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The act entitled “an act providing for the payment of certain instalments of the foreign Debts, and of the third instalment due on a Loan made of the Bank of the UStates,” passed the 8th. of this present month of January; empowers the President to cause to be paid the third installment of the 2.000.000 Loan of the Bank of the United States (which did accrue on the last of December 1794 being...
Pursuant to the 13 section of the act entitled “an act making further provision for securing & collecting the duties on foreign & domestic distilled spirits, stills, wines & teas” passed the 5 June 1794; the Commissioner of the Revenue, in consultation with me, has prepared a plan for additional compensations to the Supervisors and other officers of Inspection, & for compensations to such new...
In answer to an enquiry which you were pleased to make I have the honor to transmit a Communication from the Commissioner of the Revenue of the 25 of December. It is true that there have been some defects of execution, but they are by no means such as in my opinion warrant the strong declaration of Mr Butler and I think it probable that they are to be attributed more to that agent whom he...
In my Letter presenting a plan of additional compensations to Supervisors and other officers of Inspection &c. I omitted to mention a material circumstance in the Law, which claims the attention of the President. The section of the act which authorises further allowances, refers them to services rendered, “subsequent to the 30th. day of June next.” These are the words. The act passed the...
I have the honor to send you the extract of a Letter of the 27 of December 1793 from our Commissioners in Holland, stating their having exceeded their instruction in the last Loan of 300.000 of Florins, by an allowance of 5 ⅌ Cent for charges instead of which was prescribed as a limit. Very much disposed to confide in the representation of those Gentlemen & believing there may be policy in not...
An instalment of principal of 1.000.000 of Florins of the Dutch Debt is to be paid on the first of June next. Measures are in train to remit from hence; but there is a possibility, that the events of War may interfere with the execution of the arrangement and render it desirable to be able to attempt a postponement by a new Loan. I ask the permission of The President to give an eventual...
Mr. Wolcott has just informed me That the Secretary of State had called upon him, as by your direction, to confer on the subject of a person to be appointed Comptroller, in the event of his appointment as Secretary of the Treasury and intimated that you had concluded to take some Gentleman from the South—that Mr. Habersham, brother of the Collector of Savannah, was more particularly in your...
I have the honor to transmit to you herewith a copy of the opinion of the Attorney General, with respect to the time to which the expression, “ subsequent to the thirtieth day of June next ,” used in the 13 section of an act making further provision &c. &c. and passed the 5 of June 1794 must be understood to refer. I shall just observe, that my ideas on this subject correspond with the opinion...
Mr Hamilton respectfully informs The President that he will be obliged to keep back ’till Monday his Letter of resignation in order before he sends it to complete the signature of a number of Letters & papers which are in preparation. But it will reach the President in time to admit of a nomination on that day of a successor, if the President thinks fit. LC , George Washington Papers, Library...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to the President—sends him some memorandums of recommendations of officers of Inspection. With regard to the Supervisor of the So. Western Territory, he is of opinion that still further information is necessary. He believes Mr. William Nichols who is the brother of Colo. Nichols to be a fit person for Inspector of the Revenue for the first survey of...
I have the honor to send you the copy of a Letter of the 27 instant from the Collector of Philadelphia —of another letter of the 30 ultimo from that officer to the Atty. of the District of Pennsylvania, and of a deposition of Charles Hemes taken before Judge Peters. These documents establish an improper attempt of Mr. Petri the French Consul to evade a Law of the United States, and allow a...
Previous to the leaving my present Office there are a few points which I think it my duty to bring under the consideration of the President. The first regards the present state and arrangement of the Mint. It is certain that this establishment is capable of producing very important benefits to the community. At this moment when an unusually large and a sudden exportation of silver has produced...
Agreeably to the intimation heretofore given I have the honor now to tender you my resignation of the office of Secretary of the Treasury and to be With sincere respect and affectionate attachment   Sir   Your most Obedient & humble servant ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, December 1, 1794 , January 30, 1795 .
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
My particular acknowlegements are due for your very kind letter of yesterday. As often as I may recall the vexations I have endured, your approbation will be a great and precious consolation. It was not without a struggle, that I yielded to the very urgent motives, which impelled me to relinquish a station, in which I could hope to be in any degree instrumental in promoting the success of an...
The circumstances of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation, prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht.   I have the honor to be...
I have maturely reflected on the subject of the within papers. I do not hesitate to give it as my opinion that if it were not for very peculiar personal circumstances the fittest arrangement upon the whole would be to consign the temporary execution of the Comptroller’s office to The Commissioner of the Revenue. But I could not advise this, because it could not fail for strong reasons to be...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...
I have heretofore had occasion to mention to you the merits of Mr. Simmons the writer of the inclosed letter. It is but justice, that I bear in his favour the testimony he desires. I can with truth give my opinion that he is well qualified for the office in question; insomuch that I believe it will be very difficult to find one who has better pretensions. From long service in the Department he...
[ New York, July 6, 1795. On July 7, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of yesterday is this moment received.” Letter not found. ] This letter is also cited in Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 229.
[ New York, July 9, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto. Letter of July 9 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H...
[ New York, July 10, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto.” Letter of July 10 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters...
[ New York, July 11, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I was almost in the act of sending the enclosed letter to the Post Office when your favor of the 11th. was put into my hands.” Letter not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H sent to Washington enclosing parts of H’s “Remarks on the Treaty...
[ New York, July 13, 1795. On July 14, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I received your favor of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, July 20, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 20 not found. ]
[ New York, July 21, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 21 not found. ]
I had the pleasure of receiving two days since your letter of the 31 Ulto. A great press of business and an indifferent state of health have put it out of my power sooner to attend to it. The incidents which have lately occurred have been every way vexatious and untoward. They render indispensable a very serious though calm and measured remonstrance from this Government, carrying among others...
About a fortnight since arrived here Mr. Fristel with G W. Fayette son of the Marquis. The former, who is in capacity of Tutor to the latter, requested me to mention their arrival to you, and that they meant to retire to some place in the neighbouring country ’till they should receive some direction from you. Thus at least I understood him—and accordingly they are gone to a house between...
I have noticed a piece in the Aurora under the signature of the Calm Observer which I think requires explanation and I mean to give one with my name. I have written to Mr. Wolcott for materials from the Books of the Treasury. Should you think it proper to meet the vile insinuation in the close of it by furnishing for one year the account of expenditure of the salary, I will with pleasure add...
I received on the second instant your two letters of the 29th. of October with the inclosures. An answer has been delayed to ascertain the disposition of Mr. King, who through the summer has resided in the country and is only occasionally in Town. I am now able to inform you— he would not accept . Circumstances of the moment conspire with the disgust which a virtuous and independent mind feels...
Your letters of the 16 and 18 instant with their inclosures are received. An extraordinary pressure of professional business has delayed my reply on the subject of Young La Fayette; in which another cause cooperated. I wished without unvieling the motives incidentally to sound the impressions of other persons of Judgment who I knew had been apprised of his being in the Country. The byass of my...
Since my last, La Fayette & his tutor have been here. I conversed with them concerning a future destination, as by way of consultation, without proposing any thing, and in a way best calculated to sooth. But I found that the idea of not being permitted to see you is very painful to them—though they both profess submission to whatever may be your decision & behave modestly. The declaration,...
I have received your letter of the . Young La Fayette is now with me. I had before made an offer of money in your name & have repeated it—but the answer is that they are not yet in want and will have recourse when needed Young La Fayette appears melancholy and has grown thin. A letter lately received from his mother which speaks of something which she wishes him to mention to you (as I learn...
I have the pleasure to send you enclosed two letters one from Young La Fayette the other from his Preceptor. They appear reconciled to some further delay. I take the liberty to inclose copy of a letter to the Secy of State respecting Mr. Cutting. I do not know upon the whole what sort of a man Mr. Cutting is, and I have heared unfavourable whispers. But as to the particular subject of his...
The Bearer of this letter is Doctor Bolman whom you have heared of as having made an attempt for the relief of the Marquis la Fayette which very nearly succeeded. The circumstances of this affair, as stated by Doctor Bolman & Mr. Huger, son of B Huger of St Carolina deceased, who assisted, do real credit to the prudence management and enterprise of the Doctor and shew that he is a man of sense...
This letter contains the first references in Hamilton’s extant correspondence to what proved to be a protracted dispute over the Jay Treaty in the House of Representatives. The Senate approved the Jay Treaty on June 24, 1795, and the United States ratified it on August 14, 1795. Following British ratification on October 28, 1795, the ratifications were exchanged at London on that date....
I found Young La Fayette here and delivered him your Letter which much relieved him. I fancy you will see him on the first day of April. Mr. Livingston’s motion in the House of Representatives, concerning the production of papers has attracted much attention. The opinion of those who think here is, that if the motion succeeds, it ought not to be complied with. Besides that in a matter of such...
I had the honor to receive yesterday your letter of the 22. The course you suggest has some obvious advantages & merits careful consideration. I am not however without fears that there are things in the instructions to Mr. Jay which good policy, considering the matter externally as well as internally , would render it inexpedient to communicate. This I shall ascertain to day. A middle course...
I perceived by the News Paper that the resolution has been carried. I have not been idle as far a⟨s⟩ my situation would permit but ⟨it⟩ will not be in my power as I had hoped to send you what I am preparing by this day’s Post. The next will carry it. It does not however appear necessary that the Executive should be in a hurry. The final result in my mind, for reasons I shal⟨l⟩ submit in my...
I am mortified at not being able to send you by this post a certain draft. But the opinion that reasons ought to be given & pretty fully has extended it to considerable length & a desire to make it accurate as to idea & expression keeps it still upon the anvil. But it is so far prepared that I can assure it by tomorrow’s Post. Delay is always unpleasant. But the case is delicate & important...
I wish the inclosed could have been sent in a more perfect State. But it was impossible. I hope however it can be made out & may be useful. It required more time to say all that was proper in a more condensed form. In considering the course to be pursued by the President it may be well he should be reminded that the same description of men who call for the papers have heretofore maintained...
I have received your resolution and have considered it with the attention always due to a request of the House of Representatives. I feel a consciousness (not contradicted I trust by any part of my conduct) of a sincere disposition to respect the rights privileges and authorities of Congress collectively and in its separate branches—to pay just deference to their opinions and wishes—to avoid...
The express is this morning gone off with your letter to Young LaFayette. I foresaw when in Philadelphia certain machinations on this subject. I rejoice in the decision you have come to, in regard to the papers. Whatever may happen, it is right in itself—will elevate the character of the President—and inspire confidence abroad. The contrary would have encouraged a spirit of usurpation the...
I have done something but not what I intended. The sitting of two Courts & my professional engagements there prevent the execution of my plan. I no longer withold the paper lest circumstances should render it of any use. Most Affecy & resp ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. The New York Court of Chancery met in New York City on the last Tuesday in March; the New York Supreme Court...
It gives me great pleasure to have the opportunity of announcing to you one whom I know to be so interesting to You as the bearer of this Mr. Motier La Fayette. I allow myself to share by anticipation the satisfaction which the Meeting will afford to all the parties—the more, as I am persuased, that time will confirm the favourable representation I have made of the person & justify the...
The letter of which the inclosed is a copy contains such extraordinary matter that I could not hesitate to send it to you. The writer is Mr. G—— M——. I trust the information it conveys cannot be true; yet in these wild times every thing is possible. Your official information may serve as a comment. Very respectfully & affectly   I have the honor to be   Sir Yr Obed ser ALS , George Washington...
When last in Philadelphia you mentioned to me your wish that I should re dress a certain paper which you had prepared. As it is important that a thing of this kind should be done with great care and much at leisure touched & retouched, I submit a wish that as soon as you have given it the body you mean it to have that it may be sent to me. A few days since I transmitted you the copy of a...
A belief that the occasion to which they may be applicable is not likely to occur, whatever may have been once intended, or pretended in terrorem , has delayed the following observations in compliance with your desire —and which are now the result of conferences with the Gentleman you named. The precise form of any proposition or demand which may be made to or of this Government must so...
Your letter of the 29th was delivered me by Mr. King yesterday afternoon. I thought I had acknowleged the Receipt of the paper inquired for in a letter written speedily after it—or in one which transmitted you a draft of a certain letter by Mr. Jay. I hope this came to hand. I am almost afraid to appear officious in what I am going to say; but the matter presses so deeply on my mind that...
I have received information this morning of a nature which I think you ought to receive without delay. A Mr. Le Guen , a Frenchman, a client of mine and in whom I have inspired confidence, and who is apparently a discreet and decent man, called on me this morning to consult me on the expediency of his becoming naturalized, in order that certain events between France and the U States might not...