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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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I inclose you copies of two resolutions which have passed the house of representatives of Virginia. Others had been proposed and disagreed to. But the war was still going on. A spirited remonstrance to Congress is talked of. This is the first symptom of a spirit which must either be killed or will kill the constitution of the United States. I send the resolutions to you that it may be...
I have received your two favours of the 19th instant. I feel as I ought the mark of confidence they announce. But I am obliged by my situation to decline the appointment. This situation you are too well acquainted with to render it necessary for me to enter into explanation. There may arrive a crisis when I may conceive myself bound once more to sacrifice the interest of my family to public...
The bearer of this is Lt Colonel Toussard, a French Officer, who lost his arm in our service during the late war. He is now Lt Colonel of the Regiment Du Cape , and lately from St Domingo with his family. Being desirous of purchasing some lands in our State, he is setting out on a journey to N York and has requested a line introducing him to you. This I readily comply with, as he is generally...
Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand. A temporary absence from this place, some ill health, and much occupation have delayed an acknowlegement ’till this time. Aware of the inconveniences, to which you refer, from the want of a proper provision for defraying the expences of the Courts—I inserted in the estimate presented at the beginning of the session a sum for an...
Your letter of the 5 of November has recently reached me at this place and found me amongst avocations that scarcely leave me a moment to spare. You will probably have learnt from General Clarkson that the survey of the Port has been completed. But I do not recollect that I have had any answer to a suggestion in one of my letters respecting the employment of Engineers to assist in forming the...
Inclosed are communications from the Collector of this Port & from Mr. Seton of New York respecting a vessel for your accommodation. Mr. Trumbal at my request has visited the vessels here & thinks there is none but the Andriana (American) which will answer your purpose. Will you be so good as to decide as shall appear to you best upon the vessel you would like & if at New York Mr. Seton is...
I received your favour and one from Mr. Morris last night by express. The stroke at Ticonderoga is heavy, unexpected and unaccountable. If the place was untenable why not discovered to be so before the Continent had been put to such an amazing expence, in furnishing it with the means of defence? If it was tenable, what, in the name of common sense could have induced the evacuation? I would...
The death of Mr. Remsen presents a vacancy of Notary which will be sought. Two applications are made to me—one by James Inglis Junr. who has just finished a Clerkship with me & taken a license as Atty in the Supreme Court—the other William Coleman lately connected in law business with Col Burr. Inglis is a young man of handsome abilities, of application & of irreproacheable conduct. He is a...
We have received your Letter of the 26th instant. We take to day to revise it and tomorrow or the day after we expect to hand it to some Printer for publication with our Certificate. We are with respect and esteem   Your obedient servants John Jay } Esquires. Rufus King LS , in the handwriting of H, Columbia University Libraries. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to H to...
When we last conversed together on the subject we were both of opinion that the Minister expected from France should be received. Subsequent circumstances have perhaps induced an additional embarrassment on this point and render it adviseable to reconsider the opinion generally and to raise this further question—Whether he ought to be received absolutely or with qualifications? The King has...
I was very sorry when at Albany not to have seen you. I called the day after my arrival but you were then indisposed or abroad & the rest of my stay I was very unwell. An apprehension is excited here that in consequence of the Petitions of the Militia Officers the persons named to the new Companies will not be appointed. I take it for granted that this must be a groundless apprehension as far...
I take the liberty to trouble you with some remarks on a matter which to me appears of not a little importance; doubting not that you will use your influence in Congress to procure a remedy for the evil I shall mention, if you think the considerations I shall urge are of that weight they seem in my judgment to possess. You will probably ere this reaches you have heard of the late incursion...
I am honored with your letter of the 18th which I received with all the pleasure that is inspired by a sincere respect and esteem. I must beg leave to repeat my assurances to you, that whenever I have occasion to trouble you in the epistolary way, unless where the subject should require a return, I shall be sorry, you should think yourself bound by the rules of ceremony; and I shall always...
I received your favour per express, and as the absence of my former respectable correspondents has made a change necessary, I am happy that you have been substituted in their room. Except a body of Militia at and about Pumpton and a few detachments of observation, our whole army is now collected at two points; the main body here, and a division under General Sullivan at Princeton. Though this...
Col Laurens, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is on his way to South Carolina, on a project, which I think, in the present situation of affairs there, is a very good one and deserves every kind of support and encouragement. This is to raise two three or four batalions of negroes; with the assistance of the government of that state, by contributions from the owners in...
I this morning received your letter of yesterday. I have seen with pain the progress of the transactions, which have excited irritations between Mr. Livingston and yourself, and as my dispositions to both, in whatever I have had to do with the matter, have been friendly, I should with reluctance do any thing, that might affect either, further than a regard to truth and propriety should make it...
I send you herewith sundry papers and documents, which contain information that may be not useless to you in your mission. I had wished to have found liesure to say many things to you but my occupations permit me to offer only a few loose observations. We are both impressed equally strongly with the great importance of a right adjustment of all matters of past controversy and future good...
I beg leave to trouble you with two matters, which if your ideas correspond with mine I doubt not you will employ your influence to effect. One respects Col Malcolm and perhaps may be conducive to the interest of the public—the other respects Mr De Neuville and is only interesting to the feelings of an individual, who if I am not mistaken, with proper allowances for the peculiarities of his...
You have been informed of the loss of our Election in this City. It is also known that we have been unfortunate throughout Long Island & in West Chester. According to the Returns hitherto, it is too probable that we lose our Senators for this District. The moral certainty therefore is that there will be an Anti-fœderal Majority in the Ensuing Legislature, and this very high probability is that...