You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Hamilton, Alexander
  • Period

    • Washington Presidency
  • Project

    • Hamilton Papers

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
Results 2751-2800 of 3,272 sorted by editorial placement
The best reply that I can make to your letter on the subject of the Eliza’s Cargo is, to furnish you with an Abstract of Mr. Elders statement to the Judge and a copy of your certificate subjoined thereto. These documents will go to shew, that the opinion expressed in my letter to you of the 22d. instant was not loosely founded. I am with consideration   Sir   Your Most Obedt. Servt. Copy,...
[ Philadelphia, January 29, 1795. On February 7, 1795, Carrington wrote to Hamilton : “By the last mail I had the Honor to receive yours of the 29th. Ult.” Letter not found. ]
I am to acknowledge the Receipt of your Letters of the 20th. of December & 24th. instant. You will be pleased to prepare an Act to be submitted to the President for comprehending the River Ohio in the District of Ohio as far as it now borders upon it and for comprehending it in the Second Survey as proposed. No act of the President can give concurrent jurisdiction to Officers of different...
Your letter of the 10th. instant with its inclosures has been duly received. I have to request that you will continue to suspend untill further orders the prosecution of Mr. Messoniers Bond provided he pays the duty on all such part, if any, as was not re-exported. The same conduct is to be observed towards others in a similar situation. In the clause you quote the word “except” after the word...
You are unfortunate, if a wrong Statement has been made by the party confirmed by your own Certificate and by the report of the district Judge. I could only regret that an error had come to me so Sanctionned. But Coming in such a Shape it was impossible for me not to conclude as I did. I send you a further extract from the Petition (the truth of which you have certified) which follows...
I beg leave, through you, to inform the House of Representatives, that pursuant to the duty enjoined by law upon the head of this department, I have prepared a report, containing Some suggestions for the improvement and better management of the Several branches of the actual revenues of the United States, which is ready to be communicated, as the House may please to direct. With perfect...
Mr Hamilton respectfully informs The President that he will be obliged to keep back ’till Monday his Letter of resignation in order before he sends it to complete the signature of a number of Letters & papers which are in preparation. But it will reach the President in time to admit of a nomination on that day of a successor, if the President thinks fit. LC , George Washington Papers, Library...
Being arrived at the day some time since fixed for my resignation, I cannot forbear, among the last acts of my administration, to repeat to the President and Directors of the Bank of the United States the very deep sense I entertain of that prompt, decided, and uniform, Support which they have given to my Administration, and to the Public service connected with the Department under my...
[ Philadelphia, January 31, 1795. On February 9, 1795, Coxe wrote to Oliver Wolcott, Jr.: “A letter of the 31st. Ultimo from the late Secretary of the Treasury having confirmed the opinion that there does not exist authority to defray the expence of gauging wines by the Collectors of the Customs on Importation, if they are liable to duty ad valorem.” Letter not found. ] H wrote this letter in...
I have the honor to transmit herewith, reports on petitions heretofore referred to me by the House of Representatives, and to return others, as noted at foot, the subjects of which have been embraced in Communications already made from this department; and to be, With perfect respect, Sir, Your most obedient, and humble servant Copy, RG 233, Reports of the Secretary of the Treasury, 1784–1795,...
[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives] The Secretary of the Treasury respectfully makes the following report to the House of Representatives. According to the present laws imposing duties on articles imported into the United States, not much Short of one third of the whole amount of the duties is derived from articles rated advalorem. In other nations, where this branch of revenue,...
[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives] The Secretary of the Treasury, respectfully makes the following report upon the petition of Thomas Coit, referred to him by the House of Representatives. The petitioner seeks a discharge from the responsibility from a sum of 157 dollars, which were in his hands as a collector of the revenue, and which are alledged to have been wholly lost, in...
[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives] The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred the petition of the Corporation of Rhode Island College, respectfully makes thereupon, the following report. The said petition seeks indemnification for injuries done to, and compensation for the occupation of the Edifice of the college of Rhode Island, from the tenth of December, 1776, to the...
[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives] The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred the petition of William Gardner, Commissioner of loans for New Hampshire, respectfully reports thereupon, as follows: There is no branch of the public service which more than this requires such an arrangement as will secure a selection of fit characters willing to accept the office, and to...
[To the Speaker of the House of Representatives] The Secretary of the Treasury, to whom was referred by the House of Representatives, the memorial of Moses White, submits the following report thereon. That the items Constituting the Account of the memorialist, which he prays may be allowed, may be classed under the following heads, viz: Dollars cents 1st. Expenses incurred on Sundry journies...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to the President—sends him some memorandums of recommendations of officers of Inspection. With regard to the Supervisor of the So. Western Territory, he is of opinion that still further information is necessary. He believes Mr. William Nichols who is the brother of Colo. Nichols to be a fit person for Inspector of the Revenue for the first survey of...
I have the honor to send you the copy of a Letter of the 27 instant from the Collector of Philadelphia —of another letter of the 30 ultimo from that officer to the Atty. of the District of Pennsylvania, and of a deposition of Charles Hemes taken before Judge Peters. These documents establish an improper attempt of Mr. Petri the French Consul to evade a Law of the United States, and allow a...
Previous to the leaving my present Office there are a few points which I think it my duty to bring under the consideration of the President. The first regards the present state and arrangement of the Mint. It is certain that this establishment is capable of producing very important benefits to the community. At this moment when an unusually large and a sudden exportation of silver has produced...
Agreeably to the intimation heretofore given I have the honor now to tender you my resignation of the office of Secretary of the Treasury and to be With sincere respect and affectionate attachment   Sir   Your most Obedient & humble servant ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, December 1, 1794 , January 30, 1795 .
It is probable that before this reaches you you will have heard of my determination to resign my Office of Secretary of the Treasury as on this day. The event will accordingly take place. I could not permit myself to renounce my official situation without placing among my last Acts the expression of the high sense I continue to entertain of the fidelity and ability with which you have...
The near approach of the time of my departure from this City prevented my sending back Master Philip. I thank you for your obliging conduct in regard to him and my other boy & generally towards this family. Have the goodness, My Dear Sir, to send me your account with as little delay as possible. Mrs Hamilton also requests that you will send here by the first opportunity Philip’s Bedstead...
[To the President of the Senate] The Secretary of the Treasury to whom was referred by the Senate, the Memorial of Oliver and Thompson respectfully makes thereupon the following report. It is the object of this Memorial to obtain restitution for a sum of duties alleged to have been overpaid in the district of Baltimore in consequence of certain mistakes. The business of rectifying mistakes in...
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
My particular acknowlegements are due for your very kind letter of yesterday. As often as I may recall the vexations I have endured, your approbation will be a great and precious consolation. It was not without a struggle, that I yielded to the very urgent motives, which impelled me to relinquish a station, in which I could hope to be in any degree instrumental in promoting the success of an...
The circumstances of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation, prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht.   I have the honor to be...
I expect early in the next week to leave this place with Mrs. Hamilton & the Children for Albany. Our stay at New York will be a very few days, but during the time we wish not to incommode any private family. Therefore you will oblige me by engaging for us lodgings while we stay at some lodging house. Yrs. truly Thursday we may arrive. ALS , Mr. John F. Reed, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania.
I have maturely reflected on the subject of the within papers. I do not hesitate to give it as my opinion that if it were not for very peculiar personal circumstances the fittest arrangement upon the whole would be to consign the temporary execution of the Comptroller’s office to The Commissioner of the Revenue. But I could not advise this, because it could not fail for strong reasons to be...
Every moment’s reflection increases my chagrin and disgust at the failure of the propositions concerning the unsubscribed Debt. I am tortured by the idea that the Country should be so completely and so unnecessarily dishonored. A day of reckoning must come. I pray you, let the yeas and nays seperate the wheat from the chaff . I may otherwise have to feel the distress of wounding a friend by a...
The unnecessary capricious & abominable assassination of the National honor by the rejection of the propositions respecting the unsubscribed debt in the House of Representatives haunts me every step I take, and afflicts me more than I can express. To see the character of the Government and the country so sported with, exposed to so indelible a blot puts my heart to the Torture. Am I then more...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...
I have received your letter with the printed Bills. The new clause is an additional bad feature. Yet ’tis better the thing should pass as it is than not at all. Every thing should be gained that can be. So: It seems that under the present administration of the Department, Hillhouse & Goodhue are to be the Ministers in the House of Representatives & Elsworth & Strong in the Senate. Fine work we...
[ New York, February 28, 1795. On April 20, 1795, Gore wrote to Hamilton : “I have hitherto delayed answering the letter, you did me the honor to write under date 28 Febry.” Letter not found. ] Gore was the United States attorney for the District of Massachusetts.
It is an eternity Dear Angelica since either your sister or myself have received a single line from you. We know not what to hope and therefore we are much inclined to fear. Are you really coming to us—or is some new incident for ever to arrest you? Is there—? But we will not allow ourselves to despond. You must & will come. You know how much we all love you. Tis impossible you can be so well...
[ Albany, March 8, 1795. On March 21, 1795, Jones wrote to Hamilton : “Agreeably to the request contained in your letter of the 8th. instant.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, March 8, 1795. The dealer’s catalogue description of this letter states that it concerns “Business matters.” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold at Ritter-Hopson Galleries, October 18, 1932, Item 71. A native of London, Walker had imigrated immigrated to America before the American Revolution and settled in New York City. During the war he had served as aide-de-camp to Baron von Steuben....
Some time since, I, as Agent for my brother in law Mr. Church entered into an arrangement with Mr. Tench Coxe for investing a sum of money on the joint account of Mr. Church & Mr. Coxe in the purchase of lands in Pensylvania. The copy of a letter from Mr. Coxe herewith sent of the 10th of April 1793 will explain to you the then state of the transaction. But I learn from Mr. Coxe that the tract...
[ Albany, March 18, 1795. On March 30, 1795, Jones wrote to Hamilton : “Your favor of the 18th. instant has been duly received.” Letter not found. ]
Albany, March 18, 1795. “… I have for the present come to a conclusion not to accept any general retainer; so that as far as your letter contemplates an indefinite engagement for you ⟨in⟩ suits and cases, I must decline. I shall note provisionally your request with regard to McComb, Prime, John R. Livingston and Seixas . There is nothing to prevent my being engaged for you in these cases. With...
I called at your house the Evening before you left Town to bid you adieu & was sorry that I was not so fortunate as to find you at home. I am now here with Mrs. Hamilton at her Fathers house where we shall remain till the beginning of June & then take up our abode at New York where I shall be at all times happy to have it in my power to render you any service or pleasure. Your steady friend...
You will oblige me by sending me as soon as may be (first obtaining the consent of Mr Wolcott) a statement of the respective amounts of the several Items, of the Domestic Debt as they originally stood distributed among the several states. You once made out such a paper for me. Yours with regard LC , RG 53, Register of the Treasury, Estimates and Statements for 1795, Vol. “137-T,” National...
[ Albany, March 18, 1795. On the back of a letter which Pollock wrote to Hamilton on January 15, 1795 , Hamilton wrote: “Albany, March 18. 1795. Answer.” Letter not found. ]
[ Albany, March 23, 1795. On March 31, 1795, Troup wrote to Hamilton : “I have just this moment recived yours of the 23rd inst.” Letter not found. ] Troup, a close friend of H since the time when they had been students at King’s College, was a New York City and Albany attorney. A veteran of the American Revolution, he served as secretary of the Board of War (1778–1779) and secretary of the...
I have heretofore had occasion to mention to you the merits of Mr. Simmons the writer of the inclosed letter. It is but justice, that I bear in his favour the testimony he desires. I can with truth give my opinion that he is well qualified for the office in question; insomuch that I believe it will be very difficult to find one who has better pretensions. From long service in the Department he...
I am favoured with your letter of the 26. of March. It is curious to learn that in Massachusettes the assumption of the state Debts should be attacked. In the theory of the plan, tis impossible there can be an increase of debt; for the sum assumed for each state was charged to that state in the settlement of accounts and served to diminish the ballance of some states and increase that of...
Albany, April 2, 1795. “Particular circumstances have interfered until this time with my acknog the receipt & replying to your letter of the 9th March last. After full reflection I am of opinion that I cannot with propriety be concerned on your behalf in the Case you mention. This arises from the Situation in which I have been with regard to the subject of it as a Public officer and from my...
Albany, April 2, 1795. Accepts DeWitt’s offer to serve as counsel for the town of Kingston, New York, except for two cases in which he has been retained by other clients. ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. H wrote this draft on the back of DeWitt’s letter to him of March 16, 1795 .
Mr. Henry Kuhl Principal Clerk in the Comptrollers office has informed me that he is a candidate for the place of Assistant Cashier to the Bank of the UStates and has requested a testimonial of my opinion of his qualifications. I without scruple give it and in the strongest manner: I cannot imagine a man better qualified for such a place than he is. A thorough knowlege of accounts—a very clear...
[ Albany, April 10, 1795. On April 10, 1795, Hamilton wrote to Oliver Wolcott, Jr. : “I send a letter to The Attorney General which you will read seal & deliver.” Letter not found. ]
I wrote you a few lines by the last Post. I sit down to fulfil my promise then made. The fulfilment of our foreign engagements under the existing circumstances is no doubt a perplexing task—But I hope it will not be found impracticable to effect enough to preserve character and credit. Every thing must be done to this end, though with considerable sacrifices, provided you do not go so far as...
[ Albany, April 13, 1795. On April 22, 1795, Johnson and Company wrote to Hamilton : “Your favor of the 13th inst. is recd.” Letter not found. ] See Horace and Seth Johnson and Company to H, April 9, 1795, note 4 .