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[ London, February 4, 1797. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
[ Philadelphia, June 10, 1795. On June 11, 1795, Hamilton wrote to King : “I thank you for your letter of the 10th.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, April 1, 1796. On April 2, 1796, Hamilton wrote to King : “Thank you for yours of yesteday.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, June 14, 1793. On June 15, 1793, Hamilton wrote to King : “The ideas expressed in your letter of the 14th correspond with my view of the subject.” Letter not found. ]
[ London, August 6, 1796. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
[ New York, August 10, 1793. On August 13, 1793, Hamilton wrote to King : “The Post of to day brought me your letter of the 10th.” Letter not found. ]
The inclosed letter will give you all the information that we have on the Subject to wh. it relates. It seems problematical whether PH. can be induced to agree in the arrangement —some circumstances of which I have lately heard incline me to believe that he will not. Our session will close by the first of June provided no farther impediment is thrown in the way of the Provision for giving...
Immediately after the publication of the Letter from the french Government to their Minister Barthelemi at Basle, announcing their determination to seize the cargoes of neutral vessels destined to the English Ports, I wrote to Mr. Monroe informing him that the Br. Gov. disavowed the having issued any recent order for the capture of neutral Cargoes bound to french Ports as alledged in the...
Care has been taken to put our friends at the eastward on their guard. Measures have been pursued to ascertain opinions in different quarters, and on this as on a former occasion, the object may be silently abandoned should it appear absolutely desperate. If Clinton should be supported this will be the case; if not the Party must resort to some other northern character, hence the Hopes of this...
[ New York, March 24, 1791. “The Legislature of this State have incorporated the Bank, limiting its capital to a million of Dollars and its duration to twenty years . The Treasurer is authorised to subscribe to the Loan proposed to Congress all the Continental paper in the Treasury and by a bill that passed the Legislature this morning, he is directed to take in behalf of the State, one...
The Subscribers appointed on the part of Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Burke to consider whether there was an honorable Ground of accomodation between the parties in respect to certain Expressions made use of by Mr. Burke in the house of Representatives on Wednesday last, relatively to an Eulogium pronounced by Mr. Hamilton on general Green on the 4th. of July last, having inquired into the...
If the enemies of the Government are secret and united we shall lose Mr. Adams. Burr is industrious in his canvass and his object is well understood by our Antis. Mr. Edwards is to make interest for him in Connecticut, and Mr Dallas who is here, and quite in the Circle of the Governor & the Party, informs us that Mr. Burr will be supported as V. President in Pennsylvania. Should Jefferson &...
You will see by our papers to what we are tending —hitherto I have been quite aside, and have not engaged in the controversy. The addresses from albany and other northern Towns, together with Mr. Jays answers leave no room to doubt that the question will be brought to a decision in some way or other—if it can be done under any authority of Law I shall rejoice, because I consider the...
It would have been agreeable to this Government if we would have agreed to the appointment of Doct. Swabey as the fifth commissioner; he is really a very candid and honorable man, but for the same reason that we could not satisfy the Commissioners on the part of G.B. with the appointment of our Country man Colo Trumbull, an equally candid and honorable character, they have been unable to...
In committee of the whole on friday it was resolved by the casting vote of Muhlenburgh the chairman, to make provision by Law for carrying the Treaty with England into Effect. Yesterday the Resolution of the Committee of the whole was passed in the House by 51. against 48. A proposition to prefix to the Resolution a Preamble declaring the Treaty to be injurious to the Interest of the US. and...
About a Fortnight since I wrote to you intimating the probability that Mr. Jay & I should call on you and General Knox on the subject of Mr Genets Declaration that he would appeal from the President to the people. A letter of this date from Mr. Jay & me will inform you & the General of the present posture of this Business—you will perceive that the Statement that we have concluded to publish,...
You will recieve herewith enclosed a Publication by Mr Genet denying his having declared that he wd. appeal from the President to the People —a publication by us that we would shortly proceed to state the Evidence and Circumstances relative to that Transaction, and also our manuscript address to the public containing such Statemt. We think it more expedient as well as more delicate with...
The fall of Bank certificates may have some good effects, it will operate to deter our industrious citizens from meddling in future with the funds, & teach them contentment in their proper vocations. So far as I am informed, the loss will be divided among a great number of individuals, and where it is heaviest, the sufferers will generally be characters who will neither excite nor deserve...
In general I agree in the Course you recommend. Separate Bills will be reported to the House this morning, providing for the Sp. Ind. & Alg. Treaties—they will pass the H. and be sent to the Senate by the middle of the week. I percive no impropriety in adding to the first of these Bills recived by the Senate, and in succession to each of them if requisite, a Provision for the Br. Treaty. Such...
I have had the pleasure to receive your Letter of the 16. of Decr. and I need not express the Satisfaction which the information that it contained afforded me, the Probable termination of the Election of Pr. the general Temper of the Country, & the Effect likely to be produced by Mr. Adet’s notes are such as I had not only hoped but expected; if by prudence & Firmness, which have hitherto kept...
The french fleet from the Chesapeak arrived here yesterday, and are in the north river above the Battery. The Ambuscade also arrived last Evening and her accounts, confirmed by those of many Spectators of the combat, have no doubt of the Flight of the English Frigate. (You will have seen in our news papers, an invitation for a meeting in the Fields to address Mr. Genest who is daily expected...
The Petitions of the Merchants and others will be printed today, and it is said they have been signed by almost every Merchant & Trader in the City —Pettit, Barclay, & some few others are exceptions. A counter Petition has been very industriously carried through the City and its Suburbs; and though very few merchants, Traders, or principal mechanicks have signed it, it will shew a long...
Averse to any connexion with the war beyound what may be permitted by the laws of strict neutrality, we are pleased to see the Proclamation. I have no precedents with which to compare it, but I could have wished to have seen in some part of it the word “Neutrality,” which every one would have understood and felt the force of. Having anxiously considered the point respecting which we conversed...
I send you Dunlap of this Morning, in it you have the foreign intelligence. Fenno Dunlap & others have erroneously stated that Mr Warder brought the Ratification of Great Britain—no official Dispatch has been received. Rutledge was negatived yesterday by the Senate. From present appearances the address to the President by the House will pass without a Debate. The Draft has been by agreement in...
I received this morning a Letter from Mr. Monroe dated Paris August 28. of which the following is an extract—“As soon as the order of this Government , as notified by the minister of foreign Affairs to Barthelemi the present Ambassador at Basle appeared in the Papers, for it was never notified to the foreign ministers here, I applied for information whether orders were issued for the Seizure...
Not finding Philadelphia notes to remit, I have directed Specie to be sent to you, by the messenger of the Branch, who sets out tomorrow. Will not the late change of affairs in Holland enable you to proceed with a loan? On every account, it would be truly advantageous, if you had a handsome Sum to invest at this Time. The Bank you are sensible are disposed to do all in their power, but...
Mr. Jay will be with you this week —you will therefore have an opportunity to converse with him respecting our very unpleasant situation. All the measures which have been pursued have been calculated to induce the Legislature to call a convention to revise the decision of the canvassers. So far as I am able to form an Opinion, a majority of the Assembly are Clintonians, and if so, will not...
The Arch Duke having expelled Jourdan & Moreau from Germany the Parties are in respect to territory in this Quarter where they were when the campaign began. Buonaparte by the latest accounts from Italy is critically circumstanced, and it seems not improbable that he likewise will be compelled to retire from Lombardy. The mission of Lord Malmesbury remains undecided, and though the negotiation...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 9, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few words inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXX” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 14, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words and phrases inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXIII” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.