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An act to empower and direct the Delegates of this State in Congress to accede to ratify and confirm the Sovereignty and Independence of the People of the Territory commonly called and known by the name of the State of Vermont. Be it enacted by the People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, and it is hereby enacted by the Authority of the same that the Delegates of...
The hon. Mr. Hamilton . Mr. Chairman, in the course of these debates, it has been suggested, that the state of New-York has sustained peculiar misfortunes, from the mode of raising revenues by requisitions. I believe we shall now be able to prove, that this state, in the course of the late revolution, suffered the extremes of distress on account of this delusive system. To establish these...
These Resolutions were introduced to shew that it was the settled opinion of the Legislature as well before as after the Confederation that the Powers of Congress were inadequate— Mentioning the Subject of a Dictator was not necessary— The Gent. says he is for an energetic fœderal Govt —what is it If what we Contend for by this System A Measure of Impost was once passed in this State—but...
To the People of the State of New-York. IT may be contended perhaps, that instead of occasional appeals to the people, which are liable to the objections urged against them, periodical appeals are the proper and adequate means of preventing and correcting infractions of the Constitution . It will be attended to, that in the examination of these expedients, I confine myself to their aptitude...
Mr. Hamilton said that he had been restrained from entering into the discussions by his dislike of the Scheme of Govt. in General; but as he meant to support the plan to be recommended, as better than nothing, he wished in this place to offer a few remarks. He liked the new modification, on the whole, better than that in the printed Report. In this the President was a Monster elected for seven...
Mr. Hamilton concurred with Mr. Gerry as to the indecorum of not requiring the approbation of Congress. He considered this as a necessary ingredient in the transaction. He thought it wrong also to allow nine States as provided by art XXI. to institute a new Government on the ruins of the existing one. He wd. propose as a better modification of the two articles (XXI & XXII) that the plan should...
[ New York ] March 11, 1789 . At a meeting of the New York Society of the Cincinnati “held on the 11th of March, at the Holland Lodge, Hamilton informed the Society that he intended to move at the next meeting, for the following By-Law, to be annexed to those already established by the Society, to wit: ‘That each Treasurer of the Society, before he enters upon the execution of his office,...
Philadelphia, June 2, 1787. On this date Benjamin Franklin moved that the expenses of the proposed Executive should be paid but that he should receive “no salary, stipend fee or reward whatsoever” for his service. “The motion was seconded by Col. HAMILTON with the view he said merely of bringing so respectable a proposition before the Committee, and which was besides enforced by arguments that...
The Committee to whom were referred the proceedings of the Society of the Cincinnati, at their last General Meeting, beg leave to report: that they have attentively considered the alterations proposed at that meeting to be made in the original Constitution of the Society; and though they highly approve the motives which dictated those alterations, they are of opinion it would be inexpedient to...
The intention of this bill was to enable the commissioners of the land office to convey to Mr. Noble, two townships of ten miles square, at one shilling per acre, for the purpose of settling Irish emigrants. On considering this bill by paragraphs, some conversation arose in which Gen. Malcom, Col. Hamilton, and Mr. Jones were the principal speakers. Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Jones were both of...
Ham[ilton]—is willing those who are now scrupulous may be exempted— but does not wish to encourage this idea— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . H’s remarks concerned the fifteenth proposal of the “Bill of Rights,” which reads as follows: “That any person religiously scrupulous of bearing...
I Various Interests Navigating and Non Navigating— Great and Small— Struggle for Commercial point two thirds Struggle for equal power— Some small states non navigating— Hence tendency to combination Necessity of accommodation— Oeconomy— Relate difficulties on this point As to the ratios of representation I Character of slaves mixed persons & property II In many states persons included in census...
To the People of the State of New-York. THE effects of union upon the commercial prosperity of the States have been sufficiently delineated. Its tendency to promote the interests of revenue will be the subject of our present enquiry. The prosperity of commerce is now perceived and acknowledged, by all enlightened statesmen, to be the most useful as well as the most productive source of...
Mr. Hamilton, from the Committee appointed to consider of and report on the letter from the Secretary of Foreign Affairs, to his Excellency the Governor, and the papers accompanying the same, together with the act of the Legislature, entitled, An act relative to Debts due to Persons within the Enemies Lines , reported, that it is the opinion of the Committee, that the said act ought to be...
That the persons intitled to lands by virtue of such warrants shall be at liberty to locate them on any part of the two tracts or districts of land reserved and set apart for the purpose of satisfying the military bounties due to the late army provided that each location be made either in contact with some point or part of the external boundary of the said tracts respectively or of some prior...
Mr. Hamilton . We shall make the same reservation. By the indisputable construction of these resolutions, we shall prove that this state was once on the verge of destruction, for want of an energetic government. To this point we shall confine ourselves. Childs, Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York The Debates and Proceedings of the State of New-York, Assembled at...
A letter of the 1st inst. says, “That on Saturday the 28th ult. the Convention were still discussing the 1st clause of the 8th section of the 1st article, respecting the powers of Congress. Objections were at large stated, and amendments proposed by Mr. Williams, Mr. Smith and Mr. Lansing, who were answered by Mr. Hamilton in a most animated and powerful defence of the clause. Mr. Lansing in...
Mr. Hamilton 2ded. the motion, but he said with a different view from Mr. Gerry. He did not object to the consequence stated by Mr. Gerry. There was no greater evil in subjecting the people of the U.S. to the major voice than the people of a particular State. It had been wished by many and was much to have been desired that an easier mode for introducing amendments had been provided by the...
Mr. Hamilton then moved to postpone art XXI in order to take up the following, containing the ideas he had above expressed, viz Resolved that the foregoing plan of a Constitution be transmitted to the U.S. in Congress assembled, in order that if the same shall be agreed to by them, it may be communicated to the Legislatures of the several States, to the end that they may provide for its final...
Philadelphia, June 4, 1787. To a motion by James Wilson, seconded by James Madison, that “a convenient number of the National Judiciary” act with the executive in vetoing acts of the national legislature, Hamilton made “an objection of order … to the introduction of the last amendment at this time.” Hunt and Scott, Debates Gaillard Hunt and James Brown Scott, eds., The Debates in the Federal...
Ham[ilton]—this article he thinks includes more than gent intend—in the Admiralty—& Chancery there is no Jury—“ to remain ” may be intended to qualify this—in some states—the trial by jury in both the Courts above ment[ione]d are in use—On treaties & Laws of nations—the supreme Judicial ought to be the last resort—difficult to remedy this—so as to agree to it—& not clash with other states—...
New York, February 13, 1787. Hamilton spoke on the report of a “committee on the petition of those citizens of this state who have loaned their money during the late war, in Hartford, praying this state to take those monies on loan, and put them on the footing of other citizens, who loaned their money at the continental loan-office in this state.” Hamilton, according to the newspaper account...
To the People of the State of New-York. THE next view which I shall take of the House of Representatives, relates to the apportionment of its members to the several States, which is to be determined by the same rule with that of direct taxes. It is not contended that the number of people in each State ought not to be the standard for regulating the proportion of those who are to represent the...
Ham[ilton]—combats the propriety of the word “ expresly ” congress one to regulate trade—now they must do a thousand things—not expresly given—Virginia say not given — Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. See “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 19,” note 1 . H’s remarks were on the proposed explanatory amendment. It reads as follows: “That no...
The Gentleman who spoke yesterday has been treated as having dealt in the flowry Fields of Immagination I agree if this Governt. is dangerous to the Liberties of the People let us reject it— Tho no Considerations of Danger should induce us to adopt a Governmt. radically bad—yet it was prudent to weigh those Moti[v]es which might induce us to attend those Considerations which involve public...
SCHEDULE C Abstract of the Liquidated and Loan-Office Debt of the United States, on the 3d March , 1789. Dollars.   90ths. Registered Debt, 4,598,462.  78 Credits given to sundries on the treasury books, by virtue of special acts of Congress, which are not yet put on the Funded Debt, 187.578.  65 Certificates issued by the commissioner of army accounts, deducting those which have been...