”
This will be delivered to you by the honorable Mr Sitgreaves a very worthy delegate to Congress from N. Carolina; who has been long detained by his desire to see the Land Ordinance passed, but he is obliged at last to quit us before it is finally so—The reasons he can give you. I had some time ago written a letter for you in answer to your last faver & kept it to go by this Gentleman, whose...
I have long had a letter prepared for you in answer to your last favor which I have kept for the honorable Mr Sitgreaves to be the bearer of, as he proposed to visit you on his return to North Carolina; and the more especially as his stay has been occasioned by the necessity of seeing the very important ordinance passed for selling the western lands, which I wished you to have in its perfected...
I should before this have thanked you for your favour of March 15th, if I had not been in daily expectation that the arrival of the packets would bring us some intelligence from Europe worth communicating to you; the February packet has but just come in after a passage of eight weeks, and neither she or other vessels in short passages, bring us any thing interesting. War or peace in Europe,...
I am now to thank you for the letter that you did me the honor to write to me on the 8th of this month, and which I received on the 17th with the enclosures. Sir James Jay had mentioned the plan of Lady Huntingdon to me, previous to the receipt of your letter, and at the same time that your packet reached me, there came one to Congress from Governor Henry with her Ladyships letter and plan...
In reply to your favor of december the 14th I had the honor to write to you from Trenton, and I mentioned an enclosed letter from you for the Marquis Fayette, which coming to hand after the Marquis had sailed, I wished to know your pleasure, whether I should forward it to France or return it to you—I have not been honored with your commands upon that point. Soon after my arrival in this city,...
I had the honor of writing to you last by the post that left Trenton just before I quitted that place, and I should not so soon have troubled you again, if it were not to furnish you with the very excellent pamphlet that accompanies this letter—Doctor Price has lately sent over a few of those pamphlets to the President of Congress and left the disposal of them to him—I am very sure that I...
I had the honor to receive your obliging letter, of the 14th instant, seven days after its date and I thank you Sir for its friendly contents and sensible communications. Your ideas concerning the western country are wise and just. They will certainly have great weight when that business shall be discussed in Congress: and that will probably be the case soon after we know the success of our...
I should sooner have done myself the honor of writing to you, if it had been in my power to have communicated any thing agreeable—But I could only have informed you that we had not, have not, nor can we say when, Members enough will be assembled to make a Congress. As yet we have but four States convened. This lassitude in our public councils must afflict our friends, and encourage the hopes...
The letter that you did me the honor to write to me on the 12th of June last, I did not receive until two days ago. I impute this to my having been obliged to leave the Assembly, by the ill state of my health, a fortnight before it was adjourned. The very great respect that I shall ever pay to your recommendations, would have been very sufficient to have procured my exertions in favor of Mr...
I had the honor of addressing you last by my eldest son who went to camp about four weeks ago. Since that we have had the pleasure of hearing that your advances against York go successfully on. by this time I hope his Lordship begins seriously to repent the Quixote part that he has been acting in America. Surely the rage of despotism must be cooled by the total defeat of those great hopes...
I had the honor of replying to your polite and agreeable letter of July the 15th by my son Ludwell who expected either to wait on you with it in Virginia or to get the letter forwarded by the Marquis de la Fayette. Altho I am at this time laboring under a severe fit of the gout, it is impossible to refrain from congratulating you, and rejoicing with our country, on the present happy and...
I have just been favored with your polite and friendly letter of July the 15th last, for which I beg leave to return you my thanks—You may be assured Sir, that as I do not take up friendships upon trivial grounds, so I never lay them down for slight causes. I have been happy to find that the principles which attached me to you have increased, not diminished. If I have been silent some time,...
Altho our correspondence has been long interrupted I hope that our friendship never will notwithstanding the arts of wicked men who have endeavored to create discord and dissention among the friends of America: For myself, having little but my good wishes to send you, it was not worth while to take up your attention a moment with them. The contents of this letter will I am sure require no...
The inclosed letter from the Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina, committed by Congress to the consideration of a committee of three, and which, in the name of the committee I have now the honor to inclose your Excellency, will shew you the extremity to which our affairs in that quarter are driving. The Committee find a choice of difficulties in this business, because the reliance on Militia...
I hope the measures you have taken will be effectual to the purpose of reenlisting the Army, because it is an object of great importance; and I readily admit the propriety of first trying those methods which promise fewest ill consequences. Danger will only arise from pressing such too far, and urging the experiment too long. I very much fear Sir, that the knowledge of depreciation has reached...
Letter not found : from Richard Henry Lee, 6 Sept. 1778. On 23 Sept., GW wrote Lee : “Your favor of the 6th Instt did not get to my hands till the 18th.”
Letter not found : from Richard Henry Lee, 26 July 1778. On 10 Aug., GW wrote Lee : “A few days ago I received your favor of the 26th Ulto.”
I should long since have answered your favor of the 25th of May had it been worth while for any thing I had to communicate, to interrupt your attention from the important affairs with which you are surrounded. It is indeed more from motives of complaisance than any thing else that I now write—But I cannot help congratulating you Sir on the enemies abandoning Philadelphia, because, let their...
The unfortunate cause which hath prevented me from attending to your last favor sooner, will, I hope, be my excuse. The long sickness and death of my much loved brother of Belleview, has for some time past confined me in Virginia, and removed every other consideration from my mind. I now embrace the first good opportunity of sending you the pamphlet of forgeries that I formerly mentioned. Tis...
The inclosed came to my hand only a few days past altho from its date it appears to have been written long since. There are some useful suggestions in it, and therefore I send it to you—I do not know the Writers reason for dating it in April 1776 when from some parts in the body of the writing, it must have been written in the cours of the year 1777. The arts of the enemies of America are...
I have no doubt of being excused by you for not sooner answering your favor of the 24th last, when you are informed that my ill state of health has prevented me from attending as I ought, to the important matter it contains. I gave Mr Jones the letter, that he might inform Congress of such parts as it imported the public they should be acquainted with. As it appeared by the letters of Gen....
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 7 Nov. 1777. On 18 Nov. GW wrote Lee : “Your favour of the 7th Instant should not have remained so long unanswered.”
Your favor of the 16th I received yesterday, and was a good deal surprised to find you had been told that Congress had appointed Gen. Conway a Major General. No such appointment has been made, nor do I believe it will, whilst it is likely to produce the evil consequences you suggest. It is very true, that both within and without doors, their have been Advocates for the measure, and it has been...
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 11 Oct. 1777. GW wrote Lee on 16 Oct. : “Your favour of the 5th Inst. as also that of the 11th by Baron Kalb, are both to hand.”
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 5 Oct. 1777. GW wrote Lee on 16 Oct. : “Your favour of the 5th Inst. as also that of the 11th by Baron Kalb, are both to hand.”
The Representation made to your Excellency by a Board of General officers, touching the Inconveniences arising from the Mode in which regimental officers have drawn their Rations, having been committed to Us by Congress, We propose to report the inclosed Resolve, upon which We previously wish to have your Sentiments. We are not to consider the proposal for drawing more provissions than are...
The subject of your letter of the 17th is a very important one, and whilst it deserves the greatest attention, is certainly involved in great difficulty. Of one truth however, I beg you Sir to be convinced—That no desire to get rid of importunity has occasioned these appointments, but motives military and political meerly. These Adventurers may be divided into three Classes, some who came...
Being often obliged to write in great haste, is the reason that I sometimes omit to date my letters. But I am now to acknowledge the favor of yours of the 24th, and I readily acquiesce with your reasons concerning the Iron works—I was indeed not apprized of so great a number of these being in Jersey. I shall certainly exert myself to have your views for Gen. Arnold and Colo. Huntington carried...
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 21 April 1777. GW wrote in his letter to Lee of 24–26 April : “your favour of the 21st is come to hand.”
Your letter to the Committee was immediately laid before Congress, and in consequence thereof, Gen. Schuyler was ordered to carry your ideas into execution with all possible dispatch. The Troops are therefore ordered to Bristol without delay, and thither will go all such as come from the Southward. You have only to order them from Bristol to Head Quarters at your pleasure. The inclosures now...
The resolves of Congress, that you will receive by this Messenger, you may be assured, are not intended, by any means, to obstruct your views a single moment. If your judgement should incline you to think that the Troops had better march on to Head Quarters quick as possible, you have only so to order it, and it will give pleasure to every good man here. The business of speedily reenforcing...
My brother Delegates are of opinion that the inclosed papers may avail you something in settling some disputes about rank that may come before you, and therefore it is sent. Congress never did any thing in this matter, as the business was put into other hands. I realy think that when the history of this winters Campaign comes to be understood, the world will wonder at its success on our part....
I congratulate you sincerely on the several advantages your Troops have lately gained over the enemy, for ’tho each has been but small, yet in the whole they are considerable, and will certainly have the effect of inspiriting our army, whilst it wastes and discourages the other. May the great Dispenser of justice to Mankind put it in your power, before this campaign ⟨e⟩nds, to give these foes...
I am informed that a certain Mr Eustace, now in New York, but some time ago with Lord Dunmore, is acquainted with a practise that prevailed of taking letters out of the Post Office in Virginia and carrying them to Dunmore for his perusal and than returning them to the Office again. As it is of the greatest consequence that this nefarious practise be stopt immediately, I shall be exceedingly...
Letter not found: from Richard Henry Lee, 26 Mar. 1776. On 4 April GW wrote to Richard Henry Lee : “Your favour of the 26th Ulto came to my hands last Night.”
I was in Virga (from whence I am but just returned) when your favor of the 26th Decr came here, and now I have but a moment before this Gentleman goes off to thank you for it, and to cover a letter from your brother, with the proceedings and ordinances of our last Convention —Gen. Clinton had left Virginia before I did, and was gone to one, but which we do not know, of the Carolinas —Gen. Lee...
The inclosed letter from Colo. Pendleton came to hand two days ago, and as it will save a good deal of unnecessary writing, I send it to you. The proclamation there alluded to, we have seen. It proclaims martial law thro Virginia and offers freedom to all the Slaves, calling their Masters rebels &c.—It seems this unlucky triumph over Hutchings with his less than half armed Militia, so...