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I have the pleasure to enclose you the particulars of Colo. Clarkes success against St Vincenne as stated in his letter but lately received the messenger with his first letter having been killed. I fear it will be impossible for Colo. Clarke to be so strengthened as to enable him to do what he desires indeed the express who brought this letter gives us reason to fear St Vincenne is in danger...
I some time ago inclosed to you a printed Copy of an Order of Council, by which Governor Hamilton was to be confined in Irons and in close Jail. This has occasioned a letter from General Philips of which the inclosed is a Copy. The General seems to suppose that a prisoner on capitulation cannot be put into close confinement tho his Capitulation shall not have provided against it. My idea was...
I take the liberty of begging leave of your Excellency to forward the enclosed by the first flag which may happen to be going into New york. They are addressed to [a] good man in distress which I am sure will apologize with you for my asking your intervention. I am with the greatest respect your Excellencys mos. obdt & most hbl. servt Copy, DLC : Jefferson Papers. GW replied to Jefferson from...
On receipt of your letter of August 6th during my absence the Council had the irons taken off the prisoners of war. When your advice was asked we meant it should decide with us: and upon my return to Williamsburg the matter was taken up and the enclosed advice given. A parole was formed of which the enclosed is a copy and tendered to the prisoners. They objected to that part of it which...
Just as the letter accompanying this was going off Colo. Mathews arrived on parole from New York by the way of head quarters bringing your Excellencys letter on [t]his subject with that of the British Commissary of prisoners. The subject is of great importance & I must therefore reserve myself to answer after further consideration. Were I to speak from present impressions I should say it was...
In mine of the second of the present month written in the instant of Colo. Mathews delivery of your letter I informed you what had been done on the subject of Governor Hamilton & his companions previous to that moment. I now enclose you an advice of council in consequence of the letter you were pleased to enclose me from the British commissary of prisoners with one from Lord Rowdon. also a...
Your Excellency’s letter on the discriminations which have been heretofore made between the troops raised within this state and considered as part of our quota, & those not so considered, was delivered me four days ago. I immediately laid it before the Assembly, who thereupon came to the resolution I now do myself the honor of inclosing you. the resolution of Congress of Mar. 15. 1779 which...
I take the liberty of putting under cover to your Excellency, some Letters to Generals Philips & Reidesel, uninformed whether they are gone into New York or not, and knowing that you can best forward them in either Case. I also trouble you with a Letter from the Master of the Flag in this State to the British Commissary of Prisoners in New York, trusting it will thus be more certainly conveyed...
It is possible you may have heard that in the course of the last summer an expedition was mediated by our Colonel Clarke against Detroit; that he had proceeded so far as to rendezvous a very large body of Indians (I beleive four or five thousand) at Saint-Vincennes; but being disappointed in the number of whites he expected, and not chusing to rely principally on the Indians, was obliged to...
Since writing to your Excellency on the subject of the expedition against Detroit, the want of men, want of money & difficulty of procuring provisions, with some other reasons more cogent if possible & which cannot be confided to a letter, have obliged us to decline that object. I thought it therefore necessary to notify this to your Excellency that no expectations of our undertaking it may...
Since writing to your Excellency on the subject of the expedition against Detroit, the want of men, want of money & difficulty of procuring provisions, with some other reasons more cogent if possible & which cannot be confided to a letter, have obliged us to decline that object. I thought it therefore necessary to notify this to your Excellency that no expectations of our undertaking it may...
Majr Galvan as recommended by your Excellency was dispatched to his station without delay, and has been furnished with every thing he desired as far as we were able. the line of expresses formed between us is such as will communicate intelligence from the one to the other in twenty three hours. I have forwarded to him information of our disasters in the South, as they have come to me. Our...
Since sealing the within to your Excellency I received a letter from Govr Rutledge of which the inclosed is an extract. as it will correct & supply some parts of my letter I do myself the honor of transmitting it, and of again subscribing myself Your Excellency’s most obedt servt DLC : Papers of George Washington. I think it proper to acquaint you that, intelligence being received last...
I have received from the Committee of Congress at Headquarters three letters calling for aids of men & provisions. I beg leave to refer you to my letter to them of this date on those subjects. I thought it necessary however to suggest to you the preparing an arrangement of officers for the men: for tho’ they are to supply our battalions, yet as our whole line of officers almost are in...
In obedience to the act of our assembly, a copy of which I now do myself the honor of inclosing you, I am, in the name of the General assembly, "to request you to proclaim pardon to all deserters from the Virginia line of the continental army, who shall within two months after the publication of the act” (which took place about a week ago) “return to their several companies, if on land, & if...
Agreeable to the resolutions of Congress of January 13. 1780, we have turned over to the Continental Commissary of Prisoners at Winchester forty prisoners of war, a roll of whom I now take the liberty of inclosing to your Excellency. I have the Honor to be with all possible respect & esteem Your Excellency’s most obedient and most humble servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
As I know the anxieties you must have felt since the late misfortune to the South, and our latter accounts have not been quite so unfavorable as the first, I take the liberty of inclosing you a state of this unlucky affair extracted from letters from General Gates, Genl Stevens, & Govr Nash, and taken as to some circumstances from an officer who was in the action. another army is collecting....
I yesterday forwarded to you a letter from Colo. Wood informing you of his situation. That Post has been for some time past pretty regularly supplyed, and I hope will continue so to be for some time to come. A Person whose punctuality can be relied on offers to contract for victualling it. If We can agree on terms, and the Assembly will strengthen our Hands sufficiently. We think to adopt that...
The inclosed Copy of a letter from Ld Cornwallis to Colo. Balfour was sent me by Govr Rutledge: lest you should not have seen it I do myself the pleasure of transmitting it, with a letter of Genl Harrington to Genl Gates giving information of some late movements of the Enemy. I was honored yesterday with your favor of the 5th inst. on the subject of Prisoners and particularly of Lt. Govr...
I have this morning received certain information of the Arrival of a hostile fleet of about Sixty Sail in our bay. the debarkation of some light Horse in the Neighbourhood of Portsmouth, seems to indicate that, as the first scene of their action. we are endeavouring to collect as large a body to oppose them as we can arm: this will be lamentably inadequate if the Enemy be in any force; it is...
I take the liberty of inclosing to you Letters from Genl Hamilton for New York. On some representations received by Colo. Towles that an indudgence to Governor Hamilton and his companions to go to New York on parole would produce the happiest effect on the situation of our Officers in Long Island we have given him, Majr Hay & some of the same Party at Winchester leave to go there on Parole:...
The Executive of this State think it expedient and necessary that under our present circumstances the prisoners of war under the Convention of Saratoga be removed from their present situation. Many circumstances have led to this necessity. It will be utterly impracticable as long as they remain with us to prevent the hostile army now in this State from being reinforced by numerous desertions...
Since I had the honor of writing to your Excellency on the 25th ult. the enemy have withdrawn their force from the north side of James river, and have taken post at Portsmouth, which we learn they are fortifying, their highest post is Suffolk where there is a very narrow and defensible pass between Nansemond river and the dismal swamp, which covers the country below from being entered by us....
I inclose your Excellency a copy of an intercepted Letter from major General Leslie to Lord Cornwallis. it was taken on a person endeavouring to pass thro the country from Portsmourth towards Carolina. when he was apprehended and a proposal made to search him he readily consented to be searched but at the same time was observed to put his hand into his pocket and carry something towards his...
I have been honoured with your Excellency’s Letter of the 8th instant having found it impracticable to move suddenly the whole Convention troops, british and germans, and it being represented that there coud not immediately be covering provided for them all at fort Frederic k we concluded to march of the British first from whom was the principal danger of desertion and to permit the germans...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency on the subject of an expedition contemplated by this State against the british post at Detroit, and of receiving your answer of october 10th. since the date of my Letter the face of things has so far changed as to leave it no longer optional in us to attempt or to decline the expedition, but compels us to decide in the affirmative and to begin our...
It may seem odd considering the important events which have taken place in this State within the course of ten days past, that I should not have transmitted an account of them to your Excellency. but such has been their extraordinary rapidity & such the unremitted exertions they have required from all concerned in Government that I do not recollect the portion of time which I could have taken...
The inclosed extract of a Letter from Governor Nash which I received this Day being a confirmation of the intelligence I transmitted in a former Letter I take the liberty of handing it forward to your Excellency. I am informed through a private channel on which I have considerable reliance that the enemy had landed 500 troops under the command of a Major Craig who were joined by a number of...
By a Letter from General Greene dated Guilford C. house Feby 10. we are informed that Lord Cornwallis had burnt his own waggons in order to enable himself to move with greater facility & had pressed immediately on. the prisoners taken at the Cowpens were happily saved by the accidental rise of a watercourse which gave so much time as to withdraw them from the reach of the enemy. Lord...
I gave you information in my last letter that Genl Greene had cross’d the Dan, at Boid’s ferry, and that Ld Cornwallis had arrived at the opposite shore. large reinforcements of militia having embodied both in the front & the rear of the enemy, he is retreating with as much rapidity as he advanced. his route is towards Hilsborough. Genl Greene cross’d the Dan the 21st in pursuit of him. I have...
I had the pleasure of receiving a Letter from General Greene dated High Rockford february 29 (probably march 1) who informs me that on the night of the 24th Colo. McCall surprized a subaltern’s guard at Hart’s mill, killed 8 and wounded and took 9 prisoners, and that on the 25th Genl Pickens and Lieutenant Colo. Lee routed a body of near 300 Tories on the Haw river, who were in arms to join...
I have the honor of enclosing your Excellency a copy of a letter from Genl Greene with some other intelligence received, not doubting your anxiety to know the movements in the South. I find we have deceived ourselves not a little by counting on the whole numbers of militia which have been in motion as if they had all remained with Genl Greene, when in fact they seem only to have visited &...
The inclosed Letter will inform you of the arrival of a British Fleet in Chesapeake Bay. The extreme negligence of our stationed expresses is no doubt the cause why as Yet no authentic account has reached us of a general action which happened on the 15. instant about a mile and a half from Guilford Court House, between General Green and Lord Cornwallis. Captain Singleton an intelligent Officer...
I forward to your Excellency, under cover with this, copies of letters received from Major General Greene and Baron Steuben which will give you the latest state of the situation of things with us and in North Carolina. We had hoped to have received by the French Squadron under Mons: Tilly eleven hundred stand of arms which we had at Rhode-Island, but were disappointed. the necessity of...
On the 18th instant the enemy came from Portsmouth up James river in considerable force, tho’ their numbers precisely are not yet known to us. they landed at Burwells ferry below Williamsburg & near the mouth of Chickahominy above it. this latter circumstance obliged Colo. Innes who commanded a body of Militia stationed on that side the river to cover the country from depredation, to retire...
Since the Letter which I had the Honor of last addressing to your Excellency, the military movements in this state have scarcely merited Communication except a very late one. The Enemy after leaving Williams burg came directly up James River & landed at City point being the point of Land on the Southern Side of the Confluence of Appamattox & James Rivers; they marched up to Petersburg where...
I make no doubt you will have heard before this shall have the honour of being presented to Your Excellency of the junction of Lord Cornwallis with the force at Petersburg under Arnold who had succeeded to the command on the death of Major General Philips. I am now advised that they have evacuated Petersburg, joined at Westover a Reinforcement of 2000 Men just arrived from New York, crossed...
I hope it will not be unacceptable to your Excellency to receive the congratulations of a private individual on your return to your native country, & above all things on the important success which as attended it. great as this has been however, it can scarcely add to the affection with which we had looked up to you, and if in the minds of any the motives of gratitude to our good allies were...
Having lately received a call from Congress to pass the Atlantic in the character of one of their ministers for negotiating peace, I cannot leave the Continent without separating myself for a moment from the general gratitude of my country to offer my individual tribute to your Excellency for all you have suffered & all you have effected for us. were I to indulge myself in those warm effusions...
Your favor of the 3d is this moment put into my hands, and as the post does not usually stay here above an hour, it leaves me time to scribble a few lines only, scarcely admitting them to be prefaced with an acknowlegement of the pleasure it will give me to be permitted to communicate with you occasionnally. we received dispatches from Europe yesterday, by Capt. Barney. there is no news but in...
Since my last nothing new has occurred. I suppose the crippled state of Congress is not new to you. we have only 9 states present, 8 of whom are represented by two members each, and of course, on all great questions not only an unanimity of states but of members is necessary, an unanimity which never can be obtained on a matter of any importance, the consequence is that we are wasting our time...
Your servant delivered me your favor this morning; Capt. Barney is gone to Philadelphia and his vessel to Baltimore, having left with me one of your packages only. the persons who brought this could give me no certain account of the other package which you suppose to have been brought. this your servant now receives. Being obliged to seize a moment in Congress of writing you these few lines, I...
I am obliged to you for your query as to the distance from New York to Cayahoga, as it has occasioned my reexamination of that matter & detection of an error of 150 miles. the distances from New York to Niagara I collect from information as follows. from N. York to Albany  164 miles Oneida  165 Oswego  171 Niagara  180 680 from Niagara to Cayahoga 140 820 This last distance [from Niagara to...
I received your favor of the 8th inst. by Colo. Harrison. the subject of it is interesting, and, so far as you have stood connected with it, has been matter of anxiety to me: because whatever may be the ultimate fate of the institution of the Cincinnati, as in it’s course it draws to it some degree of disapprobation I have wished to see you stand on ground separated from it; & that the...
Every thing on this side the water seems to indicate a certainty of war. the Emperor seems decided in not receding from the right to navigate the Scheld; & the Dutch as determined not to yeild it. I suppose that this court & that of Berlin will take part with the Dutch, the Turks of course become parties in a war against the Emperor: & it seems as probable that the Empress of Russia will join...
Mr Houdon would much sooner have had the honour of attending you but for a spell of sickness which long gave us to despair of his recovery & from which he is but recently recovered. he comes now for the purpose of lending the aid of his art to transmit you to posterity. he is without rivalship in it, being employed from all parts of Europe in whatever is capital. he has had a difficulty to...
Permit me to add, what I forgot in my former letter, a request to you to be so kind as to communicate to me what you can recollect of Bushnel’s experiments in submarine navigation during the late war, and whether you think his method capable of being used successfully for the destruction of vessels of war. It’s not having been actually used for this purpose by us, who were so peculiarly in...
I have been honoured with your letter of Sep. 26 which was delivered me by Mr Houdon, who is safely returned. he has brought with him the mould of the face only, having left the other parts of his work, with his workmen to come by some other conveiance. Doctor Franklin, who was joined with me in the superintendance of this just monument, having left us before what is called the costume of the...
A conversation with the Count de Rochambeau yesterday obliges me to write a supplementary letter to that of the 4th instant. he informs me that he has had applications for paiment from the person who furnished the badges for the Cincinnati, as well the Americans as French. that this person informed him they were not paid for, that he had furnished them indeed on the application of major...
The house of Le Coulteux, which for centuries has been the wealthiest of this place, has it in contemplation to establish a great company for the fur trade. they propose that partners interested one half in the establishment should be American citizens, born & residing in the U.S. yet if I understood them rightly they expect that that half of the company which resides here should make the...