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New York [ 1798–1804 ]. “A Series of misfortunes which have pursued me from infancy … make me apply to you for a Small Sum to relieve me from present embarrassment. The portrait that accompanies this letter is not offered to you in barter for the sum required. No Sir, it is my request that you would honor it with some corner in your house.… It is Sir the portrait of the Countess of Serang,...
[ New York, November, 1800. The description of this letter in the dealer’s catalogue reads: “deals with legal matters.” Letter not found. ] LS , sold by Goodspeed’s Bookstore, Boston, February, 1942. For background to this letter, see H, Cooper, and Ogden to FitzSimons, Herman LeRoy, William Tilghman, and Matthew Pearce, October 17, 1800, note 1 ; November 17, 1800 . FitzSimons, Higbee, and...
This is the fifth letter, Madam, that ⟨I shall⟩ have written to you, without yet having had ⟨the pleasure⟩ of knowing that one has reached your hands. This ⟨situation⟩ is matter of no small regret to us, and it would be still more perplexing and painful did we not understand th⟨at⟩ others of your friends are in a like situation. Being a common misfortune, we cannot impute it to any...
I am just arrived here after a very comfortable journey. Our intention is to reach Albany on Wednesday morning, from which place I shall immediately write to you. I am less and less pleased with the prospect of so long a separation from my beloved family & you may depend shall shorten it as much as possible. Dumphey had planted the Tulip Trees in a row along the outer fence of the Garden in...
Mr. Hamilton called at Major L’Enfant’s this Afternoon, with intent to communicate something interesting. He will be glad to see the Major, at his house, this Evening or tomorrow Morning. AL , Digges-L’Enfant-Morgan Collection, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to L’Enfant, July 27, 1801, note 2 ; L’Enfant to H, September 4, 1801 .
[ New York, 1801. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter reads: “in regard to the case of the Ringwood Iron Co.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by Goodspeed’s Book Store, Boston, Catalogue 101, Item 1643. Troup was the attorney for the trustees of the American Iron Company. For background to this letter, see the introductory note to Philip Schuyler to H, August 31, 1795 . See also H...
[ New York, February 26, 1801. On March 6, 1801, Hamilton wrote to Ingraham and acknowledged the receipt of “Your letter of the 26th of February.” Letter not found. ] Ingraham, a former ship captain from Massachusetts who had served on board the Bonhomme Richard in its famous encounter with the Serapis , was a New York City shipowner, merchant, and land speculator.
I have the honor to inform you, that at A meeting of the Society for the promotion of Agriculture Arts & Manufactures Held in the Senate Chamber on the 11th Feby 1801 You was duly elected a Member thereof. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. DeWitt, a graduate of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia in 1797, practiced medicine in Albany. After George Clinton became governor of New...
Your Sister Peggy has gradually grown worse & is now in a situation that her dissolution in the opinion of the Doctor is not likely to be long delayed. The Lt Governor sends the bearer to bring home his Child. I have not time to add more. Adieu My Eliza ALS , Mr. Andrew Joyner, Greensboro, North Carolina. H was in Albany attending the New York Court of Errors. See H to Elizabeth Hamilton,...
After my ill success hitherto, I ought perhaps in prudence to say nothing further on the subject. But situated as things now are I certainly have no advice to give. Yet I may without impropriety communicate a fact. It is this—Colonel Burr is taking an active personal part in favour of Mr Clinton against Mr Rensselaer as Governor of this State. I have upon my honor direct & indubitable evidence...
[ Albany, February 21, 1801. “I wrote to you my beloved from Poughkeepsie by post yesterday immediately on my arrival by Mr. Ephraim Hart of the tribe of Benjamin or Judah.… Mr. Burr, as a proof of his conversion to Federalism, has within a fortnight taken a very active and officious part against Renssalaer in favour of Clinton. Tell this to Mr. Church. And let me tell you what is of much more...
We have reached this place for the night, after a very tolerable journey. I am in much better health than Spirits. The swiss-malady grows upon me very fast—in other words I am more and more homesick. This added to some other circumstances that do not give me pleasure at the present moment makes me rather heavy hearted. But we must make the best of those ills which cannot be avoided. The...
As the period when Congress will rise is close at hand, and the opportunity of your saving us from ruin by a fair representation of facts must then, in all probability, cease, we take the liberty, with great respect, of praying your attention, to the Letter we address’d you some time since, and remain Your Most obedient & very humble servants. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. The...
At present I have not Leisure to mention more on the subject, than that the Gentleman who was thought of for a certain Employment, declines it—nor does he know of any Person who wd. probably be willing and also well qualified to execute what would be expected from him as necessary to ensure Success to the Plan. Yours ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. In JCHW John C. Hamilton, ed.,...
February 12, 1801. Acknowledges Hamilton’s letter of February 11, 1801 . Discusses several lawsuits involving the capture and resale of American-owned vessels by foreign nations and the settlement of the cases in United States courts. ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Letter not found. H wanted this information for the case of John C. Vandenheuvel v United Insurance Company , which...
[ New York, February 11, 1801. On February 12, 1801, Tilghman wrote to Hamilton : “Your Favor of Yesterday is before me.” Letter not found. ] Tilghman was a lawyer in Philadelphia.
I Have not, Since my Return to france, Received a Line from you—yet I am Sure you are affectionately interested in every Account Which Concerns me. The departure of Mr pichon for the United States affords me a Good Opportunity to write. He Has much pleased me by His eager wishes and Useful Exertions for a Reconciliation Between Both Countries. He Speaks of America and Americans in terms...
Yr. favor was duely recd & would have been replied to immediately, had not the subject it regards been so momentous & was I not solicitous to communicate my final decision to you thereupon. It is certainly cause of no little regret in my mind to find myself in opposition to you on any occurrence, especially on one so important as that which now presents itself. But really my friend after much...
A Burr 1   He is in every sense a profligate; a voluptuary in the extreme, with uncommon habits of expence; in his profession extortionate to a proverb; suspected on strong grounds of having corruptly served the views of the Holland Company, in the capacity of a member of our legislature He cooperated in obtaining a law to permit Aliens to hold & convey lands. ; and understood to have been...
Washington, January 27, 1801. Requests a certificate indicating that his son, Lieutenant John Glen, performed extra service on Hamilton’s orders. States that his son needs this certificate to obtain “his pay Rations & Extra Allowances.” Copy, Schenectady County Historical Society, Schenectady, New York. Glen, a Schenectady merchant, was a member of the Provincial Congress and a deputy...
I have now lying before me your Letter dated the instant. It contains important facts with many of which I had previously become acquainted but I dare not communicate the Contents because the Idea that two States will on a second Ballot come over forms already a Reason with the federal Members in the House of Representatives for supporting Mr Burr. They now seriously and generally after much...
Being in a hurry to leave New York for this place, I comprised in a letter to Bayard some observations which had I had time I should have put in a reply to your last. I requested him to communicate it to you & I beg you as you love your country, your friends and yourself to reconsider dispassionately the opinion you have expressed in favour of Burr. I never was so much mistaken as I shall be...
I intended to have reached Croton this Evening and would have done it without difficulty had not a very violent shower of Rain obliged me to stop at this place. If the storm subsides I hope to be at Albany on Wednesday. The roads are too bad for you to venture this part of the road in your carriage if you can possibly avoid it. The plan of going to Poughkepsie is best. Dont forget to visit the...
I was glad to find my dear sir, by your letter, that you had not yet determined to go with the current of the Fœderal Party in the support of Mr Burr & that you were resolved to hold yourself disengaged till the moment of final decision. Your resolution to separate yourself, in this instance, from the Fœderal Party if your conviction shall be strong of the unfitness of Mr Burr, is certainly...
I have yours of the 9th. I had already replied to those which it refers to. The Idea that a Division of the Votes would bring over the Aristocrats who call themselves Democrats to vote for Burr is unfounded. Were it otherwise a Number ⟨of⟩ Federalists , that is of Republicans would urge the Experiment and therefore the only Use I could make of your Letter was to communicate the Contents of it...
I this Instant receive your favor of the tenth. I thank you for it. The Aurora will have shewn you the Result of our Deliberations on the Convention at least of those which went to a Division worth noting. If it sticks in France it will be respecting Points on which the Vote was unanimous or nearly so. As to the Induction from the Words of the 2d Article that the old Treaties subsisted tho...
Pour ne Pas Laisser plus Long-temps Les fonds mort , destinés Pour L’establissement de Mlle. Hylton, a present Madame Le Guen, conformement á mon Contrat de mariage avec Elle, Et En attandant L’occasion favorable de les Placer deffinitivement avec avantage , J’ai trouvée, Par L’entremise de Mr. Prime ⟨–⟩, un Placement de, Dix Milles dollars á L’interest de 7. ⅌ . %. par án Jusquau 1er. avril...
I acknowledge to have received of Louis Le Guen in deposit for the purposes of his marriage contract and the surplus for his particular use Eighteen thousand Dollars in Cash a Bond of Aaron Burr conditioned for the payment of Six thousand seven hundred and thirty Dollars and thirteen Cents secured by the assignment of five leases and one mortgage in Fee also two notes of the said Aaron Burr...
I enclose the within power, confiding that the Trustees agree in an opinion, that no investment in real property, should be assented to, unless, in such, as would be productive to Mrs. Le Guien, in case of accident to her husband. If the power be not sufficiently ample, or in proper form, be pleased to cause such an one to be sent to me, as you may judge requisite & I will return it duly...
I hasten to give you some information which may be useful. I know as a fact that overtures have been made by leading individuals of the Fœderal party to Mr. Burr, who declines to give any assurances respecting his future intentions and conduct saying that to do it might injure him with his friends and prevent their cooperation—that all ought to be inferred from the necessity of his future...
I received your letter of the 4th inst on Saturday last. After giving as much consideration as I could to the subject of the election of a President, which I perceived from conversation with some of the members of Congress who were here at christmas was likely to assume a serious form, it appeared to me that the proper line for the federal party to pursue in the case, was, to acquiesce with a...
I thank you, My Dear Sir, for your letter of the 5 instant. The scruples you express about the ratification of the Convention are very respectable. No well informed man can doubt that it is an exceptionable instrument; but I continue of the opinion that it is best upon the whole to ratify it unconditionally. It does not appear to me that on fair construction the existence of the old treaties...
I yesterday had the honor of receiving your favor of the fourth instant, & am justly sensible of the distinction conferred upon me by your confidence. My determination to support Mr Burr has been shaken by your communication, & I shall make, among those who with you are anxious to preserve the public order at this crisis, all the use of it that its seasonableness & value will enable me to do....
I delayed my dear sir, an answer to your Letter of the 22nd ult. purposely, because from it I was induced to beleive I was soon to be favored with another containing additional observations on the convention. On that subject, at present, I shall say nothing. It is not doubted that the votes for Jefferson and Burr have been equally given, and that from one of those the House must select the...
I have received your favor of the 24th. Ult. It is probable a rejection of the French convention would excite some unpleasant feeling in America; But its Ratification would be Dishonorable. The Second and Third Articles were rejected by very large majorities. Genl. Armstrong voted against the Second Article, which alarmed the Jacobins. With Some other exceptions, it is believed, the thing will...
I have lately, My Dear Sir, written to you two letters. As they contained some delicate topics, I shall be glad to know that they got to hand. It has occurred to me that perhaps the Fœderalists may be disposed to play the game of preventing an election & leaving the Executive power in the hands of a future President of the Senate. This, if it could succeed, would be for obvious reasons a most...
I have been but a few days in this City, but since my arrival have had the pleasure to receive the letter which you did me the honor to write on the 27. Ult. I am fully sensible of the great importance of the Subject to which it relates and am therefore extremely obliged by the information you have been so obliging as to communicate. You have probably Seen a letter addressed by Col. Burr to...
I have received your favors of the 24th. and 26th of last Month. I am much oblig’d by both. The Convention with france will be ratified sub Modo . Such at least is my Opinion. I wish 1st to strike out the 2d & 3d Articles 2dly. to fix a Limitation of Time. The 2d Art. ⟨by⟩ suspending the Operation admits the Existence of former ⟨Tr⟩eaties. The Restitution of our Trophies stipulated by the 3d...
By yesterday’s post I received your letter of the 31 of December. I was just about to write to you on the principal subject of it. Nothing has given me so much chagrin as the Intelligence that the Fœderal party were thinking seriously of supporting Mr. Burr for President. I should consider the execution of the plan as devoting the country and signing their own death warrant. Mr. Burr will...
My extreme anxiety about the ensuing election of President by the House of Representatives will excuse to you the liberty I take in addressing you concerning it without being consulted by you. Did you know Mr. Burr as well as I do, I should think it unnecessary. With your honest attachment to the Country and correctness of views, it would not then be possible for you to hesitate, if you now do...
I receivd this morning your letter of the 26th of Decr. It is I believe certain that Jefferson & Burr will come to the house of representatives with equal votes. The returns have been all receivd & this is the general opinion. Being no longer in the house of representatives & consequently compeld by no duty to decide between them, my own mind had scarcely determind to which of these gentlemen...
Your kindness in taken me under your Paternage claims my warmest returns of Gratitude. let me beg that you Receive the thanks of that sincere heart, that never has, nor I hope never will be ungratefull. I believe in the worse of Time’s when Men Soul’s trembled at danger, when most was Alarm’d at a for boding Storm. a few, a Virtuous few Stood. I humbly trust I am one of them. remember that...
Rules for Mr Philip Hamilton from the first of April to the first of October he is to rise not later than Six Oclock—The rest of the year not later than Seven. If Earlier he will deserve commendation. Ten will be his hour of going to bed throughout the year. From the time he is dressed in the morning till nine o clock (the time for breakfast Excepted) he is to read Law. At nine he goes to the...
In announcing to you Mrs. Hamilton’s acceptance of your obliging present and conveying to you the acknowlegements which she charges me to make to you I abandon the reluctance which I might otherwise feel to my sensibility at a mark of your attention so delicately conveyed. The discharge of my professional duty towards you with all the zeal which the nature of the case demands has no ⟨claim...
The situation we are in, though not unexpected by a few, has filled the public with equal surprise and terror. The votes, Rhode Island excepted, have been given in a manner to take away that sort of reproach from the Hamiltonians that momentary interests and the petulance of disappointment wd. otherwise have naturally thrown upon us. I discern symptoms of general wish to pass an act of...
Your last letter, My Dear Sir, has given me great pain; not only because it informed me that the opinion in favour of Mr. Burr was increasing among the Fœderalists, but because it also told me that Mr. Sedgwick was one of its partizans. I have a letter from this Gentleman in which he expresses decidedly his preference of Mr. Jefferson. I hope you have been mistaken and that it is not possible...
I have recd. a letter from Mr. W. this morning in which he says. “I have made enquiry respecting the declaration of Mr. Adams while in London in Nov. 1783—it seems he thought negociations could be better conducted there than in a foreign country, and observes—‘Here with the most perfect politeness to ministers we may keep them in awe; a visit to a distinguished member of opposition, even...
Letters which myself and others have received from Washington give me much alarm at the prospect that Mr. Burr may be supported by the Fœderalists in preference to Mr. Jefferson. Be assured, my Dear Sir, that this would be a fatal mistake. From a thorough knowlege of the character I can pronounce with confidence that Mr. Burr is the last man in the UStates to be supported by the Fœderalists. 1...
Several letters to myself & others from the City of Washington, excite in my mind extreme alarm on the subject of the future President. It seems nearly ascertained that Jefferson & Burr will come into the house of Rs. with equal votes, and those letters express the probability that the Fœderal Party may prefer the latter. In my opinion a circumstance more ruinous to them, or more disastrous to...
Je Vous remet inclus La Lettre que Vous Ecrit Le Cel. Burr, par la quelle il doit Vous faire payer Pour Mon Compte—apres demoin Lemoy 29.— Dollars 6000.— Voicy Ensuitte La Maniere dont il doit regler Avec Moy. Apres avoir fixée avec Moy, ( des Onoraires Pour tous Ses Soins dans mes affaires Contre la maison Gouvr. et Kemble à Sa Satisfaction ) il s’est reconnue Mon d’Ebiteur de $—12539.41,...