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I return the draft corrected agreeably to your intimations. You will observe a short paragraph added respecting Education . As to the establishment of a University, it is a point which in connection with military schools, & some other things, I meant, agreeably to your desire to suggest to you, as parts of your Speech at the opening of the session. There will several things come there much...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President, sends him the statement of facts promised. The date is proposed to be two or three days before the Proclamation, when it was in fact begun. There is a blank to be filled with a quotation from a former proclamation which is not immediately at hand; but the blank will be filled before it goes to the press. If the President...
In answer to an enquiry which you were pleased to make I have the honor to transmit a Communication from the Commissioner of the Revenue of the 25 of December. It is true that there have been some defects of execution, but they are by no means such as in my opinion warrant the strong declaration of Mr Butler and I think it probable that they are to be attributed more to that agent whom he...
About a fortnight since arrived here Mr. Fristel with G W. Fayette son of the Marquis. The former, who is in capacity of Tutor to the latter, requested me to mention their arrival to you, and that they meant to retire to some place in the neighbouring country ’till they should receive some direction from you. Thus at least I understood him—and accordingly they are gone to a house between...
You will probably recollect that previous to your departure from this place, anticipating the event which has taken place with regard to the death of Mr Eveleigh, I took the liberty to mention to you that Mr. Woolcott the present Auditor would be in every respect worthy of your consideration as his successor in office. Now that the event has happened, a concern as anxious as it is natural for...
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
Flattering myself that your knowlege of me will induce you to receive the observations I mak⟨e⟩ as dictated by a regard to the public good, I take the liber⟨ty⟩ to suggest to you my ideas on some matters of delicacy and importance. I view the present juncture as a very interesting one. I need not observe how far the temper and situation of the army make it so. The stat⟨e⟩ of our finances was...
Answers to remaining Questions proposed by the President of The United States on the Question the Answer The War is plainly an offensive war on the part of France. Burlamaqui , an approved Writer Vol II Part IV Chap III Sections IV & V thus defines the different species of War “Neither are we to believe (says he) that he who first injures another begins by that an offensive War, and that the...
Memorandum of the substance of a Communication made on Thursday the Eighth of July 1790 to the Subscriber by Major Beckwith as by direction of Lord Dorchester. Major Beckwith began by stating that Lord Dorchester had directed him to make his acknowlegements for the politeness which had been shewn in respect to the desire he had intimated to pass by New York in his way to England; adding that...
I have received information this morning of a nature which I think you ought to receive without delay. A Mr. Le Guen , a Frenchman, a client of mine and in whom I have inspired confidence, and who is apparently a discreet and decent man, called on me this morning to consult me on the expediency of his becoming naturalized, in order that certain events between France and the U States might not...
I had the honor of writing to you by the post of Monday last, and then transmitted sundry papers respecting a Meeting at Pittsburg on the 21st of August, and other proceedings of a disorderly nature, in opposition to the Laws laying a duty on distilled spirits; and I added my opinion, that it was adviseable for the Government to take measures for suppressing these disorders, & enforcing the...
I arrived here yesterday at Noon and waited upon General Gates immediately on the business of my mission; but was sorry to find his ideas did not correspond with yours for drawing off the number of troops you directed. I used every argument in my power to convince him of the propriety of the measure, but he was inflexible in the opinion that two Brigades at least of Continental troops should...
I have been detained here these two days by a fever and violent rheumatic pains throughout my body. This has prevented my being active in person for promoting the purposes of my errand, but I have taken every other method in my power, in which Governor Clinton has obligingly given me all the aid he could. In answer to my pressing application to General Poor for the immediate marching of his...
At length the recruiting for the additional regiments has begun in Connecticut New York New Jersey Pensylvania and Delaware . The enclosed return of cloathing will sufficiently explain to you that it has commenced at least as soon as the preparations by the Department of War would permit. It might now also proceed in Maryland and Massachusettes, and the next post will I trust enable me to add...
I have analised the declaration which you have been pleased to make upon the copy of the paper of the first instant delivered by me to the committee of Inquiry into the state of the Treasury Department —and find, with regret, that the terms used are such as will enable those, who are disposed to construe every thing to my disadvantage, to affirm “That the Declaration of The President has...
The Secretary of the Treasury having, in consequence of the Act for the Establishment and support of Light houses, directed his Enquiries to that object begs leave most respectfully to submit the result to The President of the United States of America New Hampshire. In this State is only one Light house situated on a point of land on the Island of New-Castle, three miles from Portsmouth,...
I beg leave by way of explanation to submit the grounds of my opinion, that the President may vary his instructions of the 8th of August last in reference to the application of the last loan obtained in Holland. A summary of the preceding transactions will serve to throw light upon the subject. The President by his Commission of the 28 of August 1790, gave full power to the Secretary of the...
I arrived here last night from Albany. Having given General Gates a little time to recollect himself I renewed my remonstrances on the necessity and propriety of sending you more than one Brigade of the three he had detained with him, and finally prevailed upon him to give orders for Glover’s in addition to Patterson’s brigade to march this way. As it was thought conducive to expedition to...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the United States. He was informed yesterday, by the Attorney General, that his opinion concerning the constitutionality of the Representation Bill was desired this morning. He now sends it with his reasons but more imperfectly stated than he could have wished—through want of time. He has never seen the bill, but from the...
I was much surprized on my arrival here to discover that your nomination had been without any previous consultation of you. Convinced of the goodness of the motives it would be useless to scan the propriety of the step. It is taken and the question is—what under the circumstances ought to be done? I use the liberty which my attachment to you and to the public authorises to offer my opinion...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to make the following representation to The President of the United States, in order that he may determine on the expediency of laying the subject of it before Congress. The procuring of military supplies generally, is with great propriety, vested by law in the Department of the Treasury. That Department from situation, may be expected...
I had the pleasure of receiving two days since your letter of the 31 Ulto. A great press of business and an indifferent state of health have put it out of my power sooner to attend to it. The incidents which have lately occurred have been every way vexatious and untoward. They render indispensable a very serious though calm and measured remonstrance from this Government, carrying among others...
I arrived at my own house yesterday evening, where I found your letter of the 14 instant; having previously received that of the 25 of September, by the circuitous route of Albany, the evening before my departure from New York. As to the right of the President to convene Congress out of the ordinary course, I think it stands as follows—“he may on extraordinary occasions convene both houses of...
On my return from Trenton, the day before yesterday, I found your private letter of the 13th. as well as yr. public letter of the 15th. instant. The News papers have probably informed you that poor Avery is dead of yellow fever. The President has resolved to send the commissioners to France notwithstanding the change of affairs there. He is not understood to have consulted either of his...
My anxiety for such a course of things as will most promise a continuance of peace to the country, & in the contrary event a full justification of the President, has kept my mind dwelling on the late Reply to Mr. Adet & though it is a thing that cannot be undone, yet if my ideas are right the communication of them may not be wholly useless for the future. The more I have considered that paper...
The Secretary of the Treasury on the letter from the Minister plenipotentiary of France to the Secretary of State of the 15 instant, respectfully makes the following report to the President of the United States. It is true as alleged by the Minister, that certain drafts of his on the Treasury have not been admitted. Some of them were predicated upon the fund engaged to him in November; but one...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. It has appeared to him that a circular letter of the enclosed form to the several Collectors would be a measure of utility. If not disapproved by the President it will be forwarded. The enclosed paper is sent lest the president should not have received it otherwise. It contains intelligence critically important, tho’...
In my second interview with Major Beckwith which was on Thursday the 22d. instant I spoke to him nearly as follows I have made the proper use of what you said to me at our last interview. As to what regards the objects of a general nature mentioned by you, though your authority for the purpose from Lord Dorchester is out of question, and though I presume from his Lordship’s station & character...
I have been duly honored with your letters of the 26th. and 27th. of October. General Pinckney happening to be at my house when they were received, I communicated them to him, together with such other letters as had come to hand relating to the same subject —and I have since furnished him with the subsequent information transmitted to me, in order that he might take the proper measures in...
The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully begs leave to submit to the President of the United States copies of a letter from Messrs. Wilhem & Jan Willink and Nicholas and Jacob Van Staphorst & Hubbard of the 25th. day of January last, and of an answer thereto of the 7th. day of May following. The President will perceive that the last mentioned letter was formed upon a plan not to discourage...
Two days since, I received from General Wilkinson a Report of which I now send you the original. You will find it intelligent and interesting. Perhaps on the score of intrinsic propriety it deserves to be adopted to a larger extent than some collateral and extraneous considerations may permit. I had previously thought of the subject but had purposely limited myself to a few very general ideas,...
The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred, by the President of the United States a Letter from the Minister of the French Republic to the Secretary of State, dated the 21st instant, respectfully makes the following, Report. The Minister observes, that it results from the report of the Secretary of the Treasy. that upon an accidental error, the interests of the French republic and the...
There are still existing in the army so many abuses absolutely contrary to the military constitution, that, without a speedy stop is put to them, it will be impossible even to establish any order or discipline among the troops. I would, therefore, propose the following Regulations; submitting to His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, to distinguish such as may be published under his own...
We are honored with two letters from Your Excellency of the 10th. and 21st to the contents of which we beg leave to assure you of our strictest attention. That of the 18th. is not yet come to hand, it is not improbable it has gone round by Lewis Town, which has occasioned the delay. Col Hamilton wrote to your Excellency from Philadelphia acquainting you with our arrival there and our intention...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President & sends him two letters which were received last night from Pittsburgh. Would it not be adviseable to put the Garrison of Fort Franklin in the power of Major Butler, so that if he deems it advisable he may draw a part of it to his aid? An attack from the Indians appears at present improbable, & an attack from the Insurgents...
I found Young La Fayette here and delivered him your Letter which much relieved him. I fancy you will see him on the first day of April. Mr. Livingston’s motion in the House of Representatives, concerning the production of papers has attracted much attention. The opinion of those who think here is, that if the motion succeeds, it ought not to be complied with. Besides that in a matter of such...
I was in due time favoured with your letter of the 26 June & consulted the Gentleman you name on the subjects of it. We are both of opinion there is no power in the President to appoint an Envoy Extraordinary, without the concurrence of the senate, & that the information in question is not a sufficient ground for extraordinarily convening the senate. If however the President from his...
In addition to the official report of our proceedings at Amboy, which your Excellency will perceive have terminated in the manner you expected, we have the honor to give you an account of the steps we took, in consequence of the second part of your instructions, relative to a private conversation. But before we enter upon this, we think it our duty to inform you, that we have every reason to...
I have considered the two subjects upon which you desired my opinion as maturely as my situation has permitted. With regard to the proceedings in Kentuke, I perceive nothing that can with propriety or utility be done; unless the Attorney General on full and careful examination should be of opinion that they furnish indictable matter, in which case I should think it very material that...
Previous to the leaving my present Office there are a few points which I think it my duty to bring under the consideration of the President. The first regards the present state and arrangement of the Mint. It is certain that this establishment is capable of producing very important benefits to the community. At this moment when an unusually large and a sudden exportation of silver has produced...
The present situation of the United States is undoubtedly critical and demands measures vigorous though prudent. We ought to be in a respectable military posture, because war may come upon us, whether we choose it or not and because to be in a condition to defend ourselves and annoy any who may attack us will be the best method of securing our peace. If it is known that our principal maritime...
I have been duly honored with your Letters of the 1st and 5th instant. A copy of the latter is enclosed according to your desire. You may depend upon it, Sir, that nothing shall be wanting in this Department to furnish all requisite supplies for the Army with efficiency & œconomy, and to bring to exact account all persons concerned in them as far as shall consist with the powers of the...
Mr. Wolcott has just informed me That the Secretary of State had called upon him, as by your direction, to confer on the subject of a person to be appointed Comptroller, in the event of his appointment as Secretary of the Treasury and intimated that you had concluded to take some Gentleman from the South—that Mr. Habersham, brother of the Collector of Savannah, was more particularly in your...
State of facts as supposed. Mr. Jenet Minister Plenipotentiary from the Republic of France arrives at charsletown. There he causes two privateers to be fitted out, to which he issues Commissions, to cruise against the enemies of France. There also, the Privateers are manned and partly with citizens of the United States, who are inlisted or engaged for the purpose, without the privity or...
I am mortified at not being able to send you by this post a certain draft. But the opinion that reasons ought to be given & pretty fully has extended it to considerable length & a desire to make it accurate as to idea & expression keeps it still upon the anvil. But it is so far prepared that I can assure it by tomorrow’s Post. Delay is always unpleasant. But the case is delicate & important...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to the President—sends him some memorandums of recommendations of officers of Inspection. With regard to the Supervisor of the So. Western Territory, he is of opinion that still further information is necessary. He believes Mr. William Nichols who is the brother of Colo. Nichols to be a fit person for Inspector of the Revenue for the first survey of...
To His Excellency George Washington Esquire General and Commander in chief of the Forces of the United States of America. We the Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency, “to confer, determine and agree upon a Treaty and Convention for the exchange of Prisoners of War, and for all matters whatsoever which may be properly contained therein,” beg leave to report— That, agreeable to Your...
Your letter of the 14th instant did not reach me ’till after the appointments mentioned in it were made. I see clearly in what has been done a new mark of your confidence, which I value as I ought to do. With regard to the delicate subject of the relative rank of the Major Generals, it is very natural for me to be partial judge, and it is not very easy for me to speak upon it. If I know myself...
The draft of a proclamation and that of an instruction to the Commissioners being both prepared, we take the liberty to suggest that we think a meeting tomorrow morning at such hour as may be convenient to the President, may be adviseable. The Secretary of State & Attorney General being out of town we cannot consult them, but we will engage the attendance of the Attorney General provisionally...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto. came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...