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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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The Secy. of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the U.S. & encloses herewith a draft of a passport, requested by mr Hammond for a vessel intended by him to be dispatched to Halifax, and which the Secretary understood from the Secy. of State was to be granted by the President. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Edmund Randolph to H, April 16, 1794 .
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. The enclosed permit has been prepared on the intimation of the Secretary of State, for the Spanish Commissioners. The Secretary is not informed whether the doubt on the subject of mr Hammond’s application was removed. The return of the enclosed will be considered as the evidence that it was. LC , George Washington Papers,...
[ Philadelphia ] April 19, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury … encloses herewith the draft of a passport for the Sloop Dove, for the President’s signature.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. On April 19, 1794, Washington “signed a passport for the Sloop Dove, Capt. Friend Dale, to proceed from Newbury port in ballast, to any of the West India Islands” ( JPP “Journal of...
I have received a letter of this date from Mr. Dandridge transmitting me two letters to you, one from Governor Mifflin, the other from John Wanton, and desiring that if any measures should be necessary to be taken relative to them, they should be reported to you. With regard to the communication from Govr. Mifflin, the subject of it will be put in a train of examination and the result will be...
I lately communicated to you a letter from our Commissioners at Amsterdam announcing the undertaking of a Loan on account of the U. States for three millions of Florins. I submit the following application of that loan as the one which appears to me most conducive to the good of the public service. One million of Florins to be appropriated to the payment of an instalment of an equal sum of the...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to The President. In compliance with the desire expressed by him, Mr. H has made a memorandum of certain points for consideration in preparing instructions for Mr. Jay, which are herewith sent. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For information on John Jay’s appointment as special envoy to Great Britain, see the introductory note to H to...
[ Philadelphia, April 23, 1794 ] “The Secretary of the Treasury … has the honor to transmit sundry drafts of passports in cases which have been handed to him for that purpose by the Secretary of State.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Edmund Randolph to H, April 19, 1794 .
When I wrote my letter of the 21st instant I had intirely forgotten the existence of your two instructions of the 8 of Augt., owing probably to the effect upon my memory of my sickness which soon after ensued. I only recollected that the loan had been authorised by me pursuant to your special direction, and I conceived that the subject of it’s disposition was wholly open. I regret this...
I beg leave by way of explanation to submit the grounds of my opinion, that the President may vary his instructions of the 8th of August last in reference to the application of the last loan obtained in Holland. A summary of the preceding transactions will serve to throw light upon the subject. The President by his Commission of the 28 of August 1790, gave full power to the Secretary of the...
[ Philadelphia ] April 25, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President & sends a letter to him from Captn. Cochran.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. This letter has not been found. It may have been from Robert Cochran, captain of the South Carolina revenue cutter.
[ Philadelphia ] April 25, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury … encloses the drafts of two passports for the President’s signature. One for the Schooner Commerce, now in this port; and the other for the Schooner Eagle at Baltimore. Colo. Smith of Baltimore has applied, thro’ the Secry. of State, for a passport for a small vessel (name & Captain not known) to be sent to Bermuda in ballast.…”...
[ Philadelphia ] April 25, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury … has the honor to transmit a Memorial from Colo. Weissenfelt, which came enclosed to him.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Frederick Weissenfels of New York had been a colonel during the American Revolution. In an earlier memorial and letter to Washington, Weissenfels had requested an appointment in the...
[ Philadelphia ] April 26, 1794 . Encloses “the draft of a passport for the American sloop Eliza, now in this port, bound for St. Domingo with passengers, for the President’s signature.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, second letter of April 25, 1794, note 2 .
I should not advise a present reference to the Legislature on the subject of the application of the loan; as under the circumstances of that body at this moment much debate would probably ensue and perhaps no decision. I am the less induced to advise this step; as the expedient itself will be hereafter practicable, if it shall appear to be necessary. It will be some time before the proceeds of...
[ Philadelphia ] April 29, 1794 . “The Secretary of the Treasury … encloses the draft of a passport for a schooner called the Eliza of New York, for the President’s signature. The application which accompanies it, comes from a number of French Emigrants now in New York.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ Philadelphia ] April 30, 1794 . Encloses “the draft of a passport for the President’s signature intended for the Ship Hope, now at Charleston.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Inclosed I have the honor to send you the translation of a letter from Mr. Fauchet, of the 21st instant. The arrangements of the Treasury have been taken so as to correspond with the epochs of promised payment. But I entertain no doubt that I can facilitate an arrangement between the Bank & Mr. Fauchet which will accomplish in substance the object of his letter. I did not think it proper,...
I have the honor to send herewith drafts of sundry passports for vessels to go with passengers to St. Domingo; but I begin to suspect that this is, or may be made a cover for carrying on mercantile speculations contrary to the true spirit of the Embargo, & in a manner liable to great inconveniency. It is easy to see that specie to a vast amount may be sent in such vessels to purchase West...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor of enclosing herewith the draft of a Passport for the President’s signature intended for the brigantine Lily, now at Baltimore. The case was here before the Secretary’s letter of yesterday was sent to the President, and was overlooked. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to George Washington, May 1, 1794 ; H to Otho H. Williams,...
Inclosed are copies of a Letter of mine of the 25 ultimo to the Attorney General and of his answer. Concurring entirely in opinion with that officer, I am led to bring the subject under the eye of the President only from the reflection that a foreign Government is concerned in the question and unless I receive a direction to the contrary, I shall act in conformity with that opinion. I am urged...
Treasury Department, May 3, 1794. Encloses “a letter from the Commissioner of the Revenue of the 30th of April, with his opinion that it is adviseable to confirm the purchase of Oil to which it relates.” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Tench Coxe to H, April 30, 1794 . Washington approved this purchase on May 3, 1794 ( JPP “Journal of the Proceedings of the President,”...
It appears to be the desire of the writers of the enclosed Letter, that it should be laid before you, for your direction, which I accordingly do. I think the Embargo will operate upon the case, notwithstanding the ultimate destination of the vessel. With perfect respect &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The enclosed letter was probably that of Reed and Forde to H, April...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to The President. Mr. Talleyrand De Perigord formerly Bishop D’Autun, who the President is probably informed, lately arrived here informs Mr. Hamilton that he has a letter of Introduction to The President from Lord Landsdown and asks how & when he can present it. Mr. Hamilton promised him to enquire to day—but on account of the President’s deafness this...
The enclosed letter from Mr. Hammond of the 6th instant was transmitted to me by the Secretary of State with a request that after satisfying myself of the step proper to be taken, I would communicate it to you & notify your determination to Mr. Hammond. The copy herewith sent of a letter from Mr. Rawle, exhibits the facts, which appear in the case; and reasoning from them, the conclusion is,...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President & sends the enclosed for his decision —submitting his opinion that it is not adviseable to grant the permission requested. This case is not precisely within the rule already adopted as a general one. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The enclosure was a letter which Jean Antoine Joseph Fauchet wrote to...
Treasury Department, May 15, 1794. Transmits “for the President’s signature, the draft of a passport upon application from the French Minister.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See Edmund Randolph to H, May 15, 1794 .
I some time since communicated an intention to withdraw from the office I hold, towards the close of the present session. This I should now put in execution, but for the events, which have lately accumulated, of a nature to render the prospect of the continuance of our peace in a considerable degree precarious. I do not perceive, that I could voluntarily quit my post at such a juncture,...
In answer to the enquiry you have been pleased to make, I have the honor to inform you that nothing has been yet done upon the first section of the Act of the 20th of March last, which appropriates a million of dollars, to defray any expenses that may be incurred in relation to the intercourse between the United States and foreign nations; authorising the President if necessary to borrow the...
I have the honor to reply to your Letter of the 29th. of May, on the subject of the million of dollars granted by the Act of the 20 of March last. As a day or two must determine the question of the fund, and will probably produce the requisite disposition concerning it—measures may be taken provisionally on that supposition. I therefore send here with the draft of a power for making the loan...
Upon receipt of the communication to you from the Governor of Pennsylvania of the 18 of April last, I put that letter and the papers attending it into the hands of the Commissioner of the Revenue to examine into the suggestions made & report to me concerning them. The result is contained in a letter from that Officer dated the 25 of April, (which hurry of business put out of sight) and which...
I have the honor to send here with sundry papers which relate to the Petition of William Martin & contain full information on the subject. Upon the whole as Mr. Martin is undoubtedly an innocent sufferer, I incline to the opinion that a pardon may be adviseable which would operate to remit one half the penalty incurred. With perfect respect &c. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of...
I have the honor of submitting herewith to the President the draft of a power to borrow One million of dollars, by virtue of the Act passed the 9 instant, intitled “an Act making appropriations for certain purposes therein expressed.” I need only observe, as to the necessity of making the loan, that the objects for which the Act provides will call for immediate expenditures and that the funds...
Treasury Department, June 11, 1794. “The second instalment on the loan of two millions of Dollars, made of the Bank of the United States, having become due in the month of December last, I have the honor to request that you will be pleased to authorise me, to carry into effect an Act of Congress passed this Session, entitled, ‘an Act providing for the payment of the second instalment due on a...
Treasury Department, June 11, 1794 “I have the honor to communicate a letter of the 19 of May from the Collector of Charleston with it’s enclosures—which announce a very exceptionable & dangerous interference, by certain Citizens of that place, with the Government, Treaties, and lawful authorities of the UStates.…” LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. The letter from Isaac...
Treasury Department, June 11, 1794. “The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits to the consideration of the President the enclosed communication from the Commissioner of the Revenue respecting two mooring chains for the river Delaware, with his opinion that it will be for the public interest to ratify it. The draft of an authorisation for paying the second instalment of the two million...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. He had thought that the appointment of a Supervisor for Pennsylvania might without inconvenience be deferred ’till the return of the President, & therefore deferred mentioning it. But on more particular reflection as a new revenue year commences with the first of July, he believes it would be of use to accelerate the...
It is with regret, I inform you, that another Collector has suffered Treasury drafts to return unpaid, which were drawn upon monies reported by him to be in his hands. Abraham Archer Esquire of York town. Inclosed are letters of apology on the subject. All the drafts which were at first declined were afterwards paid. I perceive nothing substantially to distinguish this case from that of the...
The Secretary of State in referring to you the question of the answer to be given to Mr. Hammond concerning compensation for certain captured vessels will I presume transmit to you the opinions of the other Gentlemen as well as his own. Besides the reasons hastily sketched in the memorandums given to the Secretary of State—there is one of a delicate nature which I did not think fit to put on a...
The inclosed Letter from the Collector of Hampton, of the 26th. of May, shews that the necessity of appointing a successor to that Officer has at length become absolute, & suggests some names for consideration. Another letter from mr Carrington of 19th. of December last suggests another name. The enquiry was made of Mr. Carington with your permission, but with cautious guards against...
From communications with the Secretary of State, in your absence, it would appear expedient to place the powers in Holland for making a Loan for the purpose of the Algierine negotiation earlier than may be practicable, if the Minister Resident there is to be the agent. Under this view of the subject, I request your instruction whether the power shall be sent to our Commissioners at Amsterdam...
Treasury Department, July 10, 1794. “The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully submits to the President of the UStates a Communication from the Commissioner of The Revenue of yesterday, transmitting a provisional contract for oil for the use of the Light houses with his opinion that a ratification of the contract will consist with the interest of the United States.” LC , George Washington...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President. The state of health of his little boy & the situation of Mrs Hamilton in consequence of it, oblige him to request the President to excuse him from attending the interview with the Indians today & also to ask the President’s permission to make an excursion into the country for a few days to try the effect of exercise & change...
I have considered the two subjects upon which you desired my opinion as maturely as my situation has permitted. With regard to the proceedings in Kentuke, I perceive nothing that can with propriety or utility be done; unless the Attorney General on full and careful examination should be of opinion that they furnish indictable matter, in which case I should think it very material that...
When I left Philadelphia I did not doubt that a week would be the extent of my absence. But circumstances have unavoidably delayed me beyond that time, & at this moment I am under a necessity of embarking to accompany Mrs Hamilton on her way to Albany as far as Fish Kill, where I shall land & repair to Philadelphia. I hope & believe that no material inconvenience will attend my absence—& when...
In compliance with your requisition I have the honor to submit my Opinion as to the course which it will be adviseable for the President to pursue in regard to the armed Opposition recently given in the four Western Counties of Pennsylvania to the execution of the laws of the U. States laying duties upon Spirits distilled within the United States and upon Stills. The case upon which an Opinion...
The draft of a proclamation and that of an instruction to the Commissioners being both prepared, we take the liberty to suggest that we think a meeting tomorrow morning at such hour as may be convenient to the President, may be adviseable. The Secretary of State & Attorney General being out of town we cannot consult them, but we will engage the attendance of the Attorney General provisionally...
The disagreeable crisis at which matters have lately arrived in some of the Western counties of Pensylvania, with regard to the laws laying duties on spirits distilled within the UStates and on Stills, seems to render proper a review of the circumstances which have attended those laws in that scene, from their commencement to the present time and of the conduct which has hitherto been observed...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President, sends him the statement of facts promised. The date is proposed to be two or three days before the Proclamation, when it was in fact begun. There is a blank to be filled with a quotation from a former proclamation which is not immediately at hand; but the blank will be filled before it goes to the press. If the President...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President & sends him two letters which were received last night from Pittsburgh. Would it not be adviseable to put the Garrison of Fort Franklin in the power of Major Butler, so that if he deems it advisable he may draw a part of it to his aid? An attack from the Indians appears at present improbable, & an attack from the Insurgents...
The Attorney for the District of Virginia has presented to the accounting officers of the Treasury Department, a claim against the United States for his services in attending at Norfolk by direction from the Secy. of State, in order to take depositions respecting a british vessel alledged to have been taken by a french privateer within the limits of the United States; which claim has been...