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Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
Results 121-150 of 836 sorted by date (descending)
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter dated the 13th.—accompanied by one addressed to General Morgan. I will forward the letter to Gener[a]l Morgan by the first conveyance, and add my particular wishes that he would comply with the request contained in it. Although I can scarcely imagine how the Watch of a British Officer, killed within their lines, should have fallen into his hands...
The Comittee to whom was referred the report of the Secretary for the Department of foreign affairs of the 14th instant submit the following resolutions That the secretary for the department of foreign affairs be directed to transmit copies of the papers referred to in the said report to the Chargé des affaires of the United States at Madrid and instruct him to represent to his Catholic...
Since I had the Honor to address you 23rd. Inst. on the Subject of——; I have had the pleasure of a Full Conversation with Mr. A. He is Zealous in the matter and assures me he will go forward in one of the New York Packets by the last of this Week. I have wrote Mr. H. on the Subject and Warmly urged the Necessity of his going on with his Colleague Mr. A. and have made him an offer of a Draught...
Philadelphia, August 23, 1788. Requests information respecting Forman’s claim against the estate of Philip Livingston. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Forman was a former New Jersey Loyalist and at this time was practicing law in Philadelphia.
Your favr. of 12th. Inst. I Recd. not ’till yesterday haveing Just then Returned from the Country where I have been attending a Niece of mine who lays Dangerously ill. As your Communications are of a Delicate Nature, be assured Sr. I will hold them in the Fullest Confidence. Mr. A. Will be with you in the Question; Mr. H. I have not Seen. The principle Characters here are not So anxious about...
Philadelphia, August 20, 1788. Sends Hamilton an abstract of John Holker’s “title to lands in N York State offered by him as a substitute to Mr Church & others who have commenced suits against him for protested bills in place of his bail in said suits.” Asks Hamilton about the validity of this title. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Chaloner wrote to H in the latter’s capacity as...
I have this moment received your letter of the thirteenth instant, and am sorry that the rules of propriety in respect to my situation, as a member of Congress, will not permit my acting in the capacity you wish. My situation for some time past has prevented my acknowleging one or two of your favors, which have been duly handed to me. I recollect that one of them contains an inquiry concerning...
I have been informed Congress have appointed a Committee to examine into the situation of their Contract made with Mr James Jarvis for the Loan of a quantity of Coined Copper and that said Committee had reported that said Contract Was Void should an action be Commenced against Mr Jarvis for damages. I hope you will be pleased to Consider yourself as his attorney in the suit provided there...
Capt Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of _____ _____). In compliance with his request I have written the letter herewith (to_____ _____) which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to...
We have a question of very great importance depending in Congress, in which the vote of your state would be decisive. It relates to the place of meeting of the future Congress—Six states and a half prefer New York five and a half Philadelphia. When your delegates were here they voted with us on the intermediate questions; but when the final question came to be put Mr. Hazard’s scruples...
We do certify that Mr Yates has delivered to us a Paper subscribed by him (of which the preceeding is a Copy) as declaritive of his Principles on which he will vote in Congress in the affirmative on the final Question on the Ordinance for putting the new Constitution for the United States into Operation. DS , in the handwriting of Ezra L’Hommedieu, Abraham Yates Papers, MS Division, New York...
Whereas the Convention assembled at Philadelphia in the Commonwealth of Pensylvania did on the 17th day of September last past resolve as the opinion of that Convention that as soon as the Conventions of nine states should have ratified the Constitution then and there agreed upon by the said Convention the United States in Congress assembled should fix a day on which electors should be...
Poughkeepsie, New York, July 26, 1788. “We the members of the Convention of this State, have deliberately & maturely considered the Constitution proposed for the united States. Several articles in it appear so exceptionable [to a majority of us], that nothing but the fullest confidence of obtaining a Revision of them by a general convention, and an invincible Reluctance to separating from our...
Ham[ilton]—Was in hopes this Morning of Unanimity when this Motion was first mentioned. Thot more favourably of it than the other one but since thinks otherwise. Has taken advice with men of character—they think it will not do. Proposed to read a Letter— reads it—supposes this adoption—conditional—and would viciate the business &ct. Himself wrote favourably for it. The terms of the...
[Matthew] Adgate—This business has been effected by degrees. This has heretofore been conceived to have been a Mode that would bring us in. Gent[lemen] now say we cannot—but if we May does not doubt we shall —they must violate the old Confedn. Ham[ilton]—Adg[at]e intimates that they have come down to our Ideas. This is not so—yet we are willing to go as far as we can and be received. The...
Ham[ilton]—thinks we ought to proceed on the report—& if any gent[leman] wishes to introduce an amend[men]t he has a right to do it. Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. For a discussion of the debates on July 23 and of the decisions made by the Convention on that date, see “New York Ratifying Convention. First Speech of July 24 .”
Your brother delivered me your favour which I received with pleasure as the basis of a correspondence that may be productive of public good. The accession of Vermont to the Confederacy is doubtless an object of great importance to the whole, and it appears to me that this is the favorable moment for effecting it upon the best terms for all concerned. Besides more general reasons, there are...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs. Affecly I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover...
Hamilton objects because there is no security in it—the people are excluded from chusing perhaps your best man— [Melancton] Smith would rather have him elected for 8 yrs & not eligible again—Mov[e]d for it—Jay seconded his Mot[io]n. Ham[ilton]—opposes—a temptation for an avaritious man—to plunder & make the best of his time—has not the motive to please— [Melancton] Smith Much may be said on...
Ham[ilton]—among other reasons ag[ains]t it— mentions the probability of having the appointments better thro[ugh] the states, as the senators represent all the states— Gilbert Livingston Papers, MS Division, New York Public Library. H was opposing an amendment which provided “That the Congress appoint in such manner as they may think proper a Council to advise the President in the Appointment...
That the last mentioned Amendment having been read Mr. Hamilton moved that the same should be obliterated and the following inserted in its stead vizt. “That When the Number of Persons in the District of Territory to be laid out for the Seat of the Government of the United States, shall according to the Rule for the Apportionment of Representatives and direct Taxes Amount to such District...
Ham[ilton]—improper in a war, or in the case of a war to publish a state of accounts to all the world— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. In this speech H was discussing the following amendment: “That an Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of public Money shall at least once in every Year be transmitted to the Executives of the several States to be laid...
Ham[ilton]—this will increase appeals—but does not much oppose—[Samuel] Jones—this will seldom happen—& cannot last Ham[ilton]—it may opperate to the prejudice of the poor— Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. In this speech H was discussing the following proposed amendment to the Constitution: “That Congress shall not constitute ordain or establish any Tribunals...
Ham[ilton]—objects— because the Court ap[pointed] by Legislature Chan[cellor Robert R. Livingston]—these Judges or commisioners may be under the same influence as the Legislature themselves—therefore to be avoided. Ham[ilton]—of the same opinion. [Samuel] Jones—wishes security under these Courts—sees great inconveniency in having a Court totally independent—wishes some mode to remedy the evil—...
Ham[ilton]—wishes to know what objectn gent. have to Congss. arranging the militia. Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. H was discussing the following amendment concerning the militia: “That the power to organize arm and discipline the Militia shall only extend so far as to prescribe the Mode of officering arming & disciplining ⟨– – – – –⟩. (John McKesson Papers,...
Ham[ilton]—moves an amend[men]t that a court of trial of impeachments be constituted, prout—thinks this amend[men]t will obviate many of the objections against the senate. Gilbert Livingston MS Notes, MS Division, New York Public Library. This motion is not recorded in McKesson, “Journal of the Proceedings,” “Journal of the Proceedings of the Convention of the State of NewYork. Held at the...
That Mr. Hamilton Moved that the Clause last read should be expunged, and the following substituted in its Stead vizt: “That no Appropriation of Money in time of Peace for the Support of an Army shall be by Less than two thirds of the Representatives and Senators present.” John McKesson MS Notes, New-York Historical Society, New York City. The motion is printed in McKesson, “Journal of the...
Yours of yesterday is this instant come to hand & I have but a few minutes to answer it. I am sorry that your situation obliges you to listen to propositions of the nature you describe. My opinion is that a reservation of a right to withdraw if amendments be not decided on under the form of the Constitution within a certain time, is a conditional ratification, that it does not make N. York a...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours by the post. Yesterday I communicated to Duer our situation which I presume he will have communicated to you. It remains exactly the same, no further question having been taken. I fear the footing mentioned in my letter to Duer is the best upon which it can be placed; but every thing possible will yet be attempted to bring the party from that stand to an...
Ham[ilton]—the spirit of the 2d clause he agrees with —& will agree in—the jury of the vicinage in some cases cannot be good—however will not insist on it—a jury—is security sufficient—without saying of the County—moves to strike out “ of the county .” Govr [George Clinton]—wishes it should stand. [Samuel] Jones—do—who shall designate whence the jury should be called—the prosecutor may lay his...