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The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States, a Contract made by the Collector of Portsmouth for keeping & supplying the Light house at the mouth of that harbour for six months. It is supposed that this agreement has been confined to the term of six months in order to a future commencement in the beginning of the year. The conditions...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to communicate for the information of the President a letter which he had just received from the Supervisor of North Carolina. The complexion of things there tho’ not pleasing is rather better than worse. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Letter not found. The supervisor of the revenue for North Carolina was William Polk.
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. The name of the person who was employed in superintending the erecting of the Lighthouse by Mr. Newton is Lemuel Cornick . The compensation to the Keeper of the Delaware Lighthouse is 266 Dollars and ⅔ of a Dollar. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Thomas Newton, Jr., inspector of Survey No. 4 in Virginia....
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency lately on a very confidential subjec⟨t⟩ and shall be anxious to know as soon as c⟨on⟩venient whether the letter got safe to han⟨d⟩. The bearer Shattuck thinks he can poin⟨t⟩ out the means of apprehending Wells & Knowle⟨ton⟩ the two persons whom Your Excellency was authorised to have taken into custody. I hav⟨e⟩ desired him to call upon you to...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President & transmits the copy of a paper, which he proposes to communicate to the Committee on the state of the Treasury Department and which he hopes will be found by the President conformable with what passed in the interview of yesterday. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see the...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President has the honor to submit to him the enclosed communications concerning which he will wait upon The President on Monday. 1st Decemr. 1792 LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The very late arrival of the waggons the injury to a number of them & the dispersed situation of the troops render it impracticable to leave this place today as was inten[d]ed. But the baggage & stores go forward & tomorrow the troops must move. I apprehend no material derangement of the general plan. An express has been dispatched to Governor Lee advising him of the state of things here....
Considerations, relative both to the public Interest and to my own delicacy, have brought me, after mature reflection, to a resolution to resign the office, I hold, towards the close of the ensuing session of Congress. I postpone the final act to that period, because some propositions remain to be submitted by me to Congress, which are necessary to the full developement of my original plan,...
By the Act of the last Session entitled “An Act supplementary to the Act making provision for the Debt of the United States,” authority is given to discharge the debts due to foreign Officers out of the monies which the President is authorised to borrow by the Act making provision for the Debt of the United States. The sum authorised to be borrowed by the last mentioned Act is 12.000.000. of...
[ Philadelphia ] September 4, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury requests the favor of the President to send him the communication from the Governor, on which he not long since reported, containing imputations on the conduct of the officers of the UStates employed in the Western Counties. They will be useful in forming the reply to his last letter, in which a considerable progress has been...
I have the honor to send here with sundry papers which relate to the Petition of William Martin & contain full information on the subject. Upon the whole as Mr. Martin is undoubtedly an innocent sufferer, I incline to the opinion that a pardon may be adviseable which would operate to remit one half the penalty incurred. With perfect respect &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of...
Treasury Department, January 15, 179 [ 3 ]. “The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President of the United States the enclosed Letter from the Commissioner of the Revenue respecting the Lighthouse on Tybee Island. The arrangement which he proposes appears to the Secretary an adviseable one.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. This letter is misdated...
[ Philadelphia ] May 7, 1792 . “The Secretary of the Treasury … has the honor to enclose a copy of the Authorisation which the President signed this morning.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Washington to H, May 7, 1792 .
I have the honor of submitting herewith to the President the draft of a power to borrow One million of dollars, by virtue of the Act passed the 9 instant, intitled “an Act making appropriations for certain purposes therein expressed.” I need only observe, as to the necessity of making the loan, that the objects for which the Act provides will call for immediate expenditures and that the funds...
The present is beyond question a great, a difficult & a perilous crisis in the affairs of this country. In such a crisis it is the duty of every man, according to situation, to contribute all in his power towards preventing evil and producing good. This consideration will I trust be a sufficient apology for the liberty I am about to take of submitting without an official call the ideas which...
[ Philadelphia, January 30, 1794. An entry in JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,” George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. on January 30, 1794, reads: “The Secretary of the Treasury enclosed me a letter to him from the Collector of Philada. on the subject of the Ship L’Orient.” Letter not found. ] PP, 268. Letter from Sharp Delany not found. On the same day Washington...
The urgent avocations, in which I have been engaged, towards putting, in a train of execution, the laws of the last session, affecting my department, and a desire of reflecting maturely, and giving the reasons for the result of my reflections, fully, have caused me to delay, longer than I wished, the answers to the questions, with which you honored me, and I hope will excuse the delay. The...
Philadelphia, April 27, 1793. “… The enclosed Letter just received from the Collector of Charleston contains information & raises a question, which are proper for the eye of the President.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Letter from Isaac Holmes not found. This letter is described in an entry in JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,” George Washington Papers,...
Treasury Department, December 5, 1794. “The Secretary of The Treasury has the honor to submit to the President a letter from the Commissioner of The Revenue of the 3d. instant.… The present offer appears admissible. If the President thinks so—his approbation noted on the letter of the Commissioner of the revenue, will put the business in execution.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of...
Treasury Department, May 3, 1794. Encloses “a letter from the Commissioner of the Revenue of the 30th of April, with his opinion that it is adviseable to confirm the purchase of Oil to which it relates.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Tench Coxe to H, April 30, 1794 . Washington approved this purchase on May 3, 1794 ( JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,”...
I am extremely sorry your Excellency has been troubled with the affair to which the papers transmitted in your letter of this morning relate. Admitting the possibility of Doctor Gordons not being the author of what I must always call a calumny, and had he not been an irreconcileable enemy to plain dealing, the matter might have been brought to a very easy issue, without the necessity of an...
[ Philadelphia ] December 5, 1793 . States “that he has reason to believe General Stewart has removed the obstacles to his appointment.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Walter Stewart to H, November 27, 1793 , and H to Washington, November 30, 1793 . Stewart’s appointment as “Surveyor of the district of Philadelphia, and Inspector of the Revenue for the port of...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...
I have been duly honored with your Letters of the 7th and 17th instant, and perceive with much pleasure a confirmation of the expectation which your former communication had given that your view of the measures proper to be pursued respecting the proceedings therein referred to, would correspond with the impressions entertained here. I flatter myself that the Proclamation will answer a very...
When this letter was written, the United States appeared to be closer to war with Great Britain than at any time since the end of the American Revolution. Henry Lee wondered whether Congress intended “to pick a quarrel with G.B.,” and the latest advices from Thomas Pinckney in London left little doubt that he considered the outbreak of war with Britain only a matter of time. In a dispatch...
I have been duly honor’d with your two letters of the 18th and 20th of Septemr. My opinion on a certain subject has been forwarded, and I hope will, ‘ere this, have come to hand. Inclosed you will be pleased to receive a list of such characters, as from the documents furnished by Mr. Lear, from my enquiries, and from the intimations contained in you letter of the 20th, appear to stand, upon...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to communicate to the President a resolution of the Trustees of the Sinking Fund as of this morning. A particular piece of urgent business prevents personally waiting on the President with it. It is very much to be desired that the resolution may receive the immediate decision of the President. It is upon the same principles with the last. LC ,...
I have made the inquiry of General Schuyler which you directed. He says that he thinks Kirkland’s fidelity may be relied on; but does not entertain a very favourable opinion of his judgment or veracity. He says also that there is a Mr James Deane at Onieda who is a man of more discernment discretion and integrity, and who may probably be got here in twelve days. I shall make the inquiry you...
In compliance with your requisition I have the honor to submit my Opinion as to the course which it will be adviseable for the President to pursue in regard to the armed Opposition recently given in the four Western Counties of Pennsylvania to the execution of the laws of the U. States laying duties upon Spirits distilled within the United States and upon Stills. The case upon which an Opinion...
Treasury Department, May 15, 1794. Transmits “for the President’s signature, the draft of a passport upon application from the French Minister.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Edmund Randolph to H, May 15, 1794 .
 3 Brigadiers at 200 600 11 Colonels 100 1100  5 Majors 28 140 20 Captains 16 320 56 first Lieutenants 6 336 72 second Lieutenants and Ensigns—     4   288 2784  9 Reg Qr. Mrs. & Adjutants,
Agreeably to your desire, I sit down to commit a few lines to the Post. Nothing worth particular mention has occured since your Departure; except a report brought by Mr. Keane from So. Carolina, that Mc. Gilivray the Indian Chief had, after a short conference, left our Commissioners, declaring that what they had suggested was only a repetion of the old Storey and inadmissible, or something to...
[ Philadelphia ] July 19, 1793 . Transmits “a letter which he has just received from our Commissioners at Amsterdam.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Willink, Van Staphorst, and Hubbard to H, May 1, 1793 .
I am honored with your letter of the 25th. ultimo, relative to the office of Commissioner of Loans for the State of New Hampshire. It appears most proper that I should postpone any movement upon this subject, ’till I shall Know your pleasure after my letter of the twenty sixth of last month shall reach your hands, and you shall be ascertained of Mr. Langdon’s intentions in regard to the...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States a contract entered into by the Deputy Collector of Wilmington in North Carolina with James McStephens & Henry Toomer for the stakage of the shoals of Cape Fear River. The sum stipulated to be paid, not being considerable, the fixing of new sets of stakes being a part of the business, as...
I perceived by the News Paper that the resolution has been carried. I have not been idle as far a⟨s⟩ my situation would permit but ⟨it⟩ will not be in my power as I had hoped to send you what I am preparing by this day’s Post. The next will carry it. It does not however appear necessary that the Executive should be in a hurry. The final result in my mind, for reasons I shal⟨l⟩ submit in my...
Agreeably to the intimation heretofore given I have the honor now to tender you my resignation of the office of Secretary of the Treasury and to be With sincere respect and affectionate attachment   Sir   Your most Obedient & humble servant ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, December 1, 1794 , January 30, 1795 .
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor to submit to the President a letter which he has drafted in answer to one from the Minister Plenipotentiary of France, and which contains such Ideas as have appeared to him compatible with the Law, with the state of the Treasury and with a liberal attention to the conjuncture. He will wait on the President this evening for his orders, as Mr. Ternant...
Treasury Department, March 9, 1792. “The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to enclose to the President of the United States a petition to the President from Samuel Davis of the State of Rhode Island & providence plantations, together with the papers from the files of the Treasury relative thereto.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this...
I have received your letter of the . Young La Fayette is now with me. I had before made an offer of money in your name & have repeated it—but the answer is that they are not yet in want and will have recourse when needed Young La Fayette appears melancholy and has grown thin. A letter lately received from his mother which speaks of something which she wishes him to mention to you (as I learn...
It appears to be the desire of the writers of the enclosed Letter, that it should be laid before you, for your direction, which I accordingly do. I think the Embargo will operate upon the case, notwithstanding the ultimate destination of the vessel. With perfect respect &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The enclosed letter was probably that of Reed and Forde to H, April...
Mrs. De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville formerly of Holland lately passed through this City. On her way she called upon me and announced her intention to make application to Congress on the ground of the political services rendered the UStates by her husband, as in fact a principal cause of his pecuniary misfortunes—and expressed a wish that I would bring her case under your eye. I told her...
Treasury Department, December 23, 1793. Submits “a communication from the Commissioner of the Revenue of the 18 inst: enclosing a provisional Contract for the Stakage of Neus River in North Carolina; the ratification whereof appears to be for the interest of the Ud. States.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to Washington, August 23, 1793...
The Secretary of The Treasury has the honor to transmit to The President of the U: States a communication of the 18 of April, from the Commissioner of the Revenue, & respectfully submits it as his opinion that the public service will be promoted by the acceptance of the resignation offered, and the appointment of the person recommended as a substitute. With regard to what concerns the...
[ Philadelphia, July 28, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Treasury Department, March 26, 1793. Submits “a communication from the commissioner of the Revenue, relating to a Contract for the building of a Beacon boat for the use of the River and Bay of Delaware.” Concurs in the views of the commissioner. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The letter from Tench Coxe to H has not been found. An entry in JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President incloses a recommendation of persons for officers of the Revenue Cutter in South Carolina. Capt. Cochran who is now here expresses an opinion that as the person recommended for third Mate is very young, it will be adviseable to defer his appointment ’till some further trial of him. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of...
I duly received your letter of the 12th. instant. My avocations have not permitted me sooner to comply with your desire. I have looked over the papers & suggested alterations & corrections; and I have also numbered the paragraphs I. II. III &c in the order in which it appears to me eligble they should stand in the Speech. I thought upon full reflection you could not avoid an allusion to your...
I had lately a visit from a certain Gentleman the sole object of which was to make some observations of a delicate nature, concerning another Gentleman employed on a particular errand; which, as they were doubtless intended for your ear, and (such as they are) ought to be known to you, it is of course my duty to communicate. He began (in a manner somewhat embarrassed which betrayed rather more...
I find that I omitted m in my official reply to avail say any thing on the subject of Major Campbell. On the appointments of this kind for the Troops South of Potowmack it is my intention particularly to consult General Pinckney with the advantage of the observations he shall make on the spot. But I do not publish this lest I should subject the General to embarrassment & ill will. Very Affect...