Thomas Jefferson Papers
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Memorandum Books, 1767

17671

Aug. [25.] 2 [. . . .]3 survey [. . . .]4 forfeited sold it to Edward [Pharr for 37] lib. 10/ cash and gave him a deed &c. Payne after this expr[essed sad?]ness at losing his mill but said [he?] had rather it should be in his h[ands? than?] any other’s. On which Pharr told [him? if?] he would make up his money in a [twelve]month he would return the land. He [agreed?] with Payne to keep the mill: Payne left [the mill?] as there was no house over it. The hogs d[evour?]ed a bag and corn. Pharr told him if he l[eft?] it again he should never have it. He [left?] it again within [a] month, and his custom[. . .]5 for them. Upon w[hich?] he sold her to [ ]n Dixon for 50 lib. [. . .] credit, and [. . .] pay. On this Josias P[ayne] brings an action on the case for damages for not complying with his agreement. (No[te] Payne within the twelvemonth had tende[red] him 38 lib., but that was not Pharr’s mo[ ] because besides the 37 lib. 10/ there were 2/6 for writing the deed, 8/9 for recording [it?] and 39/6 due on an another account which they had settled.) Payne recovers 40 lib. damages agt. which Pharr desires to be relieved. (Note before Dixon purchased Payne desired him to purchase it and th[at?] he would go halves with him.) Recd. 20/. I am to employ auxiliary. Inter[ ] [if?] not the money tendered by Payne borrowed mere[ly?] [. . .] and ground his action, and if Pharr had offered [. . . .]6
[. . . .]7
[The King]8 v. Tharpe and Calloway. An indictment for assaulting [. . .] Susanna Williams. To assist Pendleton.9 Depend principally on her character. She has declared she would not take 200 lib. for her chance. If we fail, we are to apply to Gov. for a remission. Endeavor to sever Calloway who has been joined merely to deprive pl. of his evidence, and he will prove provocation.
27. Rees v. Talford et al. and Rees v. Hayes et al. The Augusta men alledge that the Three ridge mountain, the Pr[iest] mountain, the Bald friar Mountain [. . .]10 [Pea]ks of Otter form that ridge which divides the counties11 (perhaps it may part thus ) but others say these are only spurs making from the blue ridge and adjoining thereto, and that the waters of James river issuing from the E. side of the blue ridge run between these mountains.
27. Taliaferro v.   Coffee. William Pannel possessed of an entry12 of 200 acres on N. branch of Tye river, Amherst, transferred it by a note in writing for 30/ to James Glenn. Glenn afterwards sold it back to Pannel for the same which Pannel paid in presence of Thomas Pannel, but there was never any direction to the <sheriff to> surveior about it. Pannel having removed to Carolina, instructed Benjamin Dove who was coming into [. . .] to sell this entry for him, which he according[ly] does to George Campbell, in 1765, who sells to Zachariah Taliaferro for  . Coffee, looking into the surveior’s books found that in the repurchase of Pannel from Glenn there had been no transfer in writing, and purchased in 1766 of Glenn, tho’ he had known of Taliaferro’s title above a year before. Note Taliaferro will get a transfer from Pannel in writing.
28. Fry, John ads.13 Hanbury mercht.
Sep. 12. Hickman v. Harper & Lewis. Issue sci. fa. agt. both defs. immediately.
13. Bring an action for Micajah Chiles agt. Matthew Jordan high sher. of Albemarle for taking his horse for his Tobacco dues.14 Dam. 100 lib. (John Fry (Coron[er).]
20. Received of Abner Witt 8/6 the caveat fee in Witt v. Barnet. Memdm. enter the Caveat Octob. 18.
26. Recd. of John Ford 6/3 in Ford v. Millar.15 Caveat.
 
Octob. 10. Price (Leonard) ads. Nicholson. Recd. special bail peice16 and orders to defend. Use all delay.
17. Robert Aldridge et ux. ads. Nicholas Grubb, infant by Bruin his next friend. Slander and    .
The same ads. Benjamin Grubb infant by Bruin his next friend. Slander. Recd. a letter from James Wood with directions to appear for defs.
19. Tharpe & Calloway ads. The King. The defs. fined 10/ each. To pay costs. Hairstone an evid[ence] allowed only two days attendance.
[Octo]b. 19. Jefferson (George) v. Witten and [John] Jefferson17 v. [ ]. Suits to be removed from Lunenburgh to Gen. court.18 G. Jefferson was undersheriff to M. Marrable and did not make up his collection of dues, and also served an exn. on Mumford but let him go without the money. Witten the succeeding sheriff (by an order of court made at the instion. of M. Marrable) distrained between 20 and 30 negroes, 10 or 12 horses and other things in Sep. in midst of pulling hemp and housing tobo. Jefferson offered him Henry Delony security, but he refused to take (qu. whether he object to the sufficiency of security, or that <security is not> the goods of an undersheriff are not repleviable.) John Jefferson was security for George, and is def. to one action. There are two other actions, but I am not to suffer them to be removed because the subject is under 10£. Advised the parties, one of them to suffer judgmt. below; to appeal from that judgment; the appellee to confess error in G. C. and then consent that the cause may be retained in it’s place and proceed to trial de novo by witnesses.
20. Dinwiddie (the Honble. Robert) agt. Lee (Richd.). To appear with the Atty. Gen. for pl.19
Octob. 20. Entered in the council office Caveats [in?] Ford v. Millar, Frame v. Warwick, Witt [v.] Barnett, Taliaferro v. Coffee. Also a Caveat in the name of Nichs. Meriwether v. myself for my three tracts of land in Bedford.20 Took out summonses in the above Caveats.
21. Pd. Walthoe21 28/9 for the above five Caveats.
23. Thompson v. Robertson. Petn. for 957 acres in Albemarle.
Nov. 4. Benjamin Harrison v. Edwd. Pye Chamberlayne. To appear for pl. at Mr. McCaul’s22 request. He took out writ and pd. tax. See acct. Dam. 150£ in Case.
Nov. 5. Thomas Lilly v. John Riddle. Capt. Lilly was purchasing wheat at 4/ per bushel, up James river. Riddle was on same business, and in order to prevent Lilly’s purchase (and to get wheat himself at 3/6) sd. to several (Colo. Carter Braxton, Phill Johnson and Ryland Randolph) ‘that it was no matter what Lilly gave for that all his bills would come back protested, but that his Riddle[’s] money was certain.’ The consequence [of] this was that after Lilly had purchased and came to draw bills he could not dispose of them without an endorsemt. Lilly issued the writ. Issue a writ. Damage 2000 lib.
Nov. 14. Inclosed the papers in Kypen & Co. v. Smith to Mr. Wallace.
17. David Frame (Augusta) directs me to issue writ in Scandal agt. James Burnside (Augusta). Burnside said ‘he <caught Frame (who is a married man) in bed with Elizabeth Burkin> put his on23 Frame’s ——— as he lay in bed with the girl and felt it wet and then put his hand on her ——— and felt it wet also.’
Stockdon v. Brackenridge. Recd. 5/.
18. Matthew Read (Augusta) emplois me to defend him at the suit of Abraham Feilder (Albemarle). Feilder the father of the pl. owed Read 3£ and the pl. to Dick Woods 10£. Read goes to Feilder the father for the money, he sais he has none but his son has a hhd. of tobo. which he may have. Read sais no, but he will send it to Augusta. He will assist him to sell it. The son carries it. Dick Woods takes out a writ at the court against the son, who delvd. the tobo. his horse and saddle. Woods sets it up to publick sale. Read tells the crier to bid for him. The crier accordingly buys it for £6–11. The son brings suit for them agt. Read.
18. Madison v. Johnson. Recd. 52/6.
John Archer (Augusta) directs me to defend him if an action of Slander should be brought agt. him by Elizabeth Crawford, an infant daur. of Patrick Crawford (Augusta). Archer was at Colo. Dandridge’s where the girl lived, and in presence of the company asked Mrs. Dandridge whether she was child.24 Mrs. D. ‘no, why do you ask?’ J. A. because it is so reported in Augusta. He declares he expressed himself in such a manner as to shew the company he did not believe it, and never has mentioned it at any other time before or since. He can prove that Ralph Loftus did report this at several times in Augusta. I am to employ an auxiliary a little before the suit comes to trial.
Clarke v. Coffee. Pl. lives Culpepper.
Andrew Johnston, and Thom. Bowyer direct me on behalf of themselves and John Madison junr. to enquire if a patent has issued to Robert Patterson (  ) for <500 acres on Linwell’s creek called the [. . .] tract (  ). If no patent has issued [. . .] a caveat in the name of Andrew Johnston but if patented, enter a petn. for nonpaiment of quitrents25 and want of cultivation and improvements. Also do the same with another> a tract of 300 acres on the same creek. Mem. they are not certain of having exactly mentioned the number of acres. They have been surveied above 10 years.
Rutherford ads. Buchanan. Wrote to def. to know his defence and inclosed a blank spa.
Devire and Daniel. Wrote to pl. to come to [. . . .]
Nov. 19. Bowan ads. Buchanan. Wrote to Bowan to get his witnesses to attend in June with a spa. to save expence. If they will not to let me know before Feb. 1. and I will get spa.
Harrison v. Chamberlayne. Wrote to Wm. Smith sheriff of N. Kent, to suppress 2d. writ, and discharge def. from appearance.
Daniel Gwinn ads. Johns Stuart. Slander. Same as other suits. Mr. Madison directs to appear for def.
Jno. Mills (Augusta) v.  See case. Recd. 10/.
James McKain (Augusta) v. Charles Patteson, Thomas Patteson, Wm. Bumpas, William Farguson and <John Jackson> a servt. of Bumpas whose name is forgot (but must be a def. to take off his evidence). It is John Jackson. (All in Buckingham except Farguson who [. . .] Prince Edward.) These people except Charles Patteson, being sheriffs and their assistants came to serve an exn. on a waggoner of Mills’s (exn. came from Bedford). The negro was touched by the sheriff as he says, but as they say he was not but McKain and Samuel Crawford stept in between the sheriff and negro, and the negro made his escape. Upon this the sheriff (who as the pl. says had not told he was sheriff, but Patteson sais he did) tied McKain, and Crawford, carried them to Charles Patteson his brother who was a justice, and who committed them immediately to close goal, where they remained in the criminal’s room 8 days. Notwithstanding Israel Christian offered himself as bail, or if they would allow him a few hours, to produce 3 or 4 others sufficient, or to deliver to the justice a waggon load of goods which he had there as a security; but he refused. To bring suit for McKain.
 
Samuel Crawford (Augusta) brings suit also. Mills answers for fees.
Israel Christian (Augusta) v. Bumpas and the two Pattesons. The three waggoners we[re] emploied in carrying goods for Christian [. . .] by the waggons being deserted above 50£ [. . .] were stolen, and forced to hire other wagg[oners?].
James Mccartey (Wmsburgh.) v. Wm. Waterson (Augusta). Debt on bond. To appear for pl. Recd. the bond.
Clark v. Coffee. Coffee has sold the land to John Ramsey (Augusta). Clarke thinks he can prove Ramsey knew of the petn. Coffee is gone to Carolin[e].
Jeremiah Ragan (Augusta) directs to petn. agt. Patrick Cane (Caroline) for 300 acres patented by Cane above 12 years ago, on the waters of Cook creek Augusta.
Nov. 20. John Syme (Hanover) v. John Shelton (Augusta) and Patrick Henry (<Hanover> Louisa. Friendly petn. See paper.
Waterson v. Waterson & Smith. The pl. dismisses <as to Smith>.
Capt. Hog’s case. He was sp. bail for a man who run away before the trial. A depon. taken de bene esse26 was read at the trial tho’ the deponent might have been present. This error was objected but overruled and an appeal thereon, but no bond was given by the appellant. A first and second sci. fa. is come out. Oyer of the recognisance will be demanded on the second, and the question is whether it will be too late then to give bond on the appeal?
Nov. 22. Wrote to John May27 to enter Caveats at the S. O.28 viz. Ford v. Millar, Frame v. Warwick & Taliaferro v. Coffee. Also to issue writs in Frame v. Burnside, Christian v. Patteson et al. and petns. in Johnston v. Patterson, Ragan v. Cane and Syme v. Shelton and Henry. Also to dismiss Waterson v. Waterson & Smith. To plead by guardian for Jer. & Andr. Talford in Rees v. Talford et al. To plead G. I. in Feilder v. Read, to let me know the sp. bail in Archer v. Dandridge, to search for and correct the summs. in Clarke v. Coffee, to send sci. fa. in Hickman v. Harper, and to suppress 2d. writ in Harrison v. Chamberlayne.
Nov. 21. Wm. Robertson’s case. ‘I bequeath unto my son William Robertson 160 acres of land, but I do hereby order and allow that if my son Wm. die without male issue coming to the years of maturity that then the above sd. land shall relapse to my son Thomas Robertson and his heirs, allways provided his wife Eliz. shall enjoy the benefit of the sd. land and plantation while she remains a widow.’
Dec. 8. Inclosed to Taliaferro his spa. agt. Coffee with directions to fill up the blank christian name.
Inclosed to Fr. Thorpe, Williams’s release to him. By Colo. Calloway.
10. Recd. of W. Allegre29 20/.
<Pd. W. Lewis for Davies for a book of arithmetic 5/.>30
<Pd. do. for venison 2/6.>
15. Recd. from S. O. writs in Frame v. Burnside, Christian v. Patteson, the summs. in Ragan v. Cane, and Sci. fa. in Hickman v. Harper. Also 6. petns. friendly are entered in Syme v. Shelton & Henry.
25. James McKain informs be31 by letter that Wm. Farguson and John Jackson are to be made defs. in his suit.
27. Inclosed writ of A. Q. Damnum to Wm. Robertson for which I pd. in S. O. 5/.

[1768]

July 14. 1768.32 x Robert Anderson and x Samuel Woods Amherst subscribe for Rind’s paper33 and x Chas. Lambe[rt] for the Gentleman’s Magazine34 x also have error in spelling his name rectified.
Aug. 11. Also x Thos. Ballard and x Thomas Stockdon x David Allen x Rachael Morison Amherst.
A. McCaul subscribes 3£ to the bridge.35
15. x Recd. of James McAlister Augusta 3/ and an advertisement to put into paper.
x Bring up patent for Richard Stockdon for 400 acres on the Mechum’s river Albemarle. Applied Sep. 29 but it is caveated by David Kinkead.
x Deliver Wm. Ellet’s transfer at S. O.
x Get stays for N. Jef.36
x Grattan v. Waterson. What is attad.?37
x Ask speaker38 for his opinion in a case in which C. H. Harrison39 consulted [him?].
[Sep. 26]40 Get some books of Fables for Polly Randolph.
 
Recd. of Webster bill 20/ No. 2532 April 1761 which delivd. to J. Moore to return. He retd. and paid a better recd. from them.
Nov. x 18. Write to Nicholson for everlastg. breeches—purple do.—Chamois drawers.
Write to John May to apply to Tazewell for money, bond & copy judgmt. in Grattan v. Waterson x bond and copy judgmt. not sent to me—C.D.41 papers in Hite v. Fairfax and Hanbury v. Claiborne—C.D.—to search in Bowyer v.    .
x rd Send sp. bail in Temple v. Bowyer.
x r Dismiss Mills v. Huston at def.’s cost & send bill of costs.
x Henderson v. Anderson. Dismiss.
x c Galloway v. Burnley. Exn.
x r Hickman v. Harper. Pl. Sci. fa. Ws. retd.
x r Moore v. Hogg. Exn. for costs.
x r Wood v. Halcomb. No instructions.42
x n Hughes v. Johnson. Summs.
x n Calvard v. Thompson. Summs.
x n Pleasants v. May.
x n Cuyder v. Christian. Send Sp. bail and cause of action decln.
x r Mutter & Co. v. Pasteur.
x n Handcock v. Walker. [Enter caveat?] & Summs.
x n Carr v. Smith. Caveat & Sum.
x n Luney v. Meets. Caveat & Sum.
x n Compton v. Clarke. Petn. & Sum.
x n Mcbride v. Oneal. Do. No patt. to be found.42
x n Cowden v. Brush. Caveat & Sum.
x n Greenlee v. Gray. Send Summs.
x n Smith v. Woods. Return Cap. and send Al. Cap.
x n Id.43 v. McDowel. Writ in TAB.
 
x Write to G. W. in Buchanan v. Bowan, Hite & Fairfax, Crawford v. Archer.
x to Rind for Almanack44[terms?] offerd.
x to T. Nelson
x to J. May further RD Frame v. Burnside. Dismiss and [st.?] of costs.
x d Hickman v. Harper. Qu. if return. If not Pl[. . . .]45
x cd Mclure v. Smith. Id. v. McGill. What are words?
x cd Stewart v. Gwinn & Heron. What words.
x Ask at S. O. for the patent of Hierom Gaines assignee of several mesne assignments46 of David Willis for 125 acres. Cannot be found.47
Collect 30/ of Daniel Banter for William Graegg, who gave me his order.
x Send copy of works in Handcock v. Walker to Roger Thompson.
Dec. 12. 1768. Write to J. May.
x
 Johnson v. Patterson. } Return Summs.
 Smith v. Patteson.
x
x Bowyer v. Walker. Ask date of patent & Summs. Answ. pat. Nov. 3. 1750. Summs. June 13. 1768.
x Bowyer v. Buchanan. Enter petn. & Summs.
x Mayo v. Lewis. Send sp. bail.
x Witt v. Biby. Enter caveat & Summs.
x Devire v. Daniel. Writ. Case Dam. 500£.
x Mem. write to Francis Mcbride in Mcbride v. Oneal.
x Greenlee v. Gray. Inclose to M. Bowyer.48
x Cowden v. Brush. Do.
x Compton v. Clarke. Do.
x Luney v. Meets. Do.
x Hogg v. Moore. Do.
x Galloway v. Burnley. Inclose to Sh. of Orange.
Handcock v. Walker. Inclose to Rog. Thompson.
Carr v. Smith. Deliver to J. Marks.
Smith v. Woods.
 
x Calvard v. Thompson. Inclose to <Thompson> Calvard.
x Hughes v. Johnson. Inclose to Hughes.
Mclure  v. Smith. } Inclose to Smith.
v. McGill.
Stuart v. Heron. Inclose to J. Madison.
Buchanan v. Bowan. Write to M. Bowyer to give notice.
x Richd. Durrett, senr. x Will. Lewis Ivy creek subscribe for Rind’s paper x & B. Sneed, and x Joseph Hale and x Henry Mullins x T. Terry and x John Forsie x Micajah Clarke junr.
[Dec. 17]49 x Mem. Stuart v. Heron is that pl. being sworn in [Stuart?] v. Gwin not on a voire dire; def. said ‘pl. was sworn on voire dire and swore he was not to gain or lose by the event of the cause, when he was a partner with Gwin and was to gain or lose half with him, and has since demanded £11. of Gwin for half the gain.’
x Mclure v. Smith. The words are ‘the pl. was discovered by a neighbor who had often before missed corn out of his feild together with five horses eating and destroying the corn in the said feild.’ Also ‘I saw the pl. rejected just now as a juryman and in a short time he will become so well known that he will not be admitted any where as a witness.’
x Mclure v. McGill. That the def. informed Samuel Briggs who was security for the pl. that Colo. Abr. Smith had sued pl. and before next day would sell every thing he was worth to satisfy the debt, and advised Brigg to secure himself; where[as] Brigg and many other creditors sued him, and he lost his credit.

[1769]

x Jan. 22. Enquire at S. O. for a writ of A. Q. D. which docked about 500 acres entailed on Aaron Quarles who thereon sold to Fitzgerald. The writ sent out about 20 years ago. Take down the courses the jury run and send to James Quarles.
Feb. [ ] x Write to W. Rind for [4?] quire declns. for J. Harvie.50
Mar. 9. Return Lambard’s works & money and get patent.51
Pay Ben Taylor’s money for rights &c. £3–1–2.
x Send Andrew Wallace’s advertisemt.52 and money 5/ to printing office. Recd. in return 1/ overplus.
x Isaac Davies subscribes for two of Rind’s papers.
Present petn. of Crawford & others to Governor.53
x Send Coffey’s advertisemt.54 and money 4/ to Rind.
March 16. Write to McCaul for 36 ells oznabr.55 for 4 pr. sheets.
x 6 Dutch blankets56
16 yds. coarse Dowlas57 for Jupiter.58
x broadcloth for myself.
x black everlastg.
cotton stockings.
silk do.
x buck skin gloves.
buck handle knives and forks
x 8 yds. long lawn
x Sum. clothes for Jupiter.
scarlet cloth for waistcoats.
x linen for drawers
µέτρον δ᾿ ἐπι πἄσιν ἄριστον59 no liberty, no life60
ἀνέχου ϰαι ἀπέχου61 bonum quod honestum62
 
in se ipso totus teres atque rotundus63 Macte virtute esto.64
οἰστέον ϰαι ἐλπιστέον65 Nil desperandum.66
faber suae quisque fortunae.67 un dieu, un roy.68
fari quae sentiat69 what is, is right.70
ex recto decus71 οὐδέις οὐδαµοῦ72
ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito73
x Send Chas. Lewis’s advertisemt. to Rind.74
Recd. of C. Lewis 5/ but Rind retd. 1/ overplus.
x Get Greenlee’s money from the treasurer75 on the certificate he gave me. Got it, and after paying his works retd. surplus 12/6 to him.
x Return for him his plot, and pay rights fees &c. out of money to be recd. of treasurer.
x Get for T. Woodson76 2 quires writs 1 do. of orphan’s bonds. Gave me 10/.
x Get a copy of David Crawford’s will from Sec.’s office for William Ter. Lewis. No such will to be found in S. O.
April 6. Pd. Treasurer John Clarke’s 4£ also 20/ more, the treasurer not knowing his ballance. Note if this is too much Clarke must let it be applied to credit of some other Sheriff who may repay him, as the treasurer will not alter his books to make a new entry.
Mem. send Thompson Mason77 20 bushels of spring wheat to Fredericksburg to the care of James Mercer.
Inclose to G. Donald the following dimensions for Readg. desk.78
height where highest <5.f.> 4 f. 4 I.
breadth of top 1 f. 3 I.
breadth of lid or slope 22 I. i.e. from top of list on wch. book [sits?]
Wrote to
G. Donald.
height from top of list to the floor <4.f. 2.I.> 3 f. 9½ I.
length from end to end 5 f.
<to have [Chinese?] railing at the back and ends of top [. . .] >
June 9. Wrote to Apollos Cooper at Mr. Carter’s Loudon.
Lay in stock agt. assocn.79
paint and oil and putty.
x black cloth [. . .] 2 ℔ powder and 8 ℔ shot
velvet  x wafers  x ½ doz. Dutch blankets.
* 2 ps. linen linen @ 3/9  x 12 yds. Dowlas & qu. as to former.
* 8 yds. cambrick  x 4 gross velvet corks.
x 4 pr. black silk stockings
bottles
* 1 doz. hkcheifs.
tea  x 6 ℔ coffee  x coffee cups & saucers  x sugar.
x 1 ream paper  Write about my books.
x 8 yds. long lawn.
* scarlet cloth for waistcoat.
x 1 doz. [pewter?] plates  x 1 doz. knives & forks.
1 [. . .]80x 32 gal. molasses & linen for G. Dudl[ey]81
2 doz. [. . .]
* 3 doz. glass tumblers ½ pint
2 glass [. . .]
* 2 looking glasses  Send P. Coutt’s book.82
Tell G. Jones Everard will sell servt. He cannot shave or dress, and games a little which is cause of selling. He will take 80£. 20 years old. Sensible enough.
Dick v. Stewart. No such deposn. as Mclanahan’s filed.
Send Mrs. Chiswell83 7 oz. yellow silk from Charlottesville, not doubled and twisted. It is to stripe cloth, the deepest yellow half, and the other half lighter.
x Ask for Willm. Aylett’s pat. for 99 acres Augusta. Works retd. about 7 years ago. J. May sais not to be found and that he must send receipt.84
x Return Harrison’s works. Did by S. Lewis.
Return Shelt[man’s?], Ragan’s, & Werin’s works and £8–12–6. Did it by Sam. Lewis.
x Stockdon v. Brenton. A petn. entered last March. Send for new Summs. and contrive it to Hampshire by Capt. Hogg.
Write to clerk of Amherst for copy record in Ballow v. Wright.
x Return Alexr. White’s works and pay the money viz. £3–1–2 to S. O. myself + 10/6 to Walthoe.
Send to Rind ———-’s advertisement and money and write to him about Is. Davis’s papers.
Madison v. Johnson. Carry papers to Augusta court.
Mills v. Huston. Do.
[c. July 5]85 x Devire v. Daniel. Send decln. x Ballow v. Wright. Copy record.
x Jefferson v. Hanson. Send copy decln.
x Cuningham v. Duke. x Napier v. Hulsey.
x Ford v. Millar. x Strange v. Murril.
x Cabell v. Lee & al. x id. v. Woodie et al.
x Mead v. Williamson et al. x Johnston v. Walmsley  Young v. Waterson.
x
Pleasants  v. John May.
v. Joshua May.
x
x Gordon v. Broyls.
x Handcock v. Walker.
x Carr v. Smith.
x Luney v. Meets.
x Douglass v. Mousley.
x Matthews v. Riley.
x McCue v. Patten.
x Spiers v. Langford.
Virginia cloth86
2 suits curtains
4 tufted coverlids
2 bed ticks
1 coat and breeches of Jeans
2 waistcoats of dimity87
1 coat and breeches of fustian for self.
1 suit do. for Jupiter
1 suit do. for Peter.88
 yds. diaper
Have J. Coles89 appointed overseer in the room of John Fortune on the Green Mountain road from Ballenger’s creek to Hardware.
Send Rob. Harris’s advertmt. and 4/ to Rind. Did it by R. Anderson.
x Wm. Hickman subscribes for Rind’s Gazette and Charles Patrick also.
x Return Isaiah Curry’s works and 22/2.
x Ask for Rob. Napier’s pat. for 400 acres on Cary creek Albemarle. Works retd. Aug. 19. 1768. Recd. it by Mr. Moore’s boy.90
Aug. 19. Delivd. Mrs. Chiswell’s memdm. for Amherst suits to J. Harvie.
x Ask for Richd. Stockdon’s pat. for 400 acres on Mechum’s river Albemarle. J. May sais not to be found and that he must send receipt.90
x Return Burger’s works and 16/4.
Bowyer v. Moore. A caveat entered about May 23. Search if works retd. Def. sais they are. J. May sais the land is patd.
x Return David Frame’s works for 98 acres and 22/2 but enquire first if caveat entered. Also get copy order of conc. v. Warwic for 50. acres and pay 10/6 to Walthoe and 16/4 to S. O.
x Return Hugh Devire’s works and 16/4.
x Deliver T. Lewis’s 50/ to G. W.
x Return Shannon’s works and 22/2 but enquire first if caveat entered.
Send the patents in Mclure v. Poag to S. Matthews.
x Robert Logan subscribes for Rind’s papers.
J. May writes me word that Waterson took out of my letter Isaiah Curry’s works and 22/2 so I have entered a friendly caveat in the name of Hugh Donaghe for it.90
Nathan Reddy indebted to Ambrose Dowel 4£. Dowel is run away. Mem. write attamt. for him and leave at J. Walker[’s.]91
Get three quire attamts. and attamt. bonds for J. Walker, as many for myself.92
Also 4 quire for R. Harvie.93
Get a brass point for a franklin94 for R. Harvie.
Got it. Ask for Wm. Venable’s patt. Works retd. 2 or 3 years ago.
Mem. get in Wmsburgh. 2000 tacks for putting in window glass, 500 do. for nailing on the pully lines & loops for 10 pr. window shutters to draw them open.
Sep. 13. Delivd. Mr. Carr95 Mrs. Elizab. Chiswell’s list of lands in wch. she claims dower in Albemarle. He is to charge no fee where he loses cause. A principal paper is wanting here as well as in Amherst, to wit Chiswell’s deed to Robinson. I must be sure to get [it] from S. O. and have it at our Nov. court.
Ask for Henry Tilley’s pat. for 400 acres Albemarle. Works retd. April 27. 1758. Got it.96
Apply to Treasurer with Geo. Douglass’s certif. for 700 ℔ hemp and receive money. Recd. 25/. 17/6 of it burned in the house.1
Ask for John Rodes’s pat. for 50 acres on the waters of Moreman’s river. Works retd. 2 or 3 years ago.
1 quire of attamts. and 1 quire of attamt. bonds for Chas. Lewis.2
x Return J. Madison’s works for 210, [ ] & 75 acres and £6–7.
Ask Chas. Lambert when it was Mr. Ramsay3 got drunk with the sacrament wine going to Clairmont church.
Ask T. Woodson to search the records for the time when Joanna Collins (then Joanna Plummer) complained agt. Ramsay, and was sold by ord. Court.
Ask for Thos. Smith’s pat. for 87 acres Albemarle on the head of Mechum’s river. Works retd. about 3 years ago. Got certificate that is recorded in S. O.
Purchase Pilgrim’s progr. for G. Twyman who gave me 5/9.
Speak to Rind about T. Carr’s4 12/6 for first year’s gazette, which he sais he gave me to pay Rind, yet there is come up an acct. agt. him. Also pay him 12/6 for second year 10/ of which T. Carr delivd. me. Rind admits the rect.5
x Return Sam. Gay’s works &c. 38/6.
Ask for Ezekiah Inman’s patent for 393 acres in Albemarle. Works retd. Apr. 16. 1767.6
x Deliver Orlando Jones’s letter and 5/ to Rind. If more wanting I am to pay it.
Take Jo. Hornsby’s depon. in the case of Scott v. Hall left to arbitration. The point to be proved is Whether James Bray Johnston is or was good for 78£ and interest. Send it to Mr. Scott to care of Jas. [. . . .].
Get Willoughby Pugh’s pat. for 99 acres in the rich cove Albemarle. Works retd. about 1763. Got certif. that is recorded. Also get Maxwell’s pat. See assmt. from Pugh.6
Enter friendly caveat John Fitzpatrick v. Joseph Fitzpat. for 226 acres in the forks of Hardware on the head of the Walnut branch between the lands of Thos. Fitzp. and Sam Gay Albem. Note I am emploied by Wilkerson in former caveat agt. this land, so cannot do anything here but as a friend. Recd. 11/ so return 2/9 after paying tax and fee for Summs.
Return George Dudley’s works and pay £2–15–4 for him.
Send to Rind  ’s (J. Scott’s I believe) letter and 5/. If any more wanting I will pay it.
Deliver N. Lewis’s7 12/6 to Rind.

            Walls8 
To be grouted.
Openings for windows 4 f. 4 I. – 1 inch for two rabbets by 7 f. 3½ I. – ½ inch one rabbet.
Opening for sash 2 f. 10316 I. from floor.
Opening for pedastal9 2 f. 3316 I. – 2 I. = 2 f. 1316 I. from floor.
Sleepers, joists &c. not to be let into wall, but laid on, and small space left between wall & end.
Stock bricks for outside rubbed before burnt.10
Note. I do not find that the mouldings of the capital are ever given to the wall, but I observe that the upper mouldings of the base of the shaft, and sometimes a bare zocco11 only are given to the wall of the house and sometimes nothing at all, and qu. which handsomest?12
Have hidden arches over doors and windows to prevent door and window frames from too great pressure.

            Doors 
To be pannelled on both side.
10 peices 8 by 10 I. 8½ f. long. + 16. for O. H.13
7 do. 8 by 10. 5½ f. long. + 14 for O. H.
For no. & disposn. of panels see Pall.14 B. 4. Pl. 36. Must be 6. only.
For proportn. of panel to border see do. Pl. 72.
For moulding on edge of border see do. Pl. 60.
Bottom pannel range with pannelling of wainscoat.
Style of door 2⅛ I. thick. The panel may sink ¼ inch on each side. By Saunders.15
Style has ogee, fillet, quarter round.
Panel has fillet, quarter round, fillet, faint hollow, [birch?]

            Roofs 
External covering of plank put on with their ends up and down. To be tongued and planed.
Rafter for every joist. Joists twice their thickness apart.
Rafters to be supported by framed work.

            Windows.16 
Outside architraves locust or cedar 7 I. by 10. I.
<6> [24?] peices f. 5½ long + 8 four17 outhouses. 12. do. 8½ f. long + 8 for O. H.
Frize solid of chesnut or cedar. 6½ I. by 4¼ inches. 6 peices 5½ f. long.
Cornices solid, of chesnut. 11½ I. by 8½ I. 6 peices 7 f. long.
Cap of base for bottom of window. 8 I. by 4 I. 6 peices 5½ f. long + 4 for O. H.
Pullies to be covered by under sash.
<Upper and under sash joined with a rabbet.>18
x Upper bar of under sash to have quarter round on it’s upper edge.
Opening in wall = 
Chimneys. funnels 9 I. sq. to be contained in thickness of wall.
To be ensured from smoaking.
Note I have sent for architraves 7. I. broad, 2 jambs for the inside 3 f. 6 I. long, 2 f. broad, and 2 I. thick: two plinths or pedestals for the architraves 5¼ I. high, and 7712 I. broad: also one peice 57⅙ by 18 I. to lay before the hearth. All these of black marble. One peice of firestone 44 I. by 26 I. for the hearth.
The arriere corps of the architrave 8 I. wide, which with architrave makes the jaumb 15 I. thick. Deducting from this the thickness of the marble for the jaumb, to wit, 2 I. leaves brick work 13 I. thick.
Brickwork of fire place open in the clear 3 f. 6 I. high, 3. f. 10 I. wide. 
Rooms of principal house. The pedestal & entablature of each contain about 68. sq. yds.
The entabl. of the roof including pediment 55 sq. yds.
68 × two rooms = 136 } write to Campbell19 for 400 lib. white lead, 50 galls. oil.
55 × 4 roofs = 220
add for contingencies 44
400
Bricks 3, 4, and 9 inches (note Rosewell20 brick 2½, 4, 8½.)
Outhouses 18. f. sq. 10. f. to water table. 12. f. upper story.
To water table.
Each side 180. sq. f. – 9 = 171. × 4 sides = 684 sq. f.
2 bricks thick will be 24. to the sq. foot. 24 × 684 = 16,416 bricks
Upper story.
Each side 216. sq. f. – 18 = 198. 198 × 4 sides = 792. sq. f. 1½ brick thick will be 18. to the sq. foot. 18 × 792 = 14,256. bricks
16,416 + 14,256 (= 30,672.) × 2 houses = 61,344 bricks. Of these 20,180 stockbricks: 41,164 place bricks.
Principal building. Wings. 18.f. sq. To water table 10. f. 1st. order 18. f.
To water table.
Each side 180. sq. f. – 9 = 171.
Thickest side 3 bricks thick will be 36. to sq. foot. 36 × 171 = 6,156. bricks. Qu. if not better to have this wall 3½ thick.
Other 3 sides 2½ thick. 30. to sq. foot. 171 × 3 sides = 513 sq. feet. 513 × 30 = 15,390. bricks
6,156 + 15,390 = 21,546 bricks to raise to water table.
First order
Each side 324 sq. f. – 28 = 296.
Thickest side 2½ bricks thick is 30. to sq. f. 30 × 296 = 8,880. bricks. Qu. if not better to have this 3. bricks thick.
Other 3 sides 2. thick. 24. to sq. f. 296. sq. f. × 3 = 888. 888 × 24 = 21,312.
8,880 + 21,312 = 30,192. bricks for 1st. order.
30,192 + 21,546 (= 51,738.) × 2. wings = 103,476 bricks.
Of these must be 18,096 stock bricks for 6 sides. 85,380 place bricks.
In the whole 38,276 stock bricks + 126,544 place bricks = 164,820.
But note if two inner walls 3½ thick to wat. table, and 3. to first order, it will take 5604 bricks more.21 
Send for cartridge paper to color on for room. It comes in quires. Each sheet 18 I. sq. costs 1/ a quire. 25. quire will give a dble. coat to my dining room, so send for 3 reams.
Verditer blue.
Prussian blue.
Spanish white.
Cuttings of white leather to make a size to prevent it’s rubbing off.22
Paper machee, white. It costs about 2d a foot. 250 f. do for my dining room, so send for 250.
Sheet lead is about 116 of an inch thick, and 2d pr. ℔.
Kidd23 sells for 4d pr. ℔. and can run as thin as 3 ℔. to the foot.
A leaden pipe of 4 inches bore wd. be about 10d pr. foot sterl.
Rolls to hang paper on, yard wide, 10d sterlg. p. yd.
Spoke to Kidd. For cornice will take sheets of lead 2 f. wide 128 f. long besides the doublings of joints.
For cap of Attic sheets 11.I. broad 128 f. long besides doublings.
For cornice of 6 windows, 6 sheets 9.I. broad 6 f. long.
<Decoration of paper machee for cieling 14 f. 4 I. sq. in compartmts. in taste of the>
Send for Aeolian harp24 3 f.—refracting telescope 8 Venetian blinds25—case pocket instr.—✓ 15 pr. shutter rings—✓ Back gammon tab.—✓ Chess board & men.—✓ pr. scales. Scotch carpet26 17 f. 3 I. sq.
Decoration of paper machee for a ceiling 14 f. 4 I. sq.
Divided into 6 + 2 compartments and resembling as much as may be Gibbs’ rules for drawg.27 pl. 58. upper figure, & Palladio B. 4. Pl. 26. fig. C.D.F.

            Kitchen28 
From top of wat. table to floor 11.f. 4.I.
From do. to surface of upper level 2 f. 7 I.
Leaves upper fall 8 f. 9 I.
Breadth of kitchen below wat. table 20 f. 8.8 I.
Lower level 50 f. broad + <18> 17 f. 6. I. basis of upper fall. 
Octob. 2. 1769. Left out 5½ doz. bottles of beer.
Liquors left eodem tempore in cellar.
L.29 69. 146 + 102. bottles
M. 15. bottles
R. 64. 65. R. 67. 3. R. 69. 16
C. 21.
x Return Galaspy’s works & 16/4.
x Return Carrigan’s works & 16/4.
x Return Galloway’s works and £3–18–8.
x Return Estill’s, x Bowin’s, x Lewis’s, x Conrad’s, x Simmon’s, x do.’s, x McKittrick’s, x Heine’s, x R[eash?]’s works and £13–4.
Send by James Ogilvie30 for x 2 pr. rising dovetail door hinges—x 2 <Venetian> Chinese bells brass with wire and cranks—x 3 bells with wire and crank—x thermometer—x case of bottles & canister (if acts repealed)31x music for spinet and violin—x strings for violoncello—pullies, cord &c. for Venetian blinds—x chain for a jack—x canvas—x glass cylinders & candlesticks—x stocklocks ✓ locks of the mortise kind.—a Scotch carpet 17 f. 3 sq.  Calender32 for pressing clothes.
Get 2 ℔. stocking thread for Col[onel] [Bur?]well @ 20/ the pound.
[Nov.]33 I have promised Mrs. F. Page the white silk I was to have of Mrs. Anderson.
Get Almanack of Rind.
Dimensions for a skyow.34
Length 23 f.—breadth 6 f. 4 I.—depth 12 I.
Colo. Val. Wood subscribes toward clearing the Rivanna35 3£ also T. M. Randolph36 10£ more.

[1770]

Jan. 7. 1770. On my return home found my liquor in the cellar as follows.
Loss
L.69. 221  bottles 27 . bottles Of these 26 of the bottles were left empty. The other 89 were carried off or broke.
M. 5 10
R. 64. 13 71
C. 14 7
x Send to S. O. for George Dudley’s patent for 100 acres on Rackoon creek Albemarle surveied about 1752 or 1753. Qu. if the gov. entitled to a fee?37 and what has been pd. thereon.
Write to Steptoe38 to send Sums. in Johnston v. Hawkins for Bowyer et ux. directed to Coroner, and erase their names in those directed to sheriff.
[c. Mch. 1]39 Send by W. Beck40 for Bantam—x pomegranate41x nectarine from G.W.—x locks &c. from Secr.—x artichokes.
Send Rastall, Tucker’s bill—x G. Dudley’s land42
Enquire about Terry v. Jordan—x write to Purdie43 to know what Colo. Lewis’s books bindg. cost44x also for Pilgr. progr. and [. . .]’s book bd.—send wheat—x sd. for Virga. laws45x saddle—x shoes—x electrical points46—send gazettes to be bd.—x boat locks—x candlestick—x white apples— x papers Clarke v. Fargeson x Madison v. Adams. Sum.—x Sandidge v. Moore. day? gum mastic47x bedstead—
Work to be done at <Hermitage> Monticello.48
 
Plant raspberries—gooseberries—currans—strawberries—asparagus—artichokes—fill up trees—sow grass—henhouse—cherry tree—Lucerne—road—waggoning wood and sand—lop cherry trees—49
x Jo. Hale is to be discontinued as a subscriber to the Virginia gazette, and I am to pay Rind for his last year’s paper and charge it to Joanne Collins.
x John Madison junr. v. Mary Adams (  ). Enter petn. for 340 acres Augusta same as already petned. for by Daniel Smith v. Robert Patterson. Enter a petn. and get Sum. for pl. Note as I am emploied for Smith I do not undertake this petn. They must search in the office whether the works and patents agree. Answ. they do.
The new canal50 which it will be necessary to open from my pier head down, will be 150 yds. in length and 9 f. deep (by rough measuring). If 3 f. wide at bottom and 6 f. at top it will be 675 cubical yds. of earth to dig. To continue the canal up to the falls above the landing (which would render my mill dam unnecessary) would be 450 yds., about 50. of which would be 9 f. deep, the remaining 400 wd. be 6 f. deep. If made 3. f. wide at bottom and 6 f. at top it will require 1425 cubical yds. to be dug.
Witt v. Biby. Get the patent. See post.51
Ask for John Rodes (in the rect. called Bodes) pat. for 50 acres Albem. Works retd. Dec. 9. 1762. Rect. signed Wm. Tunstall. Got it & delivd.
Return Wm. Myass’s works and 55/4 for 180 acres.
Madison v. Brooks and Blackwell. A suit brot. on a bond 4 or 5 years ago. Enquire why not tried and forward it. Direct a fi. fa.
Got it. Get Robert Young’s pat. for the 137 acres of his wch. Waterson caveated. If we can get this patent it will arm Young with title and as the caveat was only agt. Patterson and the works retd. in Young’s name it ought to issue.
Get C. Maupin’s £3 of J. Bolling52 £3–2–1½.
[Mch. 29]53 Rachl. Morrison to be discontd. with Rind’s paper.
Dispose of Mr. Lewis’s negro.
Wrote to Mr. Lewis. Enquire of R. C. Nich. wheth. the money he undertook to see pd. to the Aud.54 for sher. Alb. by the last of the Gen. ct. next is payd. by any of the und. sher. If nt. get of Prentis the sums payd. by the difft. und. sher. fr. 68.  for N. Lewis. Write ans. by W. [Beck?].
Direct Pendleton and Wythe to oppose J. Moore’s motn. for leave to clear ford.55
Get a pr. curls for A. S. Jefferson ordered to measure.
Lewis v. Jones’s heirs. Get a copy of bill for Mrs. Ware guardian to def. Desire J.B.56 to send up commn. to exam. witn. by me.
Get 2 bushels of timothy seed for Mr. Wythe and send next fall and Prussian fowls and pigeons.57
Witt and Biby. The pl. must return works & copy ord. counc. Told him.
John Haydon. Get copy of courses of 350 acres Albem. on No. river patd. by Thos. Randolph from patent book. No such patent.
x Enquire of Ro. C. Nich. for what suggestions he moved to have Mat. Moore struck out of the venire and Charles Lambard inserted on an indictment v. Sheetes in April 1767 or 68. He does not remember.
Ask J. Blair for commn. in Madison v. Adams.
Pay Robt. Frazier’s 27/6 q. rents at Auditor’s office and take rect.
Get scale and dividers for R. Adams. Countmdd.
x Deliver J. May’s money to Everard.58 Did so.
Bring blk. spas. in Woods v. Sandige.
Enter security for J. M. in Richmd. v. Sutton. Did.
Wm. Shelton’s papers are misdirected by Rind.
Wm. Harris, Wm. Rocks & Richard Bruce subscribe for his gazette. Did.
Dun Southall for J.B.59
Remember to enquire for Morrison’s land on Rockfish to dower in which Mrs. Chiswell is entitled.60
July 28. Sold R. Harvie 3013 ℔. transfer tobo.61 for £30–2–7 paiable  . Note this is county tobo. wth. wch. I am to purchase books fr. court.62
Apply with Coleman’s affidavit to Capt. Hogg and Colo. Washington that his propn. of lands may be settled. Do it before Octob. 10. Delivd. to Colo. Wash. Coleman must contribute 20/.63
George Malcomb’s do. to Colo. Washington. Delivd. to Colo. Washington. He sais every com. soldier to pay 20/ xpce.64
George Douglass senr. Enquire what was the name of a capt. of a ship who broke Gloster. jail in May or June last and carried off Douglass’s servt.64
Return Witt’s works & money. Done & took rect.65
Write to Wmsburgh. by T. West.
To Lew. Burwell66
To Pelham67 for commns. + dedimus commn. to swear Lieutt. at Ct. must[er].68
To Steptoe.69 Witt’s works—and Jones’s—McCulloh’s
Daugherty v. Buster. Writ.
Davis v. Cox. Ent. petn. & sd. Sum.70
Strange v. Wooddie. Do.
Fretwell v. Burton. Do.
Reid’s cases. Sum.
Beard v. Hogg. Hab. corp. if not sent.
Daugherty v. Daugherty. Writs.
Coles v. Coles. Spa. in Canc.
  Lasly  v. Ragland. Enter it exactly.
v. Morris. Spa. ad test.
Mclanahan v. Hartsough. 2 petns.
Galaspy v. Wilson.
Rose v. Lifely.
Bowyer v. Welsh. 2 petns.
To Alexr. for papers wantg.
[Aug.21-25] Ask at S. O. for Samuel Clarke’s patent for lands he recovd. of Coffey. He now lives in Augusta.71
Enquire of Mr. Waller72 or Everard what is done to relieve H. Rose73 who was com. bail for G. Seaton ads. Knox’s assees. The sp. bail peice ws. delivd. at S. O. by Alexr. McCaul and lost. Mr. Waller it is said promises to indemnify him.74
Enquire what arrears are due for John Hinton’s 236 as. Aug. Enq. at Aud.’s office and <let Hinton know. Also pay his 21/6 gov.’s fee for his patent & take it out.> pay them out of his 21/6. Take rects. fr. particular years. Cd. nt. fd. anything of pat. so retd. 21/6 to Ewen.74
Speak to Atty. Gen. for Atty.’s place in the new county75 that will be on New river and get promise for T. Madison. The atty. promises it and sais will make memm.76
Return Mr. Jones’s ord. conc. and see if I have not the works. If I have not they are in the office returned by Colo. Lewis. I shall advance this money. I have them.
Send to S. O. for Thos. McCulloh’s pat. for 63 as. Alb. Work retd. May 1769. Nt. made out.
Speak to TMR for Mat. Moore who wd. undertake to shew or sell his Pittsylva. lands, can survey them &c. Does not intend to sell.
Return Sam Wood’s works & £3–1–2. Done and took receipt.
Get copy of Venable’s patent issd. abt. 18 months ago.
George Campbell who holds lands out of wch. Mrs. Chiswell is entitled to dower, agrees to pay 19 viz. £3–1 when ever a title shall be made, for which Sam Woods is security.77
Get memm. book—Glass’s cookery78—scrubbg. brush 6 doz. strong wood screws for hinges wth. flat tops—key[ring?] curran jelly—steelyard—lampblack—79
Get copy ord. conc. McCue v. Patton & 2 rts.80
Pay Rind 12/6 for Harry Mullins. Pd. to Mullins.81
Get Farrar’s hemp money 1003 ℔. hemp.82 Lodgd. wth. R.C.N.83 money.
Enquire if John Gibbins tavern keeper in York is dead? Also whether has left will &c. Ben Calvert pretends right to 8 of his slaves under the gift of Jno. Butterworth gr. fath. of Calvert. The act of limns. is agt. him.84
Madison v. Brooks. When Mercer gets judgmt. he must take out exn. fi. fa. and receive the money [. . .] and pay to Gab. Jones.85
Lawrence v. Johnson. A petn. about 2 y. ago. Atty. empld. for pl. Qu. what has done with it, and inform Watt Mousley.85
Sandidge et al. v. Lewis. Get copy of order ct. for N. Lewis.
I am to attend at Amherst C. H. on the 7th. of January to receive money for the Honble. Wm. Nelson.86 Give day till April on good assurance of paimt. then. All not pd. bring suits in Gn. C. Whatever money I receive, write to Mr. Nelson and if he thinks worth while he will send for it. Recd. bond &c.
2 fillets, 2 aigrettes for A. S. Jeff.87
[Dec.]88 Clavichord, or clarichord. Compass from Double G. to F in alt. To be made for holding in the lap, or laying on a table, as light and portable as possible. The wood dead vineered over with the finest mahogany. The keys ivory. Flats and sharps tortoise shell. As few strings as possible for the compass, i.e. some make one string do for 2 or 3 keys, others put a string for every key, which is not so well. To be made at Hamburgh in Germany. Plenty of spare strings sorted. Every possible precaution to prevent the rattling of the keys.
Four good fellows, a lad & two girls of abt. 16. each in 8½ hours dug in my cellar89 of mountain clay a place 3.f. deep, 8 f. wide & 16½ f. long = 14⅔ cubical yds. under these disadvantages, to wit: a very cold snowy day which obliged them to be very often warming; under a cover of planks, so low, that in about half the work their stroke was not more than ⅔ of a good one; they eat their breakfast in the time which one of them went to cook; they were obliged to keep one or two constantly hawling away the earth to prevent it’s rolling in again. From this I think a <tolerable> midling hand in 12. hours (including his breakfast) would dig & haul away the earth of 4 cubical yds., in the same soil.
In digging my dry well,90 at the depth of 14 f. I observed one digger, one filler, one drawer at the windlace with a basket at each end of his rope very accurately gave one another full emploiment, but note it was a yellow rotten stone with a great many hard stones as large as a man’s head and some larger, or else the digger would have had time to spare. They dug and drew out 8. cubical yds. in a day.91 
Long life, long health, long pleasures & a friend. Pope.92 
The sleepy eye that speaks the melting soul. Pope.93 
Let day improve on day, and year on year;
Without a pain, a trouble, or a fear. Pope. 
Non solum nobis, sed patriae.94  
Fiat justitia, ruet coelum.95 
 
 
 The breadth of this bridge1 is about 60 feet at narrowest. The top of it is very uneven and rocky. Many large trees growing on it. At the bottom by the waterside is a tree growing which when you are under it appears to be a tall tree, but when on the bridge you find that it scarcely reaches more than half way. <On each side of> The bridge is onerock of limestone. The bridge itself and each ab[ut]ment seems to be solid, but a little above and below it has large cracks, and there seems to be large peices quite loose and there may be some danger. Just where the bridge joins to the precipice at g. it <juts out> hangs over more than common, there grows a cluster of cedars. The rock has broken away from under them to <within> a crust of a few feet in thickness which seems to hold to the precipice by a small peice and that cracked so that it will probably fall in it’s time. The stream is so small in dry weather that it would pass thro’ a hole a foot sq. where runs moderately and being very rocky it is not rapid. The precipices on the upper side continue perpendicular <out of sight> a considerable distance and between them you see the N. mountain at the distance of of about 5 miles. One of the precipices does the same on lower side. The other also a little way, and from that wears off more gradually and here you d[iscern?] large rocks below which seem to fallen2 from sides. Thro these you see Blue Ridge about 5 miles distance. Water dis[ ]s from sides guttatim. Spring or head about 2 miles above. Large collections of brush and logs, as also <peices> planks of a mill on the stream above show there are considerable floods. Stone descended in about 4 or 6 pulsations of the flood. In sides of precipice tho’ rather impending wherever a little level of very few feet, perhaps 4 or 5 f. wide, there are cedars growing.

[1767]3

Aug. 18. Recd. of W. Bowan for law fund4 10/9.—recd. of J. Tilleroy for do. 30/.
Aug. 19. Pd. Mr. Madison5 for clube6 in punch 1/6.
Recd. of T. Stockdon for law fund 10/—of R. Galaspy for do. 2/6.—of H. Paulin do. 52/6.
20. Recd. of D. Frame for do. 8/6.
21. Inclosed by Mr. Henry to Mrs. Wallace being one half the money for diaper bought of Mrs. Wood 3 lib. 10.
22. Pd. W. Cunningham for pasturage 5/.
Pd. Washing woman at Staunton 1/.
Gave servt. at T. Bowyer’s7 1/3.
Pd. at Steele’s tavern 2/10.
23. Pd. at Paxton’s8 for entertainmt. 2/6.
Pd. a guide 2/6.
24. Pd. at Milam’s for entertainment 5/.
 
25. Pd. a tailor 1/.
Recd. of E. Pharr for law fund 20/.
26. Pd. Thorpe9 for entertainment 25/.
Pd. a smith for shoeing my horse 5/.
27. Pd. ferriage at Lynch’s10 1/3.
Pd. for dinner &c. at Penn’s11 5/.
28. Pd. at Kee’s12 for entertainmt. 5/.
30. Pd. at Orange C. house for entertainmt. 2/6.
31. Pd. at Culpepper C. H. for do. 4/9.
Pd. at Moore’s for do. 2/6.
Sep.  1. Pd. at Painter’s for do. 2/.
 2. Pd. at Bruin’s in Winchester 24/3.
 3. Pd. at Berry’s13 for ferriage & entertt. 8/.
Pd. at Fauquier C. H.14 for entertt. 4/.
 4. Pd. at Gray’s at Culpepper C. H. for do. 5/6.
Pd. at Bell’s at Orange C. H. for do. 4/.
Pd. at Shepard’s store for a knife 1/3.
 6. Pd. a negro of N. Meriwether’s15 for 2½ qts. goose grass seed 6/4½.
11. Steward Carrol’s work on the slope16 comes to 27/.
13. Pd. a negro of N. Meriwether’s for 3. qts. Timothy seed 3/.
16. Gave B. Calvert17 a promisory note for lib. 2–7/ for taylor’s work.
17. My dues in Fredericksville18 this year are lib. 9–15–8.
 
20. Pd. Squire19 3/9 part of 4/. the price of a cooler.
Recd. of A. Witt for law fund [8/6].
21. Pd. Quash20 1/.
Sep. 26. Pd. at Rutherfords21 for oats 1/.
Recd. of J. Ford for law fund 6/3.
28. Pd. at Mrs. Cooley’s22 for dinner 4/.
Pd. Miles Taylor 1/3.
Pd. James Vaughan23 2/.
Recd. of Alexr. McCaul 5£ Qu. mistake for 10£.
29. Pd. ferriage and servants at Davies’s24 4/.
Oct.  2. Pd. at Coffee house25 1/3.
 4. Gave a taylor 1/3.
 9. Pd. Alexr. Craig26 for wood 6/. for work 3/3.
10. Gave a barber 2/6.
12. Pd. Mr. Smith27 20/.
14. Pd. at coffee house 2/.
 
15. Pd. for oats 30/.
Pd. M. Orr for washing in June 21/.
20. Pd. for blacking 1/3.
Pd. coach hire 1/3.
21. Pd. N. Walthoe for law fund 28/9.
22. Gave a servt. 2/6.
Pd. for chesnuts 1/3.
24. Pd. Craig28 in boot for buckles 10/.
29. Pd. for oranges 2/.
Gave a servt. 1/.
Pd. Rind 12/6.
Nov.  2. Gave a servt. 1/.
 4. Pd. Purdie for newspapers 12/6.
(5. Recd. of Walter Cole for Garret Minor £26–6–3.)29
 6. Pd. for fodder 25/.
Pd. Mr. Carter’s30 gardener for seeds 2/3.
 7. Pd. at Duncastle’s31 for entertt. 10/.
Pd. at Claiborne’s ferry32 5/.
 8. Pd. for entertt. at K. William C. H. 4/7½.
Nov.  9. Pd. ferriage at Richmond 2/6.
(Pd. Garret Minor £26–6–3d).
15. Recd. of T. Morgan33 for corn sold at the mill 5/.
17. Pd. for entertt. at Williams’s 7/3.
Recd. of T. Stockdon for law fund 5/.
( 18.
Recd. of James Gilmer to return works and pay rights and Secretary’s fees for Joseph Dennis 22/6. )
Recd. of J. Madison for law fund 52/6. Nov. 19. Recd. of J. Mills do. 10/.
20. Pd. Hyde at Staunton for lodging 20/.
Pd. a shoemaker in Staunton 2/.
Pd. T. Bowyer for entertt. 2£–5.
 
21. Pd. for entertt. at Williams’s 6/.
( 22.
Inclosed to John May Wmsburgh. Dennis’s certificate and 22/6. )
Ready cash 5/.
Dec.  7. Gave Jupiter to pay ferriages to Wmsburgh. 2/6.
10. Recd. of W. Allegre for law fund 20/.
10. Repd. Will. Lewis34 money I recd. of him to purchase a book of arithmetic for one Davies 5/.
Pd. Will. Lewis for venison 2/6.
20. Gave T. Morgan order on R. Harvie35 for 20/.
24. Minor’s sawyers left off work. They have sawed (as they say) 2500 pales, 220 rails, 650 f. of inch chesnut plank, and 520 of 2¼ inch do.

1Except as noted, TJ marked out all legal entries in the 1767-1770 memorandum books. The marks are evidently connected with his posting of MB entries into ancillary records such as the Case Book description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends and Fee Book description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Fee Book,” 1767-1774, containing entries pertaining to his law practice. Indexed. Miscellaneous accounts, 1764-1794. 187 bound quarto leaves. CSmH description ends . As both the Case Book and Fee Book were transcribed or compiled from earlier records, it is impossible to date these posting marks or to determine whether the postings were made into the surviving Case and Fee Books or their unlocated predecessors. Until 1 June 1769 TJ used a large X or occasionally a single oblique line to mark out entries posted to either or both of his records. From 1 June 1769 to 1 June 1770 he made an oblique line (\) through entries posted to these records. After 1 June 1770 he used this line only on entries posted to the Case Book, or its predecessor. He made an oblique line (/) through entries posted to the Fee Book. Entries posted to both records, therefore, are marked out with a large X. TJ continued the use of this last method of marking out until 1774, when he ceased practicing law.

Throughout this period TJ rather consistently marked out entries which did not require posting to another record with a single vertical line. Entries marked out with spiral lines or repeated oblique lines have been treated as deletions.

2Date is from Case Book, No. 36, “Pharr’s case.” description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends TJ received his first case, an action for land, from Gabriel Jones of Augusta County on 12 Feb. 1767. For an excellent examination of TJ’s career as an attorney, see Dewey, Jefferson Lawyer. Dewey proves that TJ practiced only before the General Court, never in the county courts, and he demonstrates that the majority of TJ’s cases concerned the acquisition of title to land. See also Edward Dumbauld, Thomas Jefferson and the Law (Norman, Okla., 1978), which treats TJ’s legal career in chapters four and five.

3MS torn; two or more lines missing at head of page.

4MS torn; most of a line missing.

5MS torn; undetermined number of words missing.

6MS torn; possibly a line missing.

7MS torn; two or more lines missing.

8The plaintiff is identified from Case Book, No. 37 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends .

9 Edmund Pendleton (1721-1803). It was common in General Court practice for each litigant to employ two attorneys, unless the action was merely routine.

10MS torn; two or three words missing.

11The parties in the suit were from Amherst and Augusta counties (Case Book, Nos. 33 and 34 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends ).

12The “entry” was one of many steps in the procedure for acquiring and preserving title to land in eighteenth-century Virginia. To acquire a parcel of Crown land over 400 acres, a prospective purchaser began by petitioning the Governor’s Council. He received an order of Council for the land and, for each fifty acres, a certificate called a “right,” which cost five shillings sterling. He then presented the order of Council and rights to the county surveyor, who recorded this “entry” and proceeded to survey the land. Within three months of the survey the purchaser was required to take the plat, the order of Council, and the rights, along with the requisite fees, to the Secretary’s Office; this process was called “returning the works.” He then received a patent. For parcels under 400 acres the order of Council was not necessary and rights were obtained directly from the Receiver General (Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1469-71 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ; TJ to William Wood, 17 July 1772).

Three years from the date of the patent, land became delinquent if no quitrents had been paid or if the requirements for improving the property had not been met. Since delinquent or “lapsed” land reverted to the Crown, anyone who knew of and wished to acquire such land could enter a “petition” for it before the General Court. If he successfully proved delinquency he received a certificate entitling him to a patent for the land. Petitions for lapsed land were heard on the seventh day of the sessions of the General Court. For the laws in effect at this time regarding such petitions and requirements for seating and planting property bought from the Crown, see Hening, Statutes, vi, 418-21, 424-6 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends .

To avoid patent fees, the payment of quitrents, or the seating and planting requirements, many landholders did not pursue the patenting procedure beyond the survey; in other words, they did not return the works. Since such surveyed but unpatented land was also subject to forfeiture, a claimant could enter a “caveat” before the Governor’s Council. If successful, he received an order of Council for the land. Caveats were heard by the Council in the middle of June.

Most of TJ’s petition and caveat cases were of the adversary type, brought by Augusta County land speculators and others who hoped to acquire land at well below market price by paying only for rights and fees. He also took a number of cases which were so-called “friendly” petitions or caveats. From the time of the entry of a petition or caveat until its success or dismissal, no other such action regarding the land in question could be filed. Landholders, therefore, could have friends enter petitions or caveats to protect their lapsed or surveyed but unpatented lands from other claimants. This was a widespread method of avoiding the payment of quitrents. The friendly petition was also used to perfect title to property, as in Smith v. Patterson (MB 22 Mch. 1770, legal notations; Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1448-51 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ).

13The use of ad sectam (ads.) in citing a case indicates that the defendant’s name appears first in the citation.

14The sheriff collected the public, county, and usually the parish levies; however, as in this case when a sheriff was a defendant, a coroner served the process (Hening, Statutes, vi, 330 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ). Tobacco was the currency in which most dues and levies were paid until the end of the colonial period, when the practice began to disappear.

15This was a reimbursement for writ fees and other advancements; TJ normally collected his attorney’s fee upon completion of each case. Legal fees for practice before the General Court were fixed by statute at £5 for chancery cases and £2–10 for all other causes (Hening, Statutes, vii, 400 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ; viii, 198, 385-6). In May 1773 TJ and other General Court attorneys publicly announced that they would henceforth ask for half the lawyer’s fee in advance (Papers, i, 98-9 description begins Julian P. Boyd and others, eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, N.J., 1950- description ends ).

16A bail piece is a bail bond. In colonial Virginia there were two types of bail. The first was used to secure the defendant’s appearance. The second type, known as “special bail,” was used to secure the defendant’s payment of a judgment if the case was decided against him (St. George Tucker, Blackstone’s Commentaries: with Notes of Reference, to the Constitution and Laws, of the Federal Government of the United States; and of the Commonwealth of Virginia [Philadelphia, 1803], iv, 43, note C, “Arrest and Bail”).

17TJ’s first cousins George and John Jefferson were sons of his uncle, Field Jefferson (1702-1765).

18TJ refers here to the judicial function of the Governor’s Council, exercised as the General Court (“G. C.,” “Gen. Ct.”), which acted both as an appellate court and a trial court. The Governor’s Council was composed of the governor and not more than twelve members, named to their posts by the Crown, and possessed executive, legislative, and judicial powers. As the General Court, the Council met in Williamsburg for sessions of twenty-four days, beginning on 10 Apr. and 10 Oct. The first five days were given over to chancery cases and appeals from the inferior courts. The Council also sat as a court of oyer and terminer for one or two days in June and December to hear criminal cases involving individuals other than slaves.

For the operation of the General Court during TJ’s legal career, see Hening, Statutes, vi, 325-50 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ; Mays, Pendleton, i, 235-8 description begins Daniel J. Mays, Edmund Pendleton, 1721-1803, Cambridge, Mass., 1952, 2 vols. description ends ; Alan M. Smith, “Virginia Lawyers, 1680-1776: The Birth of an American Profession,” Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1967; and Hugh F. Rankin, “The General Court of Colonial Virginia: Its Jurisdiction and Personnel,” VMHB, lxx (1962), 142-53.

19This action on debt was brought by the former governor against Richard Lee (c. 1726-1795) of Westmoreland County. The attorney general was John Randolph (c. 1727-1784). See Case Book, No. 43 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends .

20This friendly caveat protected the Bedford County lands inherited from PJ while TJ was completing the process of obtaining patents. On 17 and 20 Sep. 1768 patents were granted for the following tracts (LPB, xxxvii, 443-5 description begins Land Patent Books. Vi description ends ):

a. 298 acres on Tomahawk and Rock Castle creeks in present Campbell County, which TJ sold in 1776 (AlCSurB, I, pt. 1, 177 description begins Albemarle County Surveyor’s Books, Albemarle County Courthouse, Charlottesville, Va. description ends ; MB 29 May 1777).

b. 2,000 acres called “The Rough” on Cheese and Judith’s creeks in Bedford County, sold in 1775 (AlCSurB, i, pt. 1, 181 description begins Albemarle County Surveyor’s Books, Albemarle County Courthouse, Charlottesville, Va. description ends ; MB 3 Apr. 1777).

c. 560 acres on Tuckahoe Creek in Bedford County, sold in 1771 (AlCSurB, i, pt. 1, 231 description begins Albemarle County Surveyor’s Books, Albemarle County Courthouse, Charlottesville, Va. description ends ; MB 17 Sep. 1771, cash accounts).

21 Nathaniel Walthoe (d. 1770) was clerk of the Council from 1743 until his death; he was succeeded by John Blair (1732-1800).

22TJ’s friend Alexander McCaul was a partner in the Glasgow mercantile firm Kippen & Co., later Henderson, McCaul & Co. In the pre-Revolutionary period it was with this firm that TJ, as PJ before him, transacted the major part of his business. He sold them his tobacco, received cash or goods from their stores, and by the Revolution had accumulated a debt to them of £1,400. Other than the occasional sums received from Kippen & Co. factor Neill Campbell, MB entries shed little light on TJ’s dealings with his chosen British mercantile connection; they were no doubt recorded in now unlocated private accounts kept by that firm (“Notes on the account of R. Harvie & Co. against me,” 22 July 1795, MHi; MB 1 Aug. 1789, 4 Mch. 1790).

23TJ presumably intended “put his hand on.”

24TJ evidently intended “she was with child.”

25In 1767 the quitrent was one shilling sterling per fifty acres, payable yearly to the sheriff for benefit of the Crown. Nonpayment for three years caused property to become “lapsed” and thus unprotected against petitions entered by individuals other than the patentholder. The practice of paying quitrents was abolished in May 1779. See Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1448-51 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ; and Beverley W. Bond, Jr., The Quit-Rent System in the American Colonies (New Haven, 1919), p. 219-53.

26A deposition de bene esse is testimony taken if the witness might be unavailable at the time of the trial.

27 John May (1744-1790) worked in the Secretary’s Office and acted as TJ’s “agent” there until 1769, when he was appointed first clerk of Botetourt County. In 1778 he became clerk of the General Court in Williamsburg.

28The Secretary’s Office, one of the colony’s oldest administrative institutions, was located in the Public Records Office in Williamsburg. The secretary, usually a member of Council, was keeper of the seal of the colony and issued all patents and other papers bearing the governor’s signature. Almost all administrative records of the colony, such as the governor’s proclamations, vital statistics, proceedings of the Admiralty and General Courts, lists of tithables, royal charters, and official correspondence with the home government, were kept in his office.

The office also served as the colony’s land office. All deeds, rolls of escheated lands, papers relating to coroner’s inquests, and certificates of fines certified by the secretary were kept here. Among the writs issued were those from the General Court, those used in selecting members of the House of Burgesses, and those determining land rights. On the functions of the office see P. S. Flippen, The Royal Government in Virginia (New York, 1919), p. 223-39; Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1461-5 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ; and Junius R. Fishburne, Jr., “The Office of Secretary of State in Colonial Virginia,” Ph.D. diss., Tulane University, 1971.

Thomas Nelson (1716-1782) held the office of secretary from 1743 to 1776.

29 William Allegre was a resident of Albemarle County and later of the Richmond area. He gave Martha Wayles Skelton lessons on the spinet for two years before her marriage to TJ (Fee Book: John Wayles account description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Fee Book,” 1767-1774, containing entries pertaining to his law practice. Indexed. Miscellaneous accounts, 1764-1794. 187 bound quarto leaves. CSmH description ends ).

30TJ erroneously entered this and the following payment, part of the cash accounts, in the legal notations.

31Thus in MS.

32At the end of 1767, when the legal and cash account entries for that year were complete, thirty-three blank pages remained between the two sections of the 1767 notebook. TJ later filled these blank pages with miscellaneous memoranda, beginning with this entry of 14 July 1768 and ending with the entries on the digging of the cellar and dry well in the first months of 1771. In this three-year period TJ called the 1767 volume his “common” memorandum book (see MB 20 Nov. 1768, legal notations). With the exception of architectural and literary memoranda and certain other entries as noted, TJ marked out all the entries in this section, usually with horizontal lines through the entire entry. These and the marginal Xs are probably in some way connected with his accomplishment of the actions prompted by the entries. TJ’s rather random dating has been supplemented where possible by bracketed dates, supplied from internal evidence or other sources as noted.

33At the invitation of several early-blooming patriots, William Rind came to Williamsburg in 1766 to establish his Virginia Gazette description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends , which would be independent of the governor’s influence. It was for many years the rival of the Virginia Gazette published by John Dixon and Alexander Purdie description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends . TJ assisted Rind by obtaining upcountry subscriptions.

34 The Gentleman’s Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, of which TJ owned volumes for the years 1756, 1767, and 1768, was founded in London in 1731 (Sowerby, No. 4895 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

35This subscription is possibly for a bridge over the Rivanna River near Charlottesville. Its construction was authorized in 1762, but no bridge was built until the beginning of the next century (Hening, Statutes, vii, 622-3 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ; Woods, Albemarle, p. 72 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

36 Anna Scott Jefferson (1755-1828), TJ’s youngest sister and the twin of Randolph, was known in the family as Nancy.

37Attached. A two-line entry following this is faded and illegible.

38 Peyton Randolph.

39 Carter Henry Harrison (c. 1727-c. 1794) of Clifton in Cumberland County was the son of Benjamin Harrison of Berkeley and brother of Benjamin Harrison, the signer of the Declaration of Independence. He married TJ’s aunt Susannah Randolph. TJ probably saw Harrison on 25 Sep. 1768 on his way to Williamsburg (see MB 25 Sep. 1768, legal notations).

40Date from 1768 cash accounts. TJ visited Thomas Mann Randolph at Tuckahoe on 26 Sep. and bought the books on 29 Sep. Mary (Polly) Randolph (1762-1828), Randolph’s oldest child, later married David Meade Randolph and wrote a popular cookbook, The Virginia Housewife (Jonathan Daniels, The Randolphs of Virginia [Garden City, N.Y., 1972], p. 196-8, 228, 247-9; Norfleet, Saint-Mémin, p. 202 description begins Fillmore Norfleet, Saint-Mémin in Virginia: Portraits and Biographies, Richmond, Va., 1942 description ends ).

41The CDs here and the marginal letters below, which were all written in after the original entries, defy certain interpretation. They may signify the status of the cases on the court dockets, although evidence for this explanation is full of inconsistencies. CD may indicate cases ready for trial before the General Court, on the “court docket.” R and RD may indicate those cases not yet ready for trial and subject to the “rules” or on the “rule docket” (for the “rules” setting or postponing the time for the next pleading or procedural move, see Hening, Statutes, vi, 328, 335 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ). The N may indicate a “new cause” not yet on any docket.

42Phrase not marked out.

43TJ regularly used the forms of the Latin pronoun Idem when citing cases with the same parties, abbreviating them id. (Idem) and iid. (Idem, eidem) for the same plaintiff or plaintiffs and eund. (eundem) and eosd. (eosdem) for the same defendant or defendants.

44 The Virginia Almanack, and Ladies Diary, 1769 (Williamsburg, Va., 1768).

45For this date in the Case Book (No. 47) TJ wrote: “Wrote to J. May for Pl. sci. fa.”

46Mesne assignments intervened between the original land grant and the final vesting of interest.

47Phrase not marked out.

48 Michael Bowyer was a deputy sheriff of Augusta County (Virginia Gazette [R], 11 May 1769; Waddell, Augusta County, p. 181 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ).

49This date is from MB 17 Dec. 1768, legal notations, when TJ received John May’s answers to the queries of 18 Nov. 1768.

50 John Harvie (1742-1807), a prominent attorney and political figure in Albemarle County, was the son of one of TJ’s guardians, John Harvie (1706-1767). Harvie lived at this time at Belmont, a few miles northeast of Shadwell. After becoming register of the land office in 1780 he removed permanently to Richmond (Woods, Albemarle, p. 224-5 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

51“And get patent” not marked out.

52This is probably the advertisement which appears over the name of Adam Wallace, who reported a horse “taken up” near Ivy Creek on the Woods’ Gap road (Virginia Gazette [R], 13 Apr. 1769 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ). After taking up and properly reporting and advertising a stray horse, the finder could take possession of the animal after six months, if no owner came forward (Hening, Statutes, vii, 545-8; viii, 354-7 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ).

53 Norborne Berkeley, Baron de Botetourt, was governor of the colony from 1768 to 1770. The petition was possibly that concerning fish traps on the Rivanna River (JHB, 1766-1769, p. 216, 246 description begins Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, 1619-1776, Richmond, 1905-1906, 6 vols. description ends ). The entry is not marked out.

54 Cleveland Coffey advertised a horse “taken up” in Albemarle County (Virginia Gazette [R], 13 Apr. 1769 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ).

55Oznabrig, or osnaburg, was a coarse brownish linen often used for slave clothing.

56Dutch blankets were coarse striped woollen blankets (TJ to Robert Patterson, 13 Oct. 1815).

57Dowlas was a coarse linen fabric used for towels and shirts (Fairchild’s Dictionary of Textiles, p. 198 description begins Isabel B. Wingate, Fairchild’s Dictionary of Textiles, 6th ed., New York, 1979 description ends ).

58 Jupiter (1743-1800), a slave inherited from PJ, was at this time TJ’s body servant and coachman. In later years he worked as a wagoner and stonecutter. His wife was Suck, a Monticello cook. After his death TJ wrote: “With all his defects, he leaves a void in my domestic arrangements which cannot be filled” (AlCWB, ii, 41 description begins Albemarle County Will Books, Albemarle County Courthouse, Charlottesville, Va. description ends ; TJ to MJE, 12 Feb. 1800).

Except as otherwise noted, all information pertaining to TJ’s slaves is from the Farm Book description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Farm Book,” 1774-1826. Reproduced in facsimile in Betts, Farm Book. MHi description ends or the slave files in the Monticello Archives.

59This is the first of several instances in the MB where TJ has recorded verse and maxims, some perhaps of his own composition. They were entered at several different times. It would be difficult to determine the sequence with accuracy, but those which appear to have been written down concurrent with the memoranda of this page are the second, the fourth, and possibly the sixth. Only one of these maxims, now illegible, has been lined out. The first maxim, meaning “Moderation in all respects [is] best,” is ascribed, without the phrase “in all respects,” to Cleobulus in Diogenes Laertius, Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers, i, 93 (Sowerby, Nos. 31-33 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

60No source found.

61“Bear and forbear” is from Epictetus and appears in Aulus Gellius, Attic Nights, xvii, 19, 6 (Sowerby, No. 4905). See also Arrian’s Discourses of Epictetus, iv, 8, 20.

62No source for TJ’s maxim exactly as he wrote it has been found; its meaning, however, “It is good because it is honorable,” found frequent expression. See, for instance, Cicero, De Finibus, ii, 12, 38, and De Officiis, iii, 3, 11 (Sowerby, Nos. 1315, 1317 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

63“Altogether smooth and round in himself” is from the description of the wise man as conceived by the Stoics, in Horace, Sermones, ii, 7, 86.

64“Be honored for your virtue, well done,” is from Horace, Sermones, i, 2, 31.

65A source has not been found for this phrase, which means "[One] must bear and hope."

66“One should not despair at all” is from Horace, Odes, i, 7, 27. The entire quotation is “Nil desperandum Teucro duce et auspice Teucro.”

67“Each one the architect of his own fortune” is attributed to Appius Claudius Caecus in the work ascribed to Sallust, Ad Caesarem Senem de Re Publica, i, 2 (Sowerby, Nos. 55-58 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ). The complete quotation is: “Sed res docuit id verum esse, quod in carminibus Appius ait, fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae.”

68No source found.

69“To say what one thinks” occurs in Horace, Epistles, i, 4, 9 (Sowerby, No. 4478 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

70Alexander Pope used what he called a Socratic maxim in the last line of Epistle i, Essay on Man: “One truth is clear, whatever is, is right” (Sowerby, No. 1403 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

71No source for this maxim, whose meaning is roughly “Glory comes from uprightness,” has been identified.

72A source has not been identified for “No one nowhere.”

73“Yield not to misfortunes, but move more boldly against them” is from Vergil, Aeneid, vi, 95 (Sowerby, Nos. 4279-80 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

74 Charles Lewis (d. 1779), son of Robert Lewis of Belvoir, advertised a horse “taken up” at his farm in the North Garden area of Albemarle County (Virginia Gazette [R], 13 Apr. 1769 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ). See L & B, xviii, 141 description begins Andrew A. Lipscomb and Albert E. Bergh, eds., The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, “Memorial Edition,” Washington, D.C., 1903-1904, 20 vols. description ends , for TJ’s brief description of Lewis.

75 Robert Carter Nicholas (1728-1780).

76 Tucker Woodson (d. 1779) was deputy clerk of Albemarle County (Woods, Albemarle, p. 356-7 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

77 Thomson Mason (1733-1785), younger brother of George Mason of Gunston Hall, also practiced law before the General Court.

78This large reading desk had a slant top capable of holding large folios; the reader stood to use it. For mention of a similar desk see MB 1772, miscellaneous memoranda; see also undated specifications and drawings in MHi. George Donald was a cabinetmaker in Anthony Hay’s Williamsburg shop; he later moved to Richmond.

79For the Association see MB 18 May 1769, cash accounts. The list that follows originally contained only: “paint and oil, black cloth, velvet, linen, cambrick, black silk stockings, bottles, hkcheifs., tea, paper, long lawn, scarlet cloth.” TJ added the figures and other items at later dates.

80Two or three words illegible.

81 George Dudley began work as a brickmaker at Monticello on 14 July 1769 (see MB 16 July 1769, cash accounts).

82This sentence not marked out.

83 Elizabeth Randolph Chiswell (c. 1722-1776) was the widow of Colonel John Chiswell. The entry is not marked out.

84Entry not marked out.

85This date is from MB 5 July 1769, legal notations, when TJ wrote to John May concerning these and the following twenty cases.

86Virginia cloth was a homespun fabric of tow and cotton used mainly for clothing slaves. This and the following nine entries are not marked out.

87Eighteenth-century dimity was a much stouter fabric than modern dimity and was used mainly for upholstery and hangings.

88This may be the slave Peter, son of Myrtilla, bequeathed by PJ to RJ.

89TJ’s friend John Coles ii (1745-1808) lived at Enniscorthy in the Green Mountain area of southern Albemarle County, about sixteen miles southwest of Monticello (Woods, Albemarle, p. 172 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ). For the duties of the overseer, or surveyor, of the roads, see Hening, Statutes, vi, 64-9, vii, 577-80 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends .

90Entry not marked out.

91Two John Walkers appear in MB. One was an Orange County attorney (MB 14 Sep. 1769, cash accounts, 15 Sep. 1795; TJ Index, 1767-1770 description begins Thomas Jefferson manuscript indexes for the Memorandum Books, 1767-1826, bound with them, except for 1773 (unlocated), 1776-1778 and 1779-1782 (ViU) description ends ; TJ to Peter Carr, 8 May 1791). Most MB references are to TJ’s close friend and schoolmate John Walker (1744-1809), oldest son of Dr. Thomas Walker. He and his wife, Elizabeth (Betsey) Moore Walker, lived at Belvoir about six miles northeast of Shadwell. The friends soon began to take different political paths and by 1802 their friendship was irrevocably broken by the public scandal arising from TJ’s alleged improper conduct toward Mrs. Walker from 1768 to 1779 (Woods, Albemarle, p. 335-6 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ; Malone, Jefferson, i, 153-4, 447-51 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends ).

92TJ required attachments as a justice of the peace. He was first appointed a justice of Albemarle County on 6 Nov. 1766 and reappointed in 1768 and 1771. He declined the 1771 reappointment but served again in 1777 (Justices of the Peace of Colonial Virginia, 1757-1775 [Richmond, 1922], p. 68, 89, 106; Malone, Jefferson, i, 130, 287 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends ; on the duties of the office, see George Webb, The Office and Authority of a Justice of Peace [Williamsburg, Va., 1736]). This entry is not marked out.

93Entry not marked out.

94“A franklin”: a lightning rod. The entry is not marked out.

95 Dabney Carr (1743-1773), TJ’s very close friend, had married TJ’s sister Martha on 20 July 1765. They lived at Spring Forest in Goochland County, just off TJ’s route from Shadwell to Williamsburg (see TJ MS Map). This entry is not marked out.

96“Got it” not marked out.

1Last two phrases not marked out. Shadwell burned on 1 Feb. 1770 (see this date in 1770 MB, legal notations).

2Entry not marked out.

3 John Ramsay had been minister of St. Anne’s Parish, Albemarle County, since 1751. TJ, who was not elected to the vestry until 1777, may have been the “Gentleman at the Bar” to whom the parish inhabitants applied in 1767 to help rid them of this unsuitable pastor. The charges brought against Ramsay in the General Court in 1768 included neglect of his ministerial duties, excessive drinking, and the attempted seduction of Joanna Plummer Collins. Soon after TJ made this entry Ramsay died, the case was dropped, and Charles Clay succeeded to the ministry of St. Anne’s Parish (Francis Fauquier to Bishop of London, 27 Apr. 1767, Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1441-2 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ; Meade, Old Churches, ii, 48-50 description begins Bishop Meade, Old Churches, Ministers, and Families of Virginia, Philadelphia, 1857, 2 vols. description ends ; G. MacLaren Brydon, Virginia’s Mother Church [Richmond, 1947], ii, 337-9; St. Anne’s Parish vestry book, 1772-1785, CSmH). Clearmount (later Forge) Church was in southern Albemarle County on the Hardware River about a mile below Carter’s Bridge (Woods, Albemarle, p. 56, 125, 163 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ; Elizabeth C. Langhorne, A History of Christ Church, Glendower [Charlottesville, Va., 1957], p. 33-7).

4 Thomas Carr (1735-1807), half-brother of Dabney Carr, lived several miles north of Charlottesville (Edson I. Carr, The Carr Family Records [Rockton, Ill., 1894], p. 73; Woods, Albemarle, p. 159 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

5Last sentence not marked out.

6Entry not marked out.

7 Nicholas Lewis (1734-1808), TJ’s close friend and neighbor, lived at The Farm on the eastern edge of Charlottesville. While TJ was in France, Lewis supervised his affairs in Albemarle County (see Lewis’ accounts in Ledger, 1767-1770 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s manuscript ledger, 1767-1770, containing entries for daily expenditures and receipts. Miscellaneous accounts, 1783-1797, including accounts with Nicholas Lewis, 1786-1791, and nailery accounts, 1794-1797. 140 bound quarto leaves. ViU description ends ). Lewis was involved in public affairs and served as surveyor and sheriff of the county. He married Mary Walker, daughter of Dr. Thomas Walker (Woods, Albemarle, p. 252 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

8The architectural section of the 1767 MB, which begins on the verso of the page ending with the preceding entry, contains five pages of memoranda followed by two blank pages. It is difficult to determine exactly when TJ made these memoranda, and the chronology is further complicated by additions and emendations he made over an extended period. The earliest entries must date between 1767, when TJ first began using the 1767 notebook, and 2 Oct. 1769, when the miscellaneous memoranda resume. MB entries for May 1768 indicate that TJ had by then determined to build at Monticello and by Feb. 1769 he had resolved on a plan for a dwelling, although it was evidently smaller than the one to which these notes pertain (MB 7 and 15 May 1768, cash accounts; TJ to Thomas Turpin, 5 Feb. 1769). The dimensions and brick calculations in these memoranda correspond to a plan (Nichols, No. 40) for a house which was to have a two-story central block and flanking wings, each eighteen feet square with an attic above. This preliminary plan was later modified by the addition of octagonal projections to the wings and central block, as in Nichols, No. 49, which, with the elevations in Nichols, Nos. 47 and 48, was the basis for the construction of the first Monticello house, believed to have been begun in 1770.

The architectural memoranda are particularly important not only for the information about the design and construction of the house but also for the insight they provide into TJ’s approach to solving formal architectural problems and his reliance on two important books, James Gibbs, Rules for Drawing the Several Parts of Architecture (Sowerby, No. 4184 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ) and the Leoni edition of either 1715 or 1742 of The Architecture of A. Palladio (Sowerby, Nos. 4174, 4175 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ), for the detailing of architectural elements. The Marquis de Chastellux, visiting TJ in 1782, remarked that this early house “resembles none of the others seen in this country” and added that “Mr. Jefferson is the first American who has consulted the Fine Arts to know how he should shelter himself from the weather” (Chastellux, Travels, ii, 391 description begins Travels in North America in the Years 1780, 1781, and 1782 by the Marquis de Chastellux, ed. Howard C. Rice, Jr., Chapel Hill, N.C., 1963, 2 vols. description ends ).

9Wainscot.

10Both place and stock bricks were made at Monticello. Stock bricks, the finer of the two types, were used for the outside face of walls. The additional rubbing would produce sharper edges and a more uniform appearance. There is no evidence of the use of rubbed brick at Monticello.

11“Zocco”: socle. TJ’s spelling corresponds to the form used in the Leoni editions of Andrea Palladio’s Four Books of Architecture (Sowerby, Nos. 4174, 4175 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

12TJ’s original plan was to execute the moldings of the house in stone, and it was probably in the fall of 1769 that he asked James Ogilvie, then sailing for England, to obtain estimates on the cost of stonework from British masons. These estimates (MHi) indicate that TJ considered continuing the moldings of the column capital around the walls of the house. This was contrary to approved classical treatment and was never carried out (Ogilvie to TJ, 26 Apr. 1771).

13“O.H.”: outhouses. TJ refers to the north and south pavilions, each twenty feet square. They were later incorporated in the two L-shaped office wings attached to the main house (Nichols, No. 34).

14TJ was citing either the 1715 or 1742 Leoni edition of The Architecture of A. Palladio; in Four Books (Sowerby, Nos. 4174, 4175 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

15This may be John Saunders, a Williamsburg carpenter. In 1761 he built the stables for the president of the College of William and Mary, and he later was awarded the contract to build the additions to the college based on TJ’s plans. He died in 1792 or 1793 (Marcus Whiffen, The Public Buildings of Williamsburg [Williamsburg, Va., 1958], p. 182, 220).

16These specifications for the wings of the main house and the pavilions indicate that there were to be three windows with full exterior entablatures for each wing and two windows with simple architrave surrounds for each pavilion.

17Thus in MS.

18TJ was attempting to solve the problem of water seeping into the house at the meeting of the upper and lower window sashes. He must have realized that joining the sashes with a rabbet would restrict their movement and on the next line he attempted to solve the problem in another way.

19 Neill Campbell, factor for Kippen & Co., managed their store in Richmond. He had managed their store in southern Albemarle County until the end of 1768 (Virginia Gazette [P & D], 1 Dec. 1768 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ).

20TJ often visited his friend John Page at Rosewell in Gloucester County. Known for some of the finest brickwork in the colonies, this house burned early in this century and only portions of its walls remain (Waterman, Mansions of Virginia, p. 111-23 description begins Thomas Tileston Waterman, The Mansions of Virginia, 1706-1776, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1946 description ends ).

21These brick estimates probably antedate the beginning of brick production in July 1769 because they specify a larger brick than any actually used at Monticello (MB 16 July 1769, cash accounts).

22TJ evidently planned to paint his dining room in distemper, a technique in which the colors are mixed with size and water and applied warm to the walls. The size can be made from boiled leather cuttings.

23The lead manufactory of Joseph Kidd and Joshua Kendall was at this time in the Bruton Parish Church block in Williamsburg.

24The only record of TJ’s intended use of an Aeolian harp is in connection with a garden temple (MB 1771, miscellaneous memoranda).

25TJ used the term “Venetian blinds” to refer to louvered blinds, whether mounted like shutters or of the hanging type which could be raised by cords. Here he was probably ordering the latter, as he later mentions pulleys and cords (MB 1767, miscellaneous memoranda, 2 Oct. 1769).

26Scotch carpet, an ingrain carpet made in both floral and geometric patterns, was first produced in Kidderminster, England, and later in Scotland (Fairchild’s Dictionary of Textiles, p. 308 description begins Isabel B. Wingate, Fairchild’s Dictionary of Textiles, 6th ed., New York, 1979 description ends ). TJ commissioned James Ogilvie to purchase him a Scotch carpet in the fall of 1769 (MB 1767, miscellaneous memoranda, 2 Oct. 1769).

27 James Gibbs, Rules for Drawing the Several Parts of Architecture (London, 1738; Sowerby, No. 4184 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ). There is no evidence that TJ executed ceiling designs in papier-mâché.

28The basement of the south pavilion served as the Monticello kitchen until the end of the century. The exact dimensions recorded here indicate that the foundation walls were at least partially constructed at the time of this entry, probably the summer of 1770. Bricks for this building were probably not laid earlier than May 1770, at which time TJ began to quarry and burn lime for mortar, and the structure was completed by Nov. 1770, when TJ moved into it (Misc. Accts.: Will Beck account description begins Thomas Jefferson manuscript miscellaneous business and personal accounts, 1764-1779. CSmH description ends ; MB 26 Nov. 1770, cash accounts). The south pavilion was built into the hillside, hence the references to an upper and lower level and an upper fall. The page containing this single entry is followed by two blank pages.

29The letters refer to Lisbon wine, Madeira, rum, and cider. If TJ kept a cellar book, it is not known to have survived.

30 James Ogilvie, a native of Scotland, was about to leave for England to seek ordination as an Episcopal clergyman. He returned to Virginia after his ordination in 1771 and in 1776 was serving as rector of Westover Parish, Charles City County (Historical Magazine of the Protestant Episcopal Church, i [1932], 32-6). On 28 Mch. 1770 Ogilvie wrote TJ: “I have purchased a few of your Commissions, the others I delayed till the measures of Parliament were known” (see also MB 22 Oct. 1769, cash accounts; TJ to Ogilvie, 20 Feb. 1771; and Ogilvie to TJ, 26 Apr. 1771, at which time Ogilvie had not yet sent any of the articles).

TJ marked out only two entries in this list–the pulleys and the canvas. The hinges, pulleys, and mortise locks were procured from Secretary Thomas Nelson (MB 5 Nov. 1770, cash accounts; Nelson to TJ, 6 Mch. 1770).

31Except for the duty on tea, the Townshend Acts were repealed on 12 Apr. 1770.

32A calender is a machine in which cloth or paper is pressed under rollers to smooth or glaze the surface.

33The date is from cash accounts, which indicate several visits to Rosewell or its vicinity in this month. Frances Burwell, daughter of Robert Carter Burwell of Isle of Wight County, married John Page about 1765. This entry is not marked out.

34“Skyow”: scow? The entry is not marked out.

35See Malone, Jefferson, i, 115-16 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends , and Papers, i, 87-8 description begins Julian P. Boyd and others, eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, N.J., 1950- description ends , for TJ’s first involvement in public service. As early as 1763 TJ had become interested in the possibility of making the Rivanna River navigable. He initiated and led the effort to clear the river, which was opened to boat traffic from its mouth to the falls at Milton in the 1770s.

36 Thomas Mann Randolph (1741-1793) of Tuckahoe in Goochland County was TJ’s friend from childhood and the father of Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. (1768-1828), TJ’s future son-in-law.

37The governor received £1–1–6, Virginia currency, for every patent he signed (see Reese, Fauquier Papers, iii, 1460-1 description begins The Official Papers of Francis Fauquier, ed. George Reese, Charlottesville, Va., 1980-1983, 3 vols. description ends ).

38 James Steptoe (1750-1826) succeeded John May as TJ’s “agent” at the Secretary’s Office, where he worked until he was appointed clerk of Bedford County in 1772 (MB 10 May 1771, cash accounts; TJ to ——, 30 June 1771).

39This entry was probably made not long before 6 Mch. 1770, the date Beck was ready to return from Williamsburg and Yorktown with nectarine grafts from George Wythe and mortise locks from Secretary Thomas Nelson, among other things (see Wythe to TJ, 9 Mch. 1770; and Nelson to TJ, 6 Mch. 1770).

40 William Beck worked for TJ as a limeburner, well-digger, and messenger from 1768 until the early 1800s (see his accounts with TJ in the Misc. Accts. description begins Thomas Jefferson manuscript miscellaneous business and personal accounts, 1764-1779. CSmH description ends and Fee Book description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Fee Book,” 1767-1774, containing entries pertaining to his law practice. Indexed. Miscellaneous accounts, 1764-1794. 187 bound quarto leaves. CSmH description ends ).

41“Pomegranate” through “artichokes” not marked out.

42This phrase not marked out.

43 Alexander Purdie was printer and coeditor with John Dixon of the Virginia Gazette description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends , rival of William Rind’s Virginia Gazette description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends . Their printing office, which included a bookshop and bookbindery, was on Duke of Gloucester Street in Williamsburg on the site of the present Printing Office.

44“What . . . cost” not marked out.

45 The Acts of Assembly, Now in Force, in the Colony of Virginia (Williamsburg, Va., 1769; Sowerby, No. 1840 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

46“Electrical points”: probably points for lightning rods.

47Gum mastic, a resin from the mastic tree, Pistacia lentiscus, is used as an astringent, aromatic, and varnish ingredient.

48At MB 31 July 1769, cash accounts, TJ called his mountaintop estate “Moncello.” When he called it Hermitage in the present entry, he may have been influenced by his reading of the English poets of landscape, particularly William Shenstone, whose works he had acquired in 1765 (see Marie Kimball, Jefferson: The Road to Glory [New York, 1943], p. 148-9, 321). It is not known when TJ crossed out “Hermitage” and substituted “Monticello,” adding “lop cherry trees” at the same time, but he seems thereafter to have been consistent in calling his property Monticello, an Italian word for Little, Low, or Small Mountain. He used the Italian form of pronunciation: Montichel’lo (see Papers, v, 431-2 description begins Julian P. Boyd and others, eds., The Papers of Thomas Jefferson, Princeton, N.J., 1950- description ends ; see Douglas L. Wilson, “Thomas Jefferson’s Early Notebooks,” WMQ, 3d ser., xlii [Oct. 1985], 436-8, for a persuasive argument that TJ’s references to “Monticello” in the Garden Book for 1767 and 1769 were made retroactively).

TJ had inherited the 1,000 acres which became Monticello from his father, who had patented the land in 1735 (LPB, xvi, 60-2).

49There are no entries in the Garden Book for 1770, and this is the only entry relating to gardening at Monticello for that year. The entry is not marked out.

50About 1757 PJ had built a toll mill on the north bank of the Rivanna River at Shadwell, four miles below Charlottesville. The flood of 1771 destroyed the mill and dam (MB 27 May 1771, cash accounts). In 1777 TJ began extending the canal as contemplated in this entry, moving the intake upriver to a ledge of rocks just below the mouth of Shadwell Branch. Contrary to his expectations, this ledge did not render a dam unnecessary. A new dam and canal, which was over 1,200 yards long, were not completed until 1806 (see Betts, Farm Book, p. 341-4, 363-5 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s Farm Book, ed. Edwin M. Betts, Princeton, N.J., 1953 description ends ). The entry is not marked out.

51Entry not marked out.

52 John Bolling (1737-1800) had married TJ’s sister Mary in 1760. They lived in Goochland County at Fairfields, which was on the James River and Lickinghole Creek about three miles west of Goochland Courthouse (TJ MS Map). In 1785 the Bollings moved to Chestnut Grove in Chesterfield County.

53This is the date Rachael Morrison gave TJ a new case and a first payment (see Case Book, No. 394 description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Case Book, 1767-1774,” 192 bound quarto leaves containing records of 939 cases. Indexed. CSmH description ends ). The entries between this and the next dated one (28 July) appear to have been made both before and during TJ’s trips to Williamsburg of 4 Apr. to 8 May and 5 to 30 June 1770.

54 John Blair (1687-1771), Auditor of the colony from 1732 until his death.

55This action was probably part of the controversy over proposed alternatives for a road from Charlottesville to the east (see MB 1772, miscellaneous memoranda, note 44). John Moore’s ford, located just east of Charlottesville near where present State Route 250 crosses the Rivanna River, was soon cleared despite the opposition (Woods, Albemarle, p. 20 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ; MB 30 Sep. 1771, cash accounts).

56 John Blair (1732-1800), the jurist, was burgess for the College of William and Mary and in the fall of 1770 became clerk of the Council.

57Entry not marked out.

58 Thomas Everard was clerk of the committee of the courts of justice and a permanent assistant clerk in the Secretary’s Office. He was clerk of York County from 1745 to 1784 and mayor of Williamsburg in 1766 and 1771.

59John Bolling?

60Entry not marked out.

61Transfer tobacco was delivered at the warehouse not in casks. Tobacco delivered in properly sealed hogsheads was called crop tobacco.

62TJ is probably referring to tobacco revenues collected by the county. The books were no doubt for the Albemarle County Court, which had been moved from Scottsville to Charlottesville in 1762. Unfortunately there is no evidence of these purchases in the county records.

63This entry concerns the 200,000 acres of bounty lands in the Ohio Valley granted by Governor Dinwiddie’s Proclamation of 1754 to encourage enlistment. George Washington had run an advertisement asking all soldiers who had entered the Virginia Regiment before the battle of Great Meadows in July 1754 to present their claims to him by 10 Oct. 1770 (Virginia Gazette [R], 21 Dec. 1769 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ). This entry is not marked out.

64Entry not marked out.

65Phrase not marked out.

66Two Lewis Burwells appear in MB. This is probably TJ’s college friend, Lewis Burwell (1747-1779) of Fairfield in Gloucester County. Another Lewis Burwell (1716-1784) lived at Kingsmill in James City County.

67 Peter Pelham (1721-1805) was clerk to Governor Botetourt and committee clerk of the House of Burgesses, as well as the pre-eminent musician in Virginia during this period. Born in London and raised in Boston, Pelham about 1754 had settled in Williamsburg, where he taught and performed music and was organist at Bruton Parish Church. TJ enjoyed Pelham’s playing and heard him frequently (Parke Rouse, Jr., “ ‘The Modern Orpheus,’ Peter Pelham,” Arts in Virginia, xviii, No. 2 [Winter 1978], 21-5).

68Last half of entry not marked out.

69TJ wrote to Steptoe concerning these cases on 15 Sep. 1770 (see this date in MB 1770, legal notations).

70This and next two entries not marked out.

71This and the next four entries were probably made during TJ’s 21 to 25 Aug. 1770 visit to Staunton (see those dates in MB 1770, legal notations and cash accounts).

72 Benjamin Waller (1716-1786) was a Williamsburg attorney and clerk of the General Court.

73TJ’s friend Hugh Rose (1743-1795) lived at Geddes in Amherst County.

74Entry not marked out.

75Fincastle County, formed in 1772 from part of Botetourt County, ceased to exist in 1776 when it was divided into Montgomery, Kentucky, and Washington counties (Hening, Statutes, viii, 600-1).

76This sentence and the final phrases of the next three entries are not marked out.

77Entry not marked out.

78Hannah Glasse, The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy, the most popular eighteenth-century English cookbook, was first published in London in 1747.

79“Get” and the last four words of this entry not marked out.

80Entry not marked out.

81Phrase not marked out.

82The cultivation of hemp as a money crop had been officially encouraged in the colony since 1633. The grower in 1770 was entitled to collect from the treasurer a bounty of four shillings for every one hundred pounds of hemp deposited in the public warehouse (Hening, Statutes, viii, 363-4 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ). The entry is not marked out.

83Robert Carter Nicholas.

84Sentence not marked out.

85Entry not marked out.

86Following the death of Lord Botetourt on 15 Oct. 1770, William Nelson (1711-1772) succeeded John Blair as president of the Council and was acting governor of the colony until the arrival of Lord Dunmore in Sep. 1771.

87Entry not marked out.

88This entry was probably made during or shortly after TJ’s December visits at The Forest and certainly before 20 Feb. 1771, by which date he had commissioned the purchase of a German clavichord for Martha Wayles Skelton. In June 1771 he changed his order to a pianoforte, perhaps the one sold to the Baron von Riedesel in 1779 (TJ to Thomas Adams, 20 Feb., 1 June 1771; MB 29 Apr. 1779; Cripe, Jefferson and Music, p. 43, 65-6 description begins Helen C. Cripe, Thomas Jefferson and Music, Charlottesville, Va., 1974 description ends ). The entry is not marked out.

89This cellar, probably dug in the early months of 1771, could have been for the north wing of the Monticello house.

90Archaeological excavations in 1981 revealed that this dry well, just below the south pavilion, was nineteen feet deep and was filled in soon after its completion.

91The next three pages in the original MS are blank.

92This line and the couplet below are from Alexander Pope’s well-known and often emended poem “To Mrs. M. B. on her Birth-day,” lines 2, 15, and 16. The standard form of this line, which TJ used in his “Thoughts on English Prosody” (L & B, xviii, 417 description begins Andrew A. Lipscomb and Albert E. Bergh, eds., The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, “Memorial Edition,” Washington, D.C., 1903-1904, 20 vols. description ends ), is: “Long Health, long Youth, long Pleasure, and a Friend.” For TJ’s use of it, in the variant form here, to conclude a letter, see TJ to Henry Dearborn, 17 May 1818. He owned one of William Warburton’s editions of Pope’s works (Sowerby, No. 4503 description begins E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington, D.C., 1952-1959, 6 vols. description ends ).

93From Pope’s Imitations of Horace, Book ii, Epistle i, line 150. With line 149 it reads: “Lely on animated Canvas stole / The sleepy Eye, that spoke the melting soul.”

94 Non solum nobis is a standard classical phrase. TJ added sed patriae, making the translation: “Not for ourselves only, but for our country.”

95 Fiat justitia, ruat coelum (“Let justice be done, though the sky fall”) was a fairly common nonclassical maxim. TJ’s use of ruet for ruat makes the literal translation: “Let justice be done, the sky will fall.”

1When passing through what is now Rockbridge County on 23 Aug. 1767, TJ viewed the Natural Bridge, probably for the first time. These notes, which are written on the inside back cover of the 1767 Memorandum Book opposite the first page of cash accounts, were the basis for TJ’s famous description of this “most sublime of Nature’s works” in his Notes on Virginia (p. 24-5) description begins Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, ed. William Peden, Chapel Hill, N.C., 1955 description ends . By 1773 TJ had taken steps to become the owner of the bridge and in 1774 he received a patent for a 157-acre tract which included it (MB 10 June 1773, cash accounts, 15 Sep. 1773, legal notations; LPB, xlii, 657-8). TJ often thought of building there “a little hermitage” where he might spend part of every year (TJ to William Carmichael, 26 Dec. 1786). Although that project was never carried out, he did make at least three more recorded visits to the bridge, in 1815, 1817, and 1821, and possibly while staying at Poplar Forest in 1781. In 1809, a financially disastrous year, TJ tried to sell the tract, and he periodically leased it for saltpeter mining and use as a shot tower. By 1815, however, he had “no idea of selling the land. I view it in some degree as a public trust, and would on no consideration permit the bridge to be injured, defaced or masked from public view” (TJ to William Caruthers, 7 Sep. 1809, 15 Mch. 1815). The Natural Bridge tract was sold in 1833 as part of TJ’s estate.

2Correctly “to have fallen.”

3The first entry on the first extant page of 1767 cash accounts was the 19 Aug. payment to John Madison for club; the 18 Aug. entry, like all the legal receipts in this period, was added after completion of the page. It is quite possible that TJ actually began the 1767 cash accounts with this page. The position of the Natural Bridge description on the inside cover opposite the 23 Aug. entry (the date of his visit) supports this hypothesis. Previous pages, if any, were missing at the time TJ drew up the Ledger 1767-1770, which, if it was not contemporaneous with the 1767-70 accounts, was probably drawn up in 1770 after the loss of TJ’s papers in the Shadwell fire. The TJ index for the 1767-70 period also includes nothing previous to these Aug. 1767 entries.

Using a single oblique line (\) TJ marked out all entries dealing with expenses, probably when posting them in the Ledger. Receipts and general entries are not marked out.

4“Law fund” is the term TJ used in the cash accounts section of the MB to refer to receipts and expenditures connected with his legal practice. All 1767 entries concerning the “law fund” are interlined.

5 John Madison (d. 1783) was the long-time clerk of Augusta County. See Malone, Jefferson, i, 118-19 description begins Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time, Boston, 1948-1981, 6 vols. description ends , for the family story of TJ’s introduction to Staunton under Madison’s wing. He was the father of Bishop James Madison and the John Madison, Jr., who frequently appears in the MB.

6The club was the share of joint expenses, divided equally (OED).

7 Thomas Bowyer (d. 1785) kept a Staunton ordinary on the courthouse lot. He moved to Botetourt County in 1771.

8This may be the tavern of either Captain John Paxton (1743-1787) or Captain William Paxton (1733-1795), both of whom lived near present Glasgow in southern Rockbridge County (W. M. Paxton, The Paxtons [Platte City, Mo., 1903], p. 46-7, 248-51; Chastellux, Travels, ii, 404-7 description begins Travels in North America in the Years 1780, 1781, and 1782 by the Marquis de Chastellux, ed. Howard C. Rice, Jr., Chapel Hill, N.C., 1963, 2 vols. description ends ). “Entertainment” is an eighteenth-century British word for services provided by an innkeeper, especially provisions of the table (OED description begins A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles, ed. Sir James Murray and others, Oxford, 1888-1933 description ends ). TJ used it to mean food or lodging or both. The payment to a guide indicates that this was probably the date TJ visited the Natural Bridge.

TJ’s travels in Virginia can be followed in Colles, Roads, Böÿe, Map of Virginia description begins Christopher Colles, A Survey of the Roads of the United States of America, 1789, ed. Walter W. Ristow, Cambridge, Mass., 1961 description ends , and the TJ MS Map.

9 Francis Thorpe kept the Long Ordinary in New London, then the Bedford County seat (Virginia Gazette [R], 14 Apr. 1768 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ). Besides his legal business TJ probably here concerned himself with the Bedford County lands inherited from his father (see MB 20 Oct. 1767, legal notations).

10 Lynch’s ferry, established in 1757, and its tavern, located at the foot of present Ninth Street, Lynchburg, became the focal point for the development of what is now the city of Lynchburg (Chambers, Lynchburg, p. 6-9 description begins S. Allen Chambers, Jr., Lynchburg: An Architectural History, Charlottesville, Va., 1981 description ends ).

11 Gabriel Penn (1741-1798) kept an ordinary in Amherst County.

12 Henry Key’s ordinary was at Findlay’s Gap near the Amherst County courthouse, which was located until 1807 at what is now Colleen in Nelson County (Virginia Gazette [P & D], 17 Oct. 1771 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ).

13 Joseph Berry operated an ordinary and a ferry on the Shenandoah River on the road from Winchester to Ashby’s Gap (“Berry’s Ferry, and Old Roads Leading to That Ferry,” Proceedings of the Clarke County Historical Association, vi [1946], 11-12).

14Now Warrenton.

15 Nicholas Meriwether (1736-1772) was married to Margaret Douglas, daughter of TJ’s preceptor William Douglas. They lived at Clover Fields, about five miles from Shadwell and just north of present Keswick (Woods, Albemarle, p. 272 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ; Rawlings, Ante-bellum Albemarle, p. 76 description begins Mary Rawlings, Ante-bellum Albemarle: Albemarle County, Virginia, Charlottesville, Va., 1935 description ends ).

16 Carrol was probably clearing this land at Monticello for cultivation.

17 Benjamin Colvard (d. 1786) was a Charlottesville tailor (AlCWB, iii, 11 description begins Albemarle County Will Books, Albemarle County Courthouse, Charlottesville, Va. description ends ).

18Albemarle County was divided into two parishes, Fredericksville to the north and St. Anne’s to the south, by a line up the Rivanna River to Secretary’s ford at the base of Monticello mountain and thence west along the Three Notched Road to Woods’ (now Jarman’s) Gap in the Blue Ridge Mountains (Hening, Statutes, vii, 141-2 description begins William Waller Hening, The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, Richmond, 1809-1823, 13 vols. description ends ). Shadwell was in Fredericksville Parish and Monticello was in St. Anne’s. The best account of the Three Notched Road from Richmond via Charlottesville to Augusta County is Nathaniel Mason Pawlett and Howard Newlon, Jr., The Route of the Three Notch’d Road: A Preliminary Report (Charlottesville, Va., 1976), in the Historic Roads of Virginia series published by the Virginia Highway and Transportation Research Council.

19 Squire (1727-1810), a farm laborer at Shadwell, was a former PJ slave leased by TJ from his mother, after whose death he became TJ’s property (Fee Book: Jane Jefferson account description begins Thomas Jefferson’s “Fee Book,” 1767-1774, containing entries pertaining to his law practice. Indexed. Miscellaneous accounts, 1764-1794. 187 bound quarto leaves. CSmH description ends ).

20A farm laborer inherited from PJ, Quash and his wife Nell lived at Monticello.

21 William Rutherford’s Goochland County ordinary was on the Three Notched Road near present Gum Spring (TJ MS Map; GoCCOB, 1767-1771, p. 132 description begins Goochland County Court Order Books, Goochland County Courthouse, Goochland, Va. description ends ).

22The Richmond tavern owned by Abraham Cowley and kept at this time by Mary Cowley was located near the courthouse on the southwest corner of present Main and Twenty-Third streets (Virginia Gazette [P & D], 22 Nov. 1770 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ; Ward and Greer, Richmond During Revolution, p. 5, 51 description begins Harry M. Ward and Harold E. Greer, Jr., Richmond during the Revolution, 1775-1783, Charlottesville, Va., 1977 description ends ).

23 James Vaughan kept the Richmond tavern on the northwest corner of present Main and Nineteenth streets. From 1775 it was kept by Gabriel Galt and later called the City Tavern (Ward and Greer, Richmond During Revolution, p. 5, 50 description begins Harry M. Ward and Harold E. Greer, Jr., Richmond during the Revolution, 1775-1783, Charlottesville, Va., 1977 description ends ).

24 William and Mary Davis rented the Chickahominy River ferry and its ordinary on the Charles City County side (Virginia Gazette [P & D], 3 Aug. 1769 and 22 Mch. 1770 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ). This ferry was on the road from Williamsburg to Charles City Courthouse generally followed by present State Route 5. TJ always called this ferry by the name of the current tenant: Davis’ (Davies’) until 1770, Lorton’s (Lawthorn’s, Lawton’s) from 1770 to 1774, Foese’s in 1775, and Bryan’s from 1776.

25TJ came to Williamsburg for the October General Court. The site of the “coffeehouse” in this period is still a matter of speculation. It was probably at the Capitol end of Duke of Gloucester Street on the site of the reconstructed Burdett’s Ordinary. It was operated briefly by Richard Charlton in 1767 and by Christiana Campbell from 1769 to 1771. For a general discussion of the term “coffeehouse,” see Carson, Virginians at Play, p. 260-70 description begins Jane Carson, Colonial Virginians at Play, Williamsburg, Va., 1965 description ends .

26 Alexander Craig (c. 1717-1776) was a saddle and harness maker at the site of the restored Alexander Craig House on Duke of Gloucester Street. Unless noted otherwise, the source of all biographical information on Williamsburg merchants and residents is the research files at Colonial Williamsburg.

27 William and Mary Smith were launderers and boardinghouse keepers. Most of TJ’s payments to them during this period were probably for washing.

28 James Craig (d. 1794) was a jeweler at the site of the reconstructed Golden Ball on Duke of Gloucester Street.

29TJ’s parentheses denote transactions that did not enter into his own accounts.

30 Robert Carter (1728-1804) lived until 1772 in the house on Palace Green which bears his name. He then moved to his estate Nomini Hall in Westmoreland County (Louis Morton, Robert Carter of Nomini Hall [Williamsburg, Va., 1941]).

31The James City County ordinary kept by Thomas Doncastle was located between present Toano and Barhamsville, about fifteen miles from Williamsburg on the road to New Kent Courthouse (Virginia Gazette [P & D], 2 Nov. 1769 description begins Virginia Gazette (Williamsburg, 1751-1780, and Richmond, 1780-1781). Abbreviations for publishers of the several newspapers of this name, frequently published concurrently, include: D & H (Dixon & Hunter), P & D (Purdie & Dixon), R (Rind) description ends ).

32 Claiborne’s ferry was on the Pamunkey River, on the road from New Kent Courthouse to King William Courthouse. This King William County ordinary and ferry was called Ruffin’s after 1768 (Arthur P. Gray, “Washington’s Burgess Route,” VMHB, xlvi [1938], 307-8).

33 Thomas Morgan operated TJ’s Shadwell toll mill until it was destroyed in the flood of 1771. He was paid £8 per year.

34 William Terrell Lewis (d. 1802), son of David Lewis, lived west of Charlottesville in the Ivy Creek area (Woods, Albemarle, p. 255 description begins Edgar Woods, Albemarle County in Virginia, 1901, repr. Bridgewater, Va., n.d. description ends ).

35 Richard Harvie, son of John Harvie of Belmont, managed a store in Charlottesville connected with the Glasgow firm Kippen & Co. (TJ notes on account with R. Harvie & Co., 22 July 1795, MHi; “Articles of Copartnership between Harvie & Compy.,” 2 May 1766, Thomas Walker Papers in William C. Rives Collection, DLC).

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