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A difference of opinion having arisen among those of the Trustees of the Sinking Fund, who are now in this City, respecting the construction of their authority under the Act making provision for the Reduction of the Public Debt, by which they are equally divided, your presence here towards settling the principle which is in question, in order to the future conduct of the business, has become...
When we last conversed together on the subject we were both of opinion that the Minister expected from France should be received. Subsequent circumstances have perhaps induced an additional embarrassment on this point and render it adviseable to reconsider the opinion generally and to raise this further question—Whether he ought to be received absolutely or with qualifications? The King has...
After a plan for fortifying our port shall have been settled, the execution of it with energy & dispatch will demand a very great portion of the time and attention of a competent character as Superintendant. This task I cannot undertake consistently with my other occupations. Col Burr will be very equal to it and will I believe undertake it, if an adequate compensation be annexed. He would...
[ West Point, July 26, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of July 26 not found. ]
Certain Circumstances of a delicate nature have occurred, concerning which The President would wish to consult you. They press. Can you consistently with the Governor’s situation afford us your presence here? I cannot say the President directly asks it, lest you should be embarrassed; but he has expressed a strong wish for it. I remain yr. Affect & Obed ALS , Columbia University Libraries....
The session of Congress is about to close much better than I expected. All mischievous measures have been prevented and several good ones have been established. Among these additional provisions of revenue & some of force are not the least important. But as more immediately connected with the objects of your mission you will learn with satisfaction that the bill which had passed the senate...
The Attorney General has shewn me, in confidence, a late letter of yours to him and has asked my good offices as far as may consist with my judgment. These I always readily yield to misfortune. I have had a full and minute explanation with him of the money subject, and in my mind, there results a full conviction that there is no cause of reproach from that source, whatever may have been...
I was very sorry when at Albany not to have seen you. I called the day after my arrival but you were then indisposed or abroad & the rest of my stay I was very unwell. An apprehension is excited here that in consequence of the Petitions of the Militia Officers the persons named to the new Companies will not be appointed. I take it for granted that this must be a groundless apprehension as far...
The completion of the works in the vicinity of our City proceeds heavily. Some embarrassment is understood to arise in the War Department from the Question of Appropriations. I beg to be informed whether the sum appropriated by the Legislature of this State will come in aid of the Operation. Limited as that sum is, nothing upon a large scale can be undertaken in reference to it. Its Agency in...
I take the liberty to trouble you with some remarks on a matter which to me appears of not a little importance; doubting not that you will use your influence in Congress to procure a remedy for the evil I shall mention, if you think the considerations I shall urge are of that weight they seem in my judgment to possess. You will probably ere this reaches you have heard of the late incursion...
I have occasion for a public purpose to allude to the reprobated instructions to our commissioners for making peace with Great Britain obliging them to act under the direction of the French Assembly. But though I have a general recollection of their tenor it is not precise enough for my object. I take it for granted your papers can afford the exact information. You will much oblige me by...
I had the honor duely to receive Your Excellency’s letter of the 4th instant. I did not immediately answer it from an indistinct and confused recollection that a state of things existed in reference to the opposite party which did not permit my being concerned for the State. It now appears that I was not mistaken, and that I cannot with propriety execute Your Excellency’s desire. With perfect...
The inclosed was intended by the last post, but I was disappointed in sending it. You will find by the papers, that a proclamation has been issued for dissolving the old Assembly; writs are making out for the election of a new. The tories seem to give out that there will be no opposition, but I suspect this as an artifice to throw the people off their guard. I doubt not however the whig...
I have received your Letter of the 25th. Various circumstances have prevented my being ready to make the Report you desire. The Survey of the Port made while I was at Philadelphia was but partial; not extending beyond the Narrows. A survey of the lower part of the Bay, which presents some objects worthy of Consideration, was effected by some of the Commanders of the British Army—And is in the...
We are all here very anxious for the success of Mr Coleman. We know his abilities and we believe in his integrity. Your good disposition towards him is well understood—Yet it is feared that his pecuniary situation may prove an obstacle. It is undoubtedly a good rule to avoid embarrassed men in appointments—yet this like every other general rule may admit of exceptions in special cases. If I...
I am honored with your letter of the 18th which I received with all the pleasure that is inspired by a sincere respect and esteem. I must beg leave to repeat my assurances to you, that whenever I have occasion to trouble you in the epistolary way, unless where the subject should require a return, I shall be sorry, you should think yourself bound by the rules of ceremony; and I shall always...
I received your favour per express, and as the absence of my former respectable correspondents has made a change necessary, I am happy that you have been substituted in their room. Except a body of Militia at and about Pumpton and a few detachments of observation, our whole army is now collected at two points; the main body here, and a division under General Sullivan at Princeton. Though this...
New York, December 18, 1798. “You may remember that I have heretofore recommended to you Mr. Inglis, who studied the law with me, for the Office of Notary. He entertains an idea that a vacancy for such an appointment now exists, and has reminded me of my promise to be useful to him—I with pleasure reiterate my recommendation.…” ALS , Columbia University Libraries. Space left blank in MS. James...
I have the honor to enclose the copy of a letter which I have just received from Mr. Wolcott the auditor of the Treasury. The information which he wishes to obtain being essential to the proper settlement of several accounts of considerable moment, as they affect both the character and interest of the United States; I request the favour of you, Sir, if there be any document in the office of...
I beg your pardon for having omitted to attend earlier to the suggestion in your letter of the 30th. of August respecting the defence of our ports. I am sincere in saying that a charge of this kind would on various accounts be unpleasant to me among the rest as likely to involve ill natured & foolish criticism. But I shall not decline the trust if you think proper to repose it provided the...
Col Laurens, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is on his way to South Carolina, on a project, which I think, in the present situation of affairs there, is a very good one and deserves every kind of support and encouragement. This is to raise two three or four batalions of negroes; with the assistance of the government of that state, by contributions from the owners in...
I this morning received your letter of yesterday. I have seen with pain the progress of the transactions, which have excited irritations between Mr. Livingston and yourself, and as my dispositions to both, in whatever I have had to do with the matter, have been friendly, I should with reluctance do any thing, that might affect either, further than a regard to truth and propriety should make it...
Col Fleury is just setting out for Philadelphia to make some arrangements with the Minister which will probably terminate in his departure from this country. He brings you a very handsome letter from the General to Congress which however he will not deliver ’till he is finally determined to go. This letter you will perceive, from the moderation and caution with which the General usually...
The Baron De Steuben has informed me that he is about to set out for Trenton, where he expects to make application to Congress for a final settlement of his pretensions. I feel myself so much interested in the success of his intended application, that I cannot forbear taking the liberty to recommend his case to your particular patronage. I have been an eye-witness to the services he has...
Mr. Davies, who appreciates your character as he ought, having expressed a desire to be personally acquainted with you, I promised him a letter of introduction. I comply with this promise with the greater pleasure, as the impressions which this Gentleman has made upon me induce me to believe that you will be glad of the opportunity of making his acquaintance. He is Attorney of the UStates for...
I received this day a letter from the President of the United States, requesting me to concert with you the plan, & to superintend the execution of it, for giving effect to the Act of the Legislature of this state for the further Defence of this state and for other purposes. This I am accordingly ready to do, whenever you shall be pleased to require it. With very great respect & esteem I have...
I send you herewith sundry papers and documents, which contain information that may be not useless to you in your mission. I had wished to have found liesure to say many things to you but my occupations permit me to offer only a few loose observations. We are both impressed equally strongly with the great importance of a right adjustment of all matters of past controversy and future good...
The survey of this port to the narrows inclusively has been executed and the expence defrayed out of the funds of the Corporation. But it is interesting to the question of the defence of our port to have a survey of the bay below the narrows to Sandy Hook. There are sand banks critically situated which merit consideration as proper sites for fortification. Such a survey was made under the...
I have already written you by this Post. A further Question occurs. Would not a proclamation prohibitting our citizens from taking Comns. &c on either side be proper? Would it be well that it should include a declaration of Neutrality? If you think the measure prudent could you draft such a thing as you would deem proper? I wish much you could. Truly as Ever ALS , Columbia University Libraries.
Your favours of the 26 of November & 16 instant have duly come to hand. I am ashamed that the former has remained so long unacknowleged; though I am persuaded my friends would readily excuse my delinquencies could they appreciate my situation. Tis not the load of proper official business that alone engrosses me; though this would be enough to occupy any man. Tis not the extra attentions I am...
I thank you for your three letters in compliance with my request. They contain what I desired. But as they mingle the fact, respecting the communication of my letter to you to Lord Grenville, which I always understood to be confidential, I will thank you to send me a certificate of the sentiment which you recollect to have been given by me, and I will beg you to let it be as full and as...
Though I have not performed my promise of writing to you, which I made you when you left this country, yet I have not the less interested myself in your welfare and success. I have been witness with pleasure to every event which has had a tendency to advance you in the esteem of your country; and I may assure you with sincerity, that it is as high as you could possibly wish. All have united in...
It is hardly necessary to inform you that I received your favour in answer to my letter on the subject of Capt Sear’s Expedition; and that I shall be at all times ready to comply with your request of information concerning the state of the province, or any matters of importance that may arise. Any thing that may conduce to the public service or may serve as a testimony of my respect to you...
[ West Point, July 30, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of July 30 not found .]
Notwithstanding the information of this Morning respecting the Insertion in Dunlap’s Paper on Monday, certain reasons determine us rather to return to you the Paper with our certificate. You will find that we have altered nothing material to your purpose. The omission of what concerned the President has proceeded from a scruple about official propriety. We are with respect & esteem   Dr Sir  ...
I beg leave to trouble you with two matters, which if your ideas correspond with mine I doubt not you will employ your influence to effect. One respects Col Malcolm and perhaps may be conducive to the interest of the public—the other respects Mr De Neuville and is only interesting to the feelings of an individual, who if I am not mistaken, with proper allowances for the peculiarities of his...
The proceedings at Pittsburgh, which you will find stated in the in-closed paper and other incidents, in the Western parts of this state, announce so determined and persevering a spirit of opposition to the laws, as in my opinion to render a vigorous exertion of the powers of government indispensable. I have communicated this opinion to the President and I doubt not his impressions will accord...
I inclose you copies of two resolutions which have passed the house of representatives of Virginia. Others had been proposed and disagreed to. But the war was still going on. A spirited remonstrance to Congress is talked of. This is the first symptom of a spirit which must either be killed or will kill the constitution of the United States. I send the resolutions to you that it may be...
I have received your two favours of the 19th instant. I feel as I ought the mark of confidence they announce. But I am obliged by my situation to decline the appointment. This situation you are too well acquainted with to render it necessary for me to enter into explanation. There may arrive a crisis when I may conceive myself bound once more to sacrifice the interest of my family to public...
The bearer of this is Lt Colonel Toussard, a French Officer, who lost his arm in our service during the late war. He is now Lt Colonel of the Regiment Du Cape , and lately from St Domingo with his family. Being desirous of purchasing some lands in our State, he is setting out on a journey to N York and has requested a line introducing him to you. This I readily comply with, as he is generally...
Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand. A temporary absence from this place, some ill health, and much occupation have delayed an acknowlegement ’till this time. Aware of the inconveniences, to which you refer, from the want of a proper provision for defraying the expences of the Courts—I inserted in the estimate presented at the beginning of the session a sum for an...
Your letter of the 5 of November has recently reached me at this place and found me amongst avocations that scarcely leave me a moment to spare. You will probably have learnt from General Clarkson that the survey of the Port has been completed. But I do not recollect that I have had any answer to a suggestion in one of my letters respecting the employment of Engineers to assist in forming the...
Inclosed are communications from the Collector of this Port & from Mr. Seton of New York respecting a vessel for your accommodation. Mr. Trumbal at my request has visited the vessels here & thinks there is none but the Andriana (American) which will answer your purpose. Will you be so good as to decide as shall appear to you best upon the vessel you would like & if at New York Mr. Seton is...
I received your favour and one from Mr. Morris last night by express. The stroke at Ticonderoga is heavy, unexpected and unaccountable. If the place was untenable why not discovered to be so before the Continent had been put to such an amazing expence, in furnishing it with the means of defence? If it was tenable, what, in the name of common sense could have induced the evacuation? I would...
[ West Point, September 12, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of September 12 not found .]
[ Philadelphia, September 17, 1792. On September 27, 1792, Rufus King wrote to Hamilton : “Mr Jay … sent me your Letter of the 17th.” Letter not found. ]
The death of Mr. Remsen presents a vacancy of Notary which will be sought. Two applications are made to me—one by James Inglis Junr. who has just finished a Clerkship with me & taken a license as Atty in the Supreme Court—the other William Coleman lately connected in law business with Col Burr. Inglis is a young man of handsome abilities, of application & of irreproacheable conduct. He is a...
You have been informed of the loss of our Election in this City. It is also known that we have been unfortunate throughout Long Island & in West Chester. According to the Returns hitherto, it is too probable that we lose our Senators for this District. The moral certainty therefore is that there will be an Anti-fœderal Majority in the Ensuing Legislature, and this very high probability is that...
We have received your Letter of the 26th instant. We take to day to revise it and tomorrow or the day after we expect to hand it to some Printer for publication with our Certificate. We are with respect and esteem   Your obedient servants John Jay } Esquires. Rufus King LS , in the handwriting of H, Columbia University Libraries. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to H to...
It is an awkward thing now to tell you that it was early my intention to send you the inclosed. But it is nevertheless true that the idea was repeatedly in my mind with the design of executing it & was as often driven out by the distractions of business &c. Always very truly   Dr Sir   yr Obed ser ALS , sold by Forest H. Sweet, Battle Creek, Michigan, January, 1958, Lot No. 141. Jay endorsed...