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The Post of to day brought me your letter of yesterday, by which I perceive the care and diligence you have employed in constituting towards completing the Court Martial. The enclosed extract copy of an order of this date confirms your nomination of Judge Advocate. Be pleased to convey to him the letter herewith sent for him. The only persons of whom, I have information, that who will come...
Your letter of the twentieth instant on the subject of the duel between Lieutenant Sharp and Captain Johnston was not so particular as I could have wished it to have been. I am the more anxious to have an exact statement of this affair as it is represented in the papers to have been the consequence of a political dispute. This has attracted a particular attention to the subject. You will...
For particular reasons, I request you to send the inclosed letter to Captain Elliot by a mode of Conveyance which will ascertain its safe delivery to him in person I will also thank you to inform me of the Receipt of this letter and the delivery of the inclosure. With great consideration & esteem Yr Obed Servt. (Copy, in the handwriting of Philip Church, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
Confiding in the superiority of your loc al knowlege and in your disposition to promote the service equally in every relation—I approve the alterations you propose by Your Letter of the 22d. instant. You will make your arrangements accordingly and communicate what respects his Regiment to Col. Ogden. With great consideration &— P.S. Your Pay Master may immediately enter upon the Execution of...
I have received your letter of the seventeenth inst. and regret extremely the event of which it informs me. Whilst military prejudices must be respected on the one hand, I have no doubt that you are Alth’o it is not my intention to contravene military prejudices on the subject, of duellings, yet I doubt not you will agree with me that it is the duty of every commanding officer proper to...
I presume circumstances have intefered with my the execution of my desire as to the delivery of a letter some time since conveyed thro’ you to Capt. Elliott I leave the inclosed open for your perusal, that you may perceive the occasion of the request I shall now make which is, that you will send it by an Officer instructing him to inform Capt. Elliott that he waits for a reply—You will first...
It is afflicting to learn that Such a dispute as you state in your letter of the third instant should have occurred between two officers of the American army. Particular attachment to any foreign nation is an exotic sentiment which, where it exists, must derogate from the exclusive affection due to our own country. Partiality to France at this late date is a bad symptom. The profession of it...
New York, April 13, 1799. “Relying that you will lose no time in assigning your Officers to the different subdistricts—I request that you will transmit me a list, showing the name of the principal Officer of each sub-district and the particular sub-district to which he is assigned. You will also … forward a duplicate to the Secy of War.” ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For...
Your letters of July the seventeenth of August and the twenty fourth of July have been delivered to me. It is certainly of great importance that the practice of desertion should be suppressed, and I shall not fail to adopt such measures as may appear calculated to produce the effect as far as may depend upon me to pursue and promote effectual measures, for accomplishing that object. The...
By a letter of the Secy. of the Navy transmitted to me by the Secretary of War it appears that the Marine Corps at Norris-town is insufficient to guard the State Prisoners there. You will please to take measures that an adequate number of the Soldiers under your command be stationed there to complete the guard wanted. With great consideration I am Sir Yr. Obedt. Servt. ( LS , in the...
I thank you for your attention to my request in regard to Capt Elliot. I do not find among my papers any letter from you communicating the nomination of — Regimental staff. Your letter on that subject has mi scarried or has been mislaid. You will therefore communicate the nomination to the Secretary of War, informing him that it is done by my direction, and you will obtain from him a...
In reply to a former letter to you, I request that you will transmit the proceedings of the Court Martial which you mention to the Secy of War. With great considerat. I am Sir Yr Obed Ser ( ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress).
I am instructed by the President to express to you his wish that every practicable exertion may be made to accelerate the assembling of the Militia at their appointed places of Rendevous, Winchester and the Vincinity of old Fort Pleasant Alias Moorefield. You are probably informed that a junction of the Virginia and Maryland Troops at Fort Cumberland has been contemplated. You are at liberty...
His Excellency is sending a considerable detachment towards the enemy’s lines, which will march tomorrow morning. He desires you to select 50 men of your corps, under good officers, and send them to join that detachment. It will be at White marsh tomorrow afternoon where your party will be expected. A party of Indians will join the party to be sent from your corps, at White marsh and act with...
[ New York, November 18, 1788. On November 18, 1788, Hamilton wrote to George Washington : “I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to … General” Daniel Morgan. Letter not found. ]
Your three letters of the 21st of March, 6th and 10th of April have been received, and gave me great pleasure. I accept your challenge to meet you in the field of mutual confidential communication; though I cannot always promise punctuality, or copiousness. I will however do the best I can. Will it not be a necessary preliminary to agree upon a Cypher? One has been devised for me, which though...
I this moment received the favour of your letter of the 16th instant. I partly agree and partly disagree with you respecting the deficiencies of your constitution. That there is a want of vigor in the executive, I believe will be found true. To determine the qualifications proper for the chief executive Magistrate requires the deliberate wisdom of a select assembly, and cannot be safely lodged...
I thank you, My Dear Sir, for your letter of the 5 instant. The scruples you express about the ratification of the Convention are very respectable. No well informed man can doubt that it is an exceptionable instrument; but I continue of the opinion that it is best upon the whole to ratify it unconditionally. It does not appear to me that on fair construction the existence of the old treaties...
Agreeable to the intention of the Council I have delivered their inclosed letter to His Excellency who after perusing it has sealed and forwarded it to Mr. Hancock. The relieving Fort Schuyler is a very happy and important event, and will concur with the two happy strokes given by Harkemar and Stark to reverse the face of affairs and turn the scale against Mr Burgoigne. I hope Capt...
Permit me to introduce to Your acquaintance and attention Mr Seaton Cashier of the Bank of New York. He is just setting out for Philadelphia to procure materials, and information in the forms of business. I recommend him to you, because I am persuaded you will with pleasure facilitate his object. Personally I dare say you will be pleased with him. He will tell you of our embarrassments and...
I hasten to give you some information which may be useful. I know as a fact that overtures have been made by leading individuals of the Fœderal party to Mr. Burr, who declines to give any assurances respecting his future intentions and conduct saying that to do it might injure him with his friends and prevent their cooperation—that all ought to be inferred from the necessity of his future...
Pardon me My Dr. Sir for not sooner having obeyed your orders with respect to the inclosed. I part with it reluctantly; for that is so rare an article, that when we get so much of it in so small a compass we can not easily consent to be dispossessed of it. I am very happy to hear of the union of your two banks; for you will believe me when I tell you, that on more deliberate consideration, I...
I received your favour of the 4th, by express. If I recollect how far my last went, it did not announce the return of the enemy from Westfield to Amboy, nor their evacuation of that place since. After resting and refreshing themselves a night, they decamped the following day and proceeded to Amboy from which place they went to Staten Island as expeditiously as they could; where they still...
I fully intended to have dined with you to day but going to Town the two last days & forgetting that I ought to observe a regimen, I have brought back in some degree the complaint which lately annoyed me & which requires to be well watched. This must deprive me of the pleasure of seeing you. I send Schedules of the papers required of Tillier, all which have been put into my hands—the bill to...
[ New York, May 7–11, 1804. On May 7–11, 1804, H wrote to Elizabeth Hamilton : “… if Morris will come. Send him the enclosed note.” Letter not found. ]
I acknowlege my delinquency in not thanking you before for your obliging letter from Richmond. But the truth is that I have been so overwhelmed in avocations of one kind or another that I have scarcely had a moment to spare to a friend. You I trust will be the less disposed to be inexorable, as I hope you believe there is no one for whom I have more inclination than yourself—I mean of the male...
I duly received my dear Sir your letter of the 27th: of January and I would have sooner told you how much pleasure it gave me, if I had had time; but legislative folly has afforded so plentiful a harvest to us lawyers that we have scarcely a moment to spare from the substantial business of reaping. Today being sunday I have resolved to give an hour to friendship and to you. Good people would...
Your letter of the 22d is the third favour for which I am indebted to you since you left N York. Your frankness in giving me your opinion as to the expediency of an application of our bar to Congress obliges me. But you know we are not readily persuaded to think we have been wrong. Were the matter to be done over I should pursue the same course. I did not believe the measure would be useful as...
You have seen certain resolutions unanimously pass our legislature for amending the Constitution 1 by designating separately the candidates for President and Vice President 2 by having the Electors chosen by the people in districts under the direction of the National Legislature. After mature reflection I was thoroughly confirmed in my first impression, that it is true Fœderal policy to...
I have lately, My Dear Sir, written to you two letters. As they contained some delicate topics, I shall be glad to know that they got to hand. It has occurred to me that perhaps the Fœderalists may be disposed to play the game of preventing an election & leaving the Executive power in the hands of a future President of the Senate. This, if it could succeed, would be for obvious reasons a most...
I have received the pleasure of your favour of yesterday’s date. The reasons you assign for the interval of silence on your part are admitted as sufficient; though I regret that the principal one exists—the combination of the tories for a general insurrection. But perhaps on the scale of policy I ought rather to congratulate you on the event: That there are too many tories in your state as...
[ Philadelphia, July 25, 1793. On October 17, 1793, Morris wrote to Hamilton and acknowledged the receipt of “yours of the 25th. of July.” Letter not found. ]
It was my intention to have come to see you this afternoon, among other things to confer about the affair of the loan. But the uncertain state of the weather & some bodily indisposition prevent me. As to the security for the loan: I hold it to be the better opinion that no foreigner can be in any form a cestuy que trust of land—that consequently no conveyance directly for the security of the...
The Legislature at their last Session having made provision for the paying off the Debt due to foreign Officers, the Interest of which is payable at the house of Mr. Grand, Banker, at Paris; and the President having authorized me to carry that provision into effect, I have concluded to commit such part of the business as is to be transacted at Paris to your Management; not doubting of the...
I will run the risk with you of giving countenance to a charge lately brought against me, though it has certainly had a very false direction—I mean that of being fond of giving advice. Several friends at Washington inform me, that there is likely to be much hesitation in the Senate about ratifying the Convention with France. I do not wonder at it, and yet I should be sorry that it should...
The post of yesterday gave me the pleasure of a letter from you. I thank you for the communication. I trust that a letter which I wrote you the day before the receipt of yours will have duly reached you as it contains some very free & confidential observations ending in two results—1 That The Convention with France ought to be ratified as the least of two evils 2 That on the same ground...
Your favour of the 18th ⟨from Saratoga reached me⟩ yesterday. Your pronouncing Fort Edward among the other forts indefensible surprises me a little, as it is intirely contrary to the representations of several Gentlemen of judgment, who have had an opportunity of seeing and considering its situation, by whom we have been taught to believe, that it would be an excellent post, at least ⟨for⟩...
[ Philadelphia, May 28, 1793. Hamilton endorsed a letter of May 20, 1793 , from Morris: “Ansd. May 28.” Letter not found. ]
[ Philadelphia, March 24, 1792 . On April 13, 1792, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “Your favour of the 24th. Ulto. is duly Recd.” Letter not found .] Morris had been appointed supervisor of the revenue for the District of New York on March 8, 1792.
New York, September 8, 1788. Petition by the administrators of Philip Livingston’s estate to Morris, Chief Justice of the State of New York, to examine and to settle a claim made by Livingston’s estate against the estate of Philip Skene, a Tory whose lands had been confiscated by New York State. DS , Columbia University Libraries. This document is listed as a “document not found” in PAH Harold...
[ New York, September 8, 1788. Sends a petition to “The Honorable Richard Morris, Esq., Chief Justice of the State of New York on behalf of the estate of Philip Livingston.” Document not found. ] DS , sold at Parke-Bernet Galleries, April 4, 1939, Lot 241 . ; DS , Columbia University Libraries. This document is printed in Goebel, Law Practice , I, 257-58.
[ Philadelphia, May 8, 1793. On May 20, 1793, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “I am favoured with your letter of the 8th. instant.” Letter not found. ] Morris had been supervisor of the revenue for the District of New York until April, 1793.
I have the honor to acknowlege the receipt of your letter of the 29th. of August; the contents of which shall be executed. I have just received by the post accounts of the specific supplies furnished by this state; copies of which I shall prepare to be transmitted to you by the next post, as I am to return the Originals, which are for the inspection of the legislature. I hope to add to these...
I have been honord this week with your letters of the 28 August 6th. 12th and 17th instant with their inclosures. It gives me the most real pleasure to find that my past communications have meet your approbation; and I feel a particular satisfaction in the friendly confidence which your letters manifest. I am persuaded that substanial reasons have determined your choice in a particular...
[ New York, October 5, 1797. On October 27, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton and referred to “your last letter dated the 5th inst.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, August 3, 1782. On the back of a letter which Robert Morris wrote to H on July 22, 1782 , H wrote: “Ansd. Aug 3d.” Letter not found. ]
In my last I informed you that the Committee appointed by the Legislature on the subject of taxation were together. In spite of my efforts, they have parted without doing any thing decisive. They have indeed agreed upon several matters and those of importance but they have not reduced them to the form of a report, which in fact leave every thing afloat to be governed by the impressions of the...
[ New York, November 10, 1796. On November 19, 1796, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “I … find your letter of the 10 Inst.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, May 4, 1782. On May 20, 1782, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “I have received your Letter of the fourth Instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, October 19, 1782. On October 28, 1782 , Morris wrote to Hamilton: “I have received your Favor dated at Albany on the 19th Instant with the Enclosures.” Letter not found. ]