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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand. A temporary absence from this place, some ill health, and much occupation have delayed an acknowlegement ’till this time. Aware of the inconveniences, to which you refer, from the want of a proper provision for defraying the expences of the Courts—I inserted in the estimate presented at the beginning of the session a sum for an...
I inclose you copies of two resolutions which have passed the house of representatives of Virginia. Others had been proposed and disagreed to. But the war was still going on. A spirited remonstrance to Congress is talked of. This is the first symptom of a spirit which must either be killed or will kill the constitution of the United States. I send the resolutions to you that it may be...
Certain Circumstances of a delicate nature have occurred, concerning which The President would wish to consult you. They press. Can you consistently with the Governor’s situation afford us your presence here? I cannot say the President directly asks it, lest you should be embarrassed; but he has expressed a strong wish for it. I remain yr. Affect & Obed ALS , Columbia University Libraries....
I have the honor to enclose the copy of a letter which I have just received from Mr. Wolcott the auditor of the Treasury. The information which he wishes to obtain being essential to the proper settlement of several accounts of considerable moment, as they affect both the character and interest of the United States; I request the favour of you, Sir, if there be any document in the office of...
I this morning received your letter of yesterday. I have seen with pain the progress of the transactions, which have excited irritations between Mr. Livingston and yourself, and as my dispositions to both, in whatever I have had to do with the matter, have been friendly, I should with reluctance do any thing, that might affect either, further than a regard to truth and propriety should make it...
The Baron De Steuben has informed me that he is about to set out for Trenton, where he expects to make application to Congress for a final settlement of his pretensions. I feel myself so much interested in the success of his intended application, that I cannot forbear taking the liberty to recommend his case to your particular patronage. I have been an eye-witness to the services he has...
Though I have not performed my promise of writing to you, which I made you when you left this country, yet I have not the less interested myself in your welfare and success. I have been witness with pleasure to every event which has had a tendency to advance you in the esteem of your country; and I may assure you with sincerity, that it is as high as you could possibly wish. All have united in...
I am honored with your letter of the 18th which I received with all the pleasure that is inspired by a sincere respect and esteem. I must beg leave to repeat my assurances to you, that whenever I have occasion to trouble you in the epistolary way, unless where the subject should require a return, I shall be sorry, you should think yourself bound by the rules of ceremony; and I shall always...
[ West Point, September 12, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of September 12 not found .]
[ West Point, July 30, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of July 30 not found .]
[ West Point, July 26, 1779. On September 18, 1779, Jay wrote to Hamilton : “Your favors of the 25, 26, & 30 July & 12 Inst have thus long remained unanswered.” Letter of July 26 not found. ]
Col Fleury is just setting out for Philadelphia to make some arrangements with the Minister which will probably terminate in his departure from this country. He brings you a very handsome letter from the General to Congress which however he will not deliver ’till he is finally determined to go. This letter you will perceive, from the moderation and caution with which the General usually...
I beg leave to trouble you with two matters, which if your ideas correspond with mine I doubt not you will employ your influence to effect. One respects Col Malcolm and perhaps may be conducive to the interest of the public—the other respects Mr De Neuville and is only interesting to the feelings of an individual, who if I am not mistaken, with proper allowances for the peculiarities of his...
Col Laurens, who will have the honor of delivering you this letter, is on his way to South Carolina, on a project, which I think, in the present situation of affairs there, is a very good one and deserves every kind of support and encouragement. This is to raise two three or four batalions of negroes; with the assistance of the government of that state, by contributions from the owners in...
I received your favour and one from Mr. Morris last night by express. The stroke at Ticonderoga is heavy, unexpected and unaccountable. If the place was untenable why not discovered to be so before the Continent had been put to such an amazing expence, in furnishing it with the means of defence? If it was tenable, what, in the name of common sense could have induced the evacuation? I would...
I received your favour per express, and as the absence of my former respectable correspondents has made a change necessary, I am happy that you have been substituted in their room. Except a body of Militia at and about Pumpton and a few detachments of observation, our whole army is now collected at two points; the main body here, and a division under General Sullivan at Princeton. Though this...
The inclosed was intended by the last post, but I was disappointed in sending it. You will find by the papers, that a proclamation has been issued for dissolving the old Assembly; writs are making out for the election of a new. The tories seem to give out that there will be no opposition, but I suspect this as an artifice to throw the people off their guard. I doubt not however the whig...
It is hardly necessary to inform you that I received your favour in answer to my letter on the subject of Capt Sear’s Expedition; and that I shall be at all times ready to comply with your request of information concerning the state of the province, or any matters of importance that may arise. Any thing that may conduce to the public service or may serve as a testimony of my respect to you...
I take the liberty to trouble you with some remarks on a matter which to me appears of not a little importance; doubting not that you will use your influence in Congress to procure a remedy for the evil I shall mention, if you think the considerations I shall urge are of that weight they seem in my judgment to possess. You will probably ere this reaches you have heard of the late incursion...