Alexander Hamilton Papers
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From Alexander Hamilton to James Duane, 26 September 1783

To James Duane

Albany 26 Sepr. 1783

Dr. Sir,

I received last night your letter of the 8th. instant,1 accompanied by one from Mr. L’hommedieu and yourself to Mr. Floyd and myself.2 I shall in consequence write to the Governor on the subject; though if I recollect right, I did in an official letter to him mention all that I can now say though perhaps at greater length—to wit that the resolutions of the senate & Assembly were committed for consideration and that it appeared to be the prevailing opinion of Congress to postpone a determination on them ’till they had settled a permanent plan for a peace establishment, comprehending of course a provision for the garrison in this state; making in the mean time temporary provision out of the troops already in Continental pay and service. Be pleased to communicate this to Mr. L’Hommedieu with my compliments.

Perceiving your uneasiness lest any accident should happen to Mr Carter’s3 papers if left, I did as you proposed, force open the box and took them out, afterwards closing it again; and communicated my having done it to you in Congress; but you were so much engaged at the time that it appears it did not remain in your memory.

General Schuyler & the ladies present their compliments.

I am Dr Sir   Yr. affectionate & Humble servt

A Hamilton

I take the liberty to inclose a letter to Mrs. J Morris4 for more safe conveyance; which I beg the favour of you to forward.

The Honble Mr. Duane

ALS, New-York Historical Society, New York City.

1Letter not found.

2The letter from Duane and Ezra L’Hommedieu to H and William Floyd is dated September 1, 1783. The controversy over whether the frontier posts should be garrisoned by state or Continental troops can be followed in the documents listed in note 1 of that letter.

3John Carter (John B. Church).

4Presumably Mrs. Jacob Morris of Philadelphia whose husband was deputy quarter-master of the Continental Army during the American Revolution.

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