You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Monroe, James
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency
  • Dates From

    • 1801-03-04
  • Dates To

    • 1805-03-03
  • Project

    • Jefferson Papers
Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Project="Jefferson Papers" AND Starting date=4 March 1801 AND Ending date=3 March 1805
Results 1-30 of 35 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I had written the inclosed letter to mrs Trist, and was just proceeding to begin one to you, when your favor of the 6th . was put into my hand. I thank you sincerely for it, and consider the views of it so sound, that I have communicated it to my coadjutors as one of our important evidences of the public sentiment, according to which we must shape our course. I suspect, partly from this, but...
I am late in answering your favor of the 4th. because the Navy department, from an extraordinary press of business, could not till within this day or two furnish me the inclosed papers . you will see by them that the money for Gosport (12,000. D.) has been placed in Norfolk at mr Hopkins’s command, ever since the last week in January. why it should have been witheld so long he will probably...
In mine of the 22d. I forgot to write on the subject of Callender , tho’ I had reserved that, for some time, to make a part of the letter. D.M.R. has contrived to put the money in such a situation that I find we could not lay our hands on it without giving room for specious criticisms. that would be a gratification to which he is not entitled. it will moreover strengthen the reasons for laying...
Since mine of the 26th. Callender is arrived here. he did not call on me; but understanding he was in distress, I sent Capt Lewis to him with 50. D. to inform him we were making some enquiries as to his fine which would take a little time, & lest he suffer in the mean time I had sent him &c. his language to Capt Lewis was very high toned. he intimated that he was in possession of things which...
I have duly recieved your letter of the 22d. instant, covering a copy of your communication to the General assembly, with the documents relative to the conduct of the British Consul at Norfolk who is charged with having recieved and sent out of the state of Virginia, a citizen of that state, under circumstances unauthorised by the existing laws. be assured that the request conveyed in the same...
Your favor of the 16th. came to hand yesterday, & by this day’s post I inclose you a draught on Gibson & Jefferson for 50. D. payable to Majr. Wm. Duval to whom you will be so good as to explain that it is for Genl. Lawson . I now write an answer to the Genl. but will keep it back a couple of days as it furnishes me in that way an excuse for having previously placed the money in Duval’s hands....
In answer to your letter on the paiment of the guards at New-London, I beg leave to mention that it was not till about a fortnight ago that measures could be taken for their relief. a party from some recruits at Winchester was about that time ordered to proceed to New London. so soon as they arrive, the guards you ordered can be dispensed with, and if you will then have the accounts of...
The bearer hereof is mr Whitney of Connecticut a mechanic of the first order of ingenuity, who invented the Cotton gin now so much used to the South; he is at the head of a considerable gun manufactory in Connecticut, and furnishes the US. with muskets, undoubtedly the best they recieve. he has invented moulds & machines for making all the peices of his locks so exactly equal, that take 100...
The inclosed is the result of consideration & consultation between mr Madison & myself. if there be any thing you may think could be changed for the better, send it back , & it shall be altered. I congratulate you on the certain event of peace, whatever it’s conditions may be. health & happiness cum ceteris votis . RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); addressed: “James Monroe Governor of Virginia...
I had not been unmindful of your letter of June 15, covering a resolution of the House of Representatives of Virginia, and referred to in your’s of the 17th. inst. the importance of the subject, and the belief that it gave us time for consideration till the next meeting of the legislature have induced me to defer the answer to this date. you will percieve that some circumstances, connected...
I recieved last night your favor of the 8th. and I readily embrace both ideas of amendment suggested by you. I will pray you therefore in the last page of the letter, lines 9. & 10. to strike out the words ‘him, and executed with the aid of the Federal executive? these’ and insert ‘them. they’ or rather turn ‘him’ into ‘them’ by prefixing a t, and putting a loop to the i, thus e. and turn...
Will you be so good as to deliver the inclosed letters to Prince Ruspoli , to whom I should have sent them before he left this place, but was prevented by indispensable occupations. as I know he is to call on you, the omission can be supplied; the object of the letters being to have him attended to at Monticello. should he be gone, or not go that rout, let them be sent to Monticello, as they...
In a letter from Dupont de Nemours to me is the following passage. ‘Houdon a laissé en Amerique un trés beau buste de Benjamin Franklin, lequel est actuellement chez moi. ce buste en marbre vaut cent louis de notre monnaie, environ 480. D. rien n’est plus convenable a la nation que de la placer dans votre Capitole &c. et Houdon, a qui la Virginie doit encore mille ecus sur la statue de...
Your’s of the 21st. is duly recieved. Chisolm is now engaged in running up for me 20. brick pilasters to my offices, which take about 4000. bricks, and I remember it was very doubtful whether we had that number. but if there be as many over it as you need, they are at your service, and I will give orders accordingly by the next post. I expect to be there myself within 10. days after the rising...
I arrived here yesterday & shall stay here a fortnight only. on my return to Washington I shall have to appoint Commissioners of bankruptcy for the several states. in this I propose to appoint 4. for Richmond & Manchester, and 4. for Norfolk. do you think those of Richmond could serve for Petersburg, or had I better appoint 4. there also. I wish 2. to be lawyers & 2. merchants, tho they might...
I observe that the resolution of the legislature of Virginia , of Jan. 23. in desiring us to look out for some proper place to which insurgent negroes may be sent, expresses a preference of the continent of Africa, or some of the Spanish or Portuguese settlements in S. America: in which preference, & especially as to the former I entirely concur. on looking towards Africa for our object, the...
We are waiting for your recommendation of Commissioners of bankruptcy for Norfolk. Moses Myers & Richd. Evers Lee have been proposed by some. mr Arthur Lee has been thought of. say frankly if any of them are proper or improper. Littleton W. Tazewell if he would accept would make an excellent one: but I believe he lives in or near Williamsburg.—I propose to be at Monticello during Aug. and...
Your favor of the 7th. has been duly recieved. I am really mortified at the base ingratitude of Callender. it presents human nature in a hideous form: it gives me concern because I percieve that relief, which was afforded him on mere motives of charity, may be viewed under the aspect of employing him as a writer. When the Political progress of Britain first appeared in this country, it was in...
After writing you on the 15th. I turned to my letter file to see what letters I had written to Callender & found them to have been of the dates of 1798. Oct. 11. & 1799. Sep. 6. & Oct. 6. but on looking for the letters they were not in their places nor to be found. on recollection I believe I sent them to you a year or two ago. if you have them, I shall be glad to recieve them at Monticello...
I recieved lately a letter from Genl. Lawson solliciting a charity which he desired me to send through your hands. I had yielded last year to an application of the same nature from him and although I think his habits & conduct render him less entitled to it than many others on whom it might be bestowed, yet ( pour la derniere fois ) I inclose for him 30. Dollars which I must ask you to apply...
I should have rode to your house yesterday to speak with you on the subject of your note of the preceding day, but that it rendered it doubtful whether you would not be gone to Richmond. The claim of Maryland to the South branch is under the words of her charter which granted to the meridian ‘ primi fontis fluminis de Potomac ,’ the word primus, there meaning principal or most remote source,...
I now return mr Clarke’s & Shee’s letters inclosed in your’s of yesterday. mr Clarke’s object is to save 6. cents a stock. this is proper for him as an economical manager. but you & I must see of what other aspects it is susceptible. the US. have gun stocks for sale . they are to suspend the sale & lend them to the state of Virginia, that she may return them in kind afterwards with a saving to...
Reynolds , collector of York, is dead, and Wm. Carey of that place is recommended very strongly by mr Shields. tho’ I have great confidence in mr Shields’s recommendation, yet as the best men some times see characters thro’ the false medium of friendship I pray you to make what enquiry you can in Richmond & communicate it to me. Accept assurances of my constant & affectionate esteem & respect....
Commissioners of Bankruptcy. Richmond: George Hay. declined. George Tucker appointed in his place Wm. Duval. George W. Smith. Benjamin Hatcher. declined. Norfolk Lytleton W. Tazewell. declined Richard Evers Lee. Moses Myers. declined Thomas Blanchard. Th: Jefferson to Govr. Monroe. You will see by the above Statement that we are still in want of one Commr. of bankruptcy at Richmd. or...
On reciept of your letter of June 11. in answer to mine of June 3. I wrote to mr King our minister at the court of London, a letter, the copy of which I now inclose you. I trusted we had then time enough to have recieved an answer before the ensuing meeting of the legislature of Virginia. but he probably left England on a visit to the continent a little before the reciept of that letter. as...
S. T. Mason arrived here yesterday. I had immediately a conversation with him on the resignation he had meditated. he finally promised to serve again if reelected, and that he would write to you to say so for him. lest he should delay it, I drop you this line, but you must not name me as the channel because of the ground it furnishes our enemies for clamour. accept assurances of my constant &...
I have but a moment to inform you that the fever into which the Western mind is thrown by the affair at N. Orleans stimulated by the mercantile, & generally the federal interest, threatens to overbear our peace. in this situation we are obliged to call on you for a temporary sacrifice of yourself, to prevent this greatest of evils in the present prosperous tide of our affairs. I shall tomorrow...
Know Ye, That reposing special Trust and confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Abilities of James Monroe, late Governor of the State of Virginia, and of Robert R. Livingston, at present the Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States to the French Republic, I have nominated, and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, appointed them the said Robert R. Livingston to be Minister...
The mail is closing just as the inclosed is put into my hands. tomorrow we shall write to you fully. Adieu. PrC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “James Monroe”; endorsed by TJ in ink on verso. Enclosure: Resolutions of the Senate, 12 Jan., agreeing to Monroe’s appointments as minister extraordinary and plenipotentiary to France and Spain (see TJ to Monroe, 13 Jan. ; JEP Journal of the Executive...
I dropped you a line on the 10th. informing you of a nomination I had made of you to the Senate, and yesterday I inclosed you their approbation not then having time to write. the agitation of the public mind on occasion of the late suspension of our right of deposit at N. Orleans is extreme. in the Western country it is natural and grounded on honest motives. in the seaports it proceeds from a...