You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Hamilton, Alexander
  • Recipient

    • Washington, George
  • Project

    • Hamilton Papers

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
Results 451-494 of 494 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 10
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
The sitting of the Court and an uncommon pressure of business have unavoidably delayed an answer to your last favour. I have read with attention Mr. Pickerings letter. It is in the main a substantial and satisfactory paper, will in all probability do considerable good in enlightening public opinion at home—and I do not know that it contains any thing which will do harm elsewhere. It wants...
My late situation exposes me to applications which I cannot resist without appearing unkind. It is understood that Mr. Walker is about to resign the place of naval Officer. Mr. Jonathan Burrall Mr. Rogers (Walker’s Deputy) and Col Giles (the present Marshall) have all three mentioned the subject to me and requested me to express my opinion of their qualifications to you. As to Mr. Burrall...
The receipt two days since of your letter of the 21 instant gave me sincere pleasure. The token of your regard, which it announces, is very precious to me, and will always be rememberd as it ought to be. Mrs. Hamilton has lately added another boy to our Stock. She and the Child are both well. She desires to be affectionately remembered to Mrs. Washington & yourself. We have nothing new here...
At the present dangerous crisis of public affairs, I make no apology for troubling you with a political letter. Your impressions of our situation, I am persuaded, are not different from mine. There is certainly great probability that we may have to enter into a very serious struggle with France; and it is more and more evident that the powerful faction which has for years opposed the...
I have before me your favour of the 27. of May. The suggestion in my last was an indigested thought begotten by my anxiety. I have no doubt that your view of it is accurate & well founded. It is a great satisfaction to me to ascertain what I had anticipated in hope, that you are not determined in an adequate emergency against affording once more your Military services. There is no one but...
I was much surprized on my arrival here to discover that your nomination had been without any previous consultation of you. Convinced of the goodness of the motives it would be useless to scan the propriety of the step. It is taken and the question is—what under the circumstances ought to be done? I use the liberty which my attachment to you and to the public authorises to offer my opinion...
[ Philadelphia, July 28, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Your letter of the 14th instant did not reach me ’till after the appointments mentioned in it were made. I see clearly in what has been done a new mark of your confidence, which I value as I ought to do. With regard to the delicate subject of the relative rank of the Major Generals, it is very natural for me to be partial judge, and it is not very easy for me to speak upon it. If I know myself...
A necessary absence from this City prevented the receipt of your letter of the 9th instant till yesterday. It is very grateful to me to discover in each succeeding occurrence a new mark of your friendship towards me. Time will evince that it makes the impression it ought on my mind. The effect which the course of the late military appointments has produced on General Knox though not very...
Your obliging favour of the 24th instant has duly come to hand. I see in it a new proof of sentiments towards me which are truly gratifying. But permit me to add my request to the suggestion of your own prudence, that no personal considerations for me may induce more on your part than on mature reflection you may think due to public motives. It is extremely foreign to my wish to create to you...
Some ill health in my family, now at an end as I hope, interfered with an earlier acknowlegement of your favour of the 21st instant. The contents cannot but be gratifying to me. It is my intention, if not prevented by further ill health in my family, to proceed on the first of November to Trenton. My aid to the Secretary to the full extent of what he shall permit me to afford will not be...
General Hamilton presents his respects to the Commander in Chief & sends the sketch of a letter in conformity to what passed this morning.
The Secretary at War has communicated to me the following disposition with regard to the superintendence of our Military forces and Posts. All those in States South of Maryland in Tennessee and Kentucke are placed under the Direction of Major General Pinckney: those every where else under my direction—to which he has added the general care of the Recruiting service. The commencement of the...
Different reasons have conspired to prevent my writing to you since my return to New York —the multiplicity of my avocations, an imperfect state of health and the want of something material to communicate. The official letter herewith transmitted will inform you of the disposition of our military affairs which has been recently adopted by the Department of War. There shall be no want of...
Unwilling to take the liberty to ask you to give yourself any particular trouble on the subject I have written the enclosed letters. I beg you to dispose of them as you suppose will best answer the end in view—that is to obtain a speedy distribution of the State into Districts and sub-districts. With the truest attachment   I have the honor to be My Dear Sir   Your obed servant ALS , George...
I have the honor to send you the extract of a letter of the 8th instant (received two days since) from the Secretary of War, together with the Section of the Act to which it relates. I am entirely of opinion with him, as to the expediency of causing the Pay Master General to reside at the seat of Government. But as the measure is of importance, and especially as the act expressly refers the...
[New York, March 14, 1799. Second letter of March 14 not found.] In the “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries, two letters from H are listed for March 14, 1799.
At length we are on the point of commencing the recruiting service in five of the States, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania & Delaware. It is hoped, that it will not be long in successively embracing the others, where officers have been appointed. But in our affairs ’till a thing is actually begun, there is no calculating the delays which may ensue. You have been informed that the...
Agreeably to your letter of the 25th of March, which with its inclosures have come duly to hand, I have written to the Pay Master General to repair to the Seat of Government. Your letter to Col Hamtranck goes by the same opportunity. The arrangements for beginning to recruit in the States of Connecticut, New York, Jersey, Pensylvania and Delaware, are so mature that it will be very...
New York, April 17, 1799. “I have the honor of your letter of the 10th. instant.… The alterations you suggest are adopted.…” LS , in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; copy, in the handwriting of Ethan Brown, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress.
At length the recruiting for the additional regiments has begun in Connecticut New York New Jersey Pensylvania and Delaware . The enclosed return of cloathing will sufficiently explain to you that it has commenced at least as soon as the preparations by the Department of War would permit. It might now also proceed in Maryland and Massachusettes, and the next post will I trust enable me to add...
I did myself the honor to write to you at some length on the 3 of May. I hope the letter got safe to hand. The recruiting service is now in motion, in Maryland, Delaware Pensylvania New Jersey, New York, Connecticut and Massachusettes. I might perhaps add Virginia, from the assurances which I have received as to the transmission of supplies. But I am not as yet informed of its actual...
I wrote to you a few days since chiefly to inform you of the progress of the measures respecting the recruiting service & that the symptoms with regard to it were sufficiently promising. The accounts continue favourable. I have just received a letter from General Wilkinson dated the 13 of April, in which he assures me that he will set out in the ensuing month for the seat of Government. The...
I was yesterday honored with your letter of the 14th. instant. The recommendations of Captains Taylor and Blue will not fail to be considered when the situation of things is mature for the appointment of Brigade Inspectors. Inclosed you will find a general abstract of the recruiting Returns, which at its date were received at the Office of the Adjutant General. Other Information induces me to...
Two days since, I received from General Wilkinson a Report of which I now send you the original. You will find it intelligent and interesting. Perhaps on the score of intrinsic propriety it deserves to be adopted to a larger extent than some collateral and extraneous considerations may permit. I had previously thought of the subject but had purposely limited myself to a few very general ideas,...
I had the pleasure of receiving in due time your letter of the 15th. instant. The suggestions it contains will be maturely weighed. I postpone any thing definitive, till the return of General Wilkinson which is momently expected. The other Documents, besides No. 8, which accompanied this letter, were not material to the consideration of its contents, or they would have been forwarded. Even...
On my return from Trenton, the day before yesterday, I found your private letter of the 13th. as well as yr. public letter of the 15th. instant. The News papers have probably informed you that poor Avery is dead of yellow fever. The President has resolved to send the commissioners to France notwithstanding the change of affairs there. He is not understood to have consulted either of his...
I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt two days since of your letter of the 15th. instant, at which time I also received one from Col: Parker, informing me of the selection of ground which he had made. You will see by the enclosed letter to him the impression which his communication has made on my mind. I trust that it must be erroneous, since my supposition does not agree with the spirit...
I have been duly honored with your letters of the 26th. and 27th. of October. General Pinckney happening to be at my house when they were received, I communicated them to him, together with such other letters as had come to hand relating to the same subject —and I have since furnished him with the subsequent information transmitted to me, in order that he might take the proper measures in...
[ New York, November 19, 1799. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Enclosed is a copy of a letter which I have written to the Secretary of War on the subject of a military Academy. Two reasons have prevented me from communicating it to you at an earlier day. My avocations rendered it imposible for me to complete the letter till very lately, and I had had opportunities of knowing your opinion on the subject generally. Any alterations in the plan which you may...
[ New Windsor, New York, November 12, 1777. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries. Two letters from H to Washington on November 12, 1777, are listed. One of these letters is printed in PAH Harold C. Syrett, ed., The Papers of Alexander Hamilton (New York and London, 1961– ). , I, 360–62.
[ Hopewell, New Jersey, June 23, 1778. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
Plan of exchange for the Troops of Convention, in three Divisions to be formed as equally, as the exchanging by Corps will allow, from the Strength of the Rank & file, each of the two first Divisions to have a Major General and a Brigadier General, and the third The Lieutenant General and a Brigadier General exchanged with them. The Regiments to which the Brigadier Generals belong to be...
[ Philadelphia, February 24, 1783. The description of this letter reads: “Referring to a plan for carrying the 8th article of the confederation into execution, etc.” Letter not found. ] Luther S. Livingston, ed., American Book-Prices Current (New York, 1906), 717. See the first and second “Continental Congress. Motion on Evaluation of State Lands for Carrying into Effect Article 8 of the...
[ Philadelphia, March 17, 1783. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries. Two letters from H to Washington on March 17, 1783, are listed. One letter is printed in PAH Harold C. Syrett, ed., The Papers of Alexander Hamilton (New York and London, 1961– ). , III, 290–93.
I have made the inquiry of General Schuyler which you directed. He says that he thinks Kirkland’s fidelity may be relied on; but does not entertain a very favourable opinion of his judgment or veracity. He says also that there is a Mr James Deane at Onieda who is a man of more discernment discretion and integrity, and who may probably be got here in twelve days. I shall make the inquiry you...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the United States and sends him the Draft of a power concerning the intended Loans. If any thing more particular should occur to the President it may be the subject of a distinct instruction. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For information concerning this document, see Tobias Lear to H, August 26, 1790...
[ Philadelphia, May 5, 1792. The calendar description of this letter reads: “Enclosing Application of Thomas Mendenhall for position of Assay Master of the Mint.” Letter not found. ] RG 104, Preliminary Inventory of the Records of the Bureau of the Mint, National Archives. From September 9 to December 18, 1790, Mendenhall had been superintendent of a paper mill in Chester County, Pennsylvania,...
I have already written to you to go by the Post. This is barely to inform you, that I have made the communication you desired to Mr. Kean, who promises every possible exertion—and that Mr. Langdon has been here about a fortnight. With perfect respect & attachment I have the honor to be   Sir   Your obedient servant P.S I have made progress in certain answers; but shall scarcely be ready to...
[ Philadelphia, April 9, 1794. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
[ Philadelphia, April 27, 1794. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
[ Philadelphia, May 21, 1794. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
I find that I omitted m in my official reply to avail say any thing on the subject of Major Campbell. On the appointments of this kind for the Troops South of Potowmack it is my intention particularly to consult General Pinckney with the advantage of the observations he shall make on the spot. But I do not publish this lest I should subject the General to embarrassment & ill will. Very Affect...