Alexander Hamilton Papers
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Report on the Petition of Benjamin Brown, [21 November 1792]

Report on the Petition of Benjamin Brown

[Philadelphia, November 21, 1792
Communicated on November 22, 1792]1

[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives]

The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred, by the House of Representatives, the petition of Benjamin Brown,2 submits the following Report thereupon.

The Act of the last Session, entitled “An Act providing for the settlement of the claims of persons under particular circumstances barred by the limitations heretofore established,”3 removes all obstacles to the claim of the petitioner, arising from the Acts of limitation4 if otherwise well founded.

But it appears, that Peter Greene, Attorney to Benjamin Brown, received, on the 13th of August 1788, a Certificate from the Commissioner for settling the accounts of the Marine Department, for the balance of pay due to said Brown for his services on board the Frigate Trumbull; which satisfies the claim of the petitioner.

Respectfully submitted,

Alexander Hamilton
Secry of the Treasry.

Copy, RG 233, Reports of the Treasury Department, 1792–1793, Vol. III, National Archives.

1Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 625–26. The communicating letter, dated November 21, 1792, may be found in RG 233, Reports of the Treasury Department, 1792–1793, Vol. III, National Archives.

2On July 30, 1790, the petition of Benjamin Brown was “presented to the House and read … praying the liquidation and settlement of a claim against the United States.

Ordered, That the said … [petition] be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, with instruction to examine the same, and report his opinion thereupon to the House.” (Journal of the House, I description begins Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States (Washington, 1826), I. description ends , 285.)

3Section 1 of this act reads as follows: “Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the operation of the resolutions of the late Congress of the United States, passed on the second day of November, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, and the twenty-third day of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, so far as they have barred, or may be construed to bar the claims of any officer, soldier, artificer, sailor or marine of the late army or navy of the United States, for personal services rendered to the United States, in the military or naval department, shall from and after the passing of this act, be suspended, for and during the term of two years. And that every such officer, soldier, artificer, sailor and marine having claims for services rendered to the United States, in the military or naval departments, who shall exhibit the same, for liquidation, at the treasury of the United States, at any time during the said term of two years, shall be entitled to an adjustment, and allowance thereof on the same principles, as if the same had been exhibited, within the term prescribed by the aforesaid resolutions of Congress: Provided, That nothing herein shall be construed to extend to claims for rations or subsistence money” (1 Stat. description begins The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America (Boston, 1845). description ends 245 [March 27, 1792]).

4JCC description begins Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (Washington, 1904–1937). description ends , XXIX, 866; XXXIII, 392. See also “Report on Sundry Petitions,” April 16, 1792.

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