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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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Agreeably to the intimation heretofore given I have the honor now to tender you my resignation of the office of Secretary of the Treasury and to be With sincere respect and affectionate attachment   Sir   Your most Obedient & humble servant ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, December 1, 1794 , January 30, 1795 .
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
My particular acknowlegements are due for your very kind letter of yesterday. As often as I may recall the vexations I have endured, your approbation will be a great and precious consolation. It was not without a struggle, that I yielded to the very urgent motives, which impelled me to relinquish a station, in which I could hope to be in any degree instrumental in promoting the success of an...
The circumstances of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation, prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht.   I have the honor to be...
I have maturely reflected on the subject of the within papers. I do not hesitate to give it as my opinion that if it were not for very peculiar personal circumstances the fittest arrangement upon the whole would be to consign the temporary execution of the Comptroller’s office to The Commissioner of the Revenue. But I could not advise this, because it could not fail for strong reasons to be...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...
I have heretofore had occasion to mention to you the merits of Mr. Simmons the writer of the inclosed letter. It is but justice, that I bear in his favour the testimony he desires. I can with truth give my opinion that he is well qualified for the office in question; insomuch that I believe it will be very difficult to find one who has better pretensions. From long service in the Department he...
[ New York, July 6, 1795. On July 7, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of yesterday is this moment received.” Letter not found. ] This letter is also cited in Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 229.
[ New York, July 9, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto. Letter of July 9 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H...
[ New York, July 10, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto.” Letter of July 10 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters...
[ New York, July 11, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I was almost in the act of sending the enclosed letter to the Post Office when your favor of the 11th. was put into my hands.” Letter not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H sent to Washington enclosing parts of H’s “Remarks on the Treaty...
[ New York, July 13, 1795. On July 14, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I received your favor of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, July 20, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 20 not found. ]
[ New York, July 21, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 21 not found. ]
I had the pleasure of receiving two days since your letter of the 31 Ulto. A great press of business and an indifferent state of health have put it out of my power sooner to attend to it. The incidents which have lately occurred have been every way vexatious and untoward. They render indispensable a very serious though calm and measured remonstrance from this Government, carrying among others...
About a fortnight since arrived here Mr. Fristel with G W. Fayette son of the Marquis. The former, who is in capacity of Tutor to the latter, requested me to mention their arrival to you, and that they meant to retire to some place in the neighbouring country ’till they should receive some direction from you. Thus at least I understood him—and accordingly they are gone to a house between...
I have noticed a piece in the Aurora under the signature of the Calm Observer which I think requires explanation and I mean to give one with my name. I have written to Mr. Wolcott for materials from the Books of the Treasury. Should you think it proper to meet the vile insinuation in the close of it by furnishing for one year the account of expenditure of the salary, I will with pleasure add...
I received on the second instant your two letters of the 29th. of October with the inclosures. An answer has been delayed to ascertain the disposition of Mr. King, who through the summer has resided in the country and is only occasionally in Town. I am now able to inform you— he would not accept . Circumstances of the moment conspire with the disgust which a virtuous and independent mind feels...
Your letters of the 16 and 18 instant with their inclosures are received. An extraordinary pressure of professional business has delayed my reply on the subject of Young La Fayette; in which another cause cooperated. I wished without unvieling the motives incidentally to sound the impressions of other persons of Judgment who I knew had been apprised of his being in the Country. The byass of my...
Since my last, La Fayette & his tutor have been here. I conversed with them concerning a future destination, as by way of consultation, without proposing any thing, and in a way best calculated to sooth. But I found that the idea of not being permitted to see you is very painful to them—though they both profess submission to whatever may be your decision & behave modestly. The declaration,...
I have received your letter of the . Young La Fayette is now with me. I had before made an offer of money in your name & have repeated it—but the answer is that they are not yet in want and will have recourse when needed Young La Fayette appears melancholy and has grown thin. A letter lately received from his mother which speaks of something which she wishes him to mention to you (as I learn...
I have the pleasure to send you enclosed two letters one from Young La Fayette the other from his Preceptor. They appear reconciled to some further delay. I take the liberty to inclose copy of a letter to the Secy of State respecting Mr. Cutting. I do not know upon the whole what sort of a man Mr. Cutting is, and I have heared unfavourable whispers. But as to the particular subject of his...
The Bearer of this letter is Doctor Bolman whom you have heared of as having made an attempt for the relief of the Marquis la Fayette which very nearly succeeded. The circumstances of this affair, as stated by Doctor Bolman & Mr. Huger, son of B Huger of St Carolina deceased, who assisted, do real credit to the prudence management and enterprise of the Doctor and shew that he is a man of sense...
This letter contains the first references in Hamilton’s extant correspondence to what proved to be a protracted dispute over the Jay Treaty in the House of Representatives. The Senate approved the Jay Treaty on June 24, 1795, and the United States ratified it on August 14, 1795. Following British ratification on October 28, 1795, the ratifications were exchanged at London on that date....
I found Young La Fayette here and delivered him your Letter which much relieved him. I fancy you will see him on the first day of April. Mr. Livingston’s motion in the House of Representatives, concerning the production of papers has attracted much attention. The opinion of those who think here is, that if the motion succeeds, it ought not to be complied with. Besides that in a matter of such...
I had the honor to receive yesterday your letter of the 22. The course you suggest has some obvious advantages & merits careful consideration. I am not however without fears that there are things in the instructions to Mr. Jay which good policy, considering the matter externally as well as internally , would render it inexpedient to communicate. This I shall ascertain to day. A middle course...
I perceived by the News Paper that the resolution has been carried. I have not been idle as far a⟨s⟩ my situation would permit but ⟨it⟩ will not be in my power as I had hoped to send you what I am preparing by this day’s Post. The next will carry it. It does not however appear necessary that the Executive should be in a hurry. The final result in my mind, for reasons I shal⟨l⟩ submit in my...
I am mortified at not being able to send you by this post a certain draft. But the opinion that reasons ought to be given & pretty fully has extended it to considerable length & a desire to make it accurate as to idea & expression keeps it still upon the anvil. But it is so far prepared that I can assure it by tomorrow’s Post. Delay is always unpleasant. But the case is delicate & important...
I wish the inclosed could have been sent in a more perfect State. But it was impossible. I hope however it can be made out & may be useful. It required more time to say all that was proper in a more condensed form. In considering the course to be pursued by the President it may be well he should be reminded that the same description of men who call for the papers have heretofore maintained...
I have received your resolution and have considered it with the attention always due to a request of the House of Representatives. I feel a consciousness (not contradicted I trust by any part of my conduct) of a sincere disposition to respect the rights privileges and authorities of Congress collectively and in its separate branches—to pay just deference to their opinions and wishes—to avoid...