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[Philadelphia] Gazette of the United States , June 4, 1792. Part of the column devoted to correspondence in the June 4, 1792, issue of the Gazette of the United States is attributed to H by Philip Marsh (“Further Attributions to Hamilton’s Pen,” The New-York Historical Society Quarterly , XL [October, 1956], 353–54). No other evidence, however, of H’s authorship has been found.
In pursuance of a resolution of the House of Representatives, bearing date of the 19th of this instant, we lay before them a copy of the journal of our Board, and a statement of the purchases made since our last report to Congress. We have the honor, sir, to be, your most obedient servants, ASP American State Papers, Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States...
It is probable that many of you are not sufficiently apprised of the advantages of your own situation, and that for want of judging rightly of it, and of your future prospects, you may be tempted to part with your securities much below their true value, and considerably below what it is probable they will sell for in eight or nine months from this time. To guard you against an unnecessary...
Let us now turn to the other side of the medal. To be struck with it, it is not necessary to exaggerate. All who are not wilfully blind must see and acknowlege that this Country at present enjoys an unexampled state of prosperity. That war would interrupt it need not be affirmed. We should then by war lose the advantage of that astonishing progress in strength wealth and improvement, which we...
Independent of the commands of honor, the coolest calculations of interest forbid our becoming the instruments of the Ambition of France, by associating with her in the War. The question is no longer the establishment of liberty on the basis of Republican Government. This point, the enemies of France have ceased to dispute. The question now is whether she shall be aggrandized by new...
The Paris Accounts inform us that France has lately exercised towards Genoa an act of atrocious oppression, which is an additional and a striking indication of the domineering and predatory Spirit by which she is governed. This little Republic, whose territory scarcely extends beyond the walls of her metropolis, has been compelled, it seems, to ransom herself from the talons of France by a...
For The Minerva. The French republic have, at various times, during the present war, complained of certain principles, and decisions of the American government, as being violations of its neutrality, or infractions of the treaty made with France in the year 1778. These complaints were principally made in the year 1793, and explanations, which, till now, were deemed satisfactory, were made by...
There are appearances too strong not to excite apprehension that the affairs of this Country are drawing fast to an eventful crisis. Various circumstances dayly unfolding themselves authorise a conclusion that France has adopted a system of conduct towards the neutral maritime nations generally which amount to little less than actual hostility. I mean the total interruption of their Trade with...
The emissaries of France when driven from every other expedient for extenuating her depredations have a last refuge in the example of Great Britain. The Treatment which we receive from France (say they) is not worse than that which was received from Great Britain. If this apology were founded in fact it would still be a miserable subterfuge. For what excuse is it to France, or what consolation...
10Amicus, [11 September 1792] (Hamilton Papers)
For the National Gazette. A writer in the Gazette of Saturday last, after several observations, with regard to certain charges, which have lately been brought forward against the Secretary of State, proceeds to make or insinuate several charges against another public character. As to the observations which are designed to exculpate the Secretary of State, I shall do nothing more than refer to...
For the Gazette of the United States Mr. Fenno It was easy to foresee, when the hint appeared in your Gazette of [25th July] that the Editor of the National Gazette received a salary from the General Government, advantage would be taken of its want of explicitness and particularity to make the circumstance matter of merit in Mr. Freneau and an argument of his independent disinterestedness....
For the Gazette of the United States . The charges which have been brought against “the EDITOR of the NATIONAL GAZETTE,” as he himself states them to be, are no otherwise personal charges, than as they designate the persons , against whom they are made. In their application to Mr. Freneau, they affect him solely in his capacity of Editor of a public paper (which may justly be considered as a...
For the Gazette of the United States Facts, Mr. Fenno, speak louder than words, and, under certain circumstances, louder even than oaths. The Editor of the National Gazette must not think to swear away their efficacy. If he be, truly, as they announce, the pensioned tool of the public character, who has been named, no violation of truth, in any shape, ought to astonish. Equivocations and...
14Anti-Defamer, [19 August 1792] (Hamilton Papers)
For the Fœderal Gazette Russel under an affected moderation veils the most insidious and malignant designs & slily propagates the basest slanders. This is evident from the following passage of his second paper. After stating a visionary and impracticable scheme for avoiding a war with the Indians —he proceeds thus—“But then, how many offices had been wanting, how many lucrative contracts would...
The [New York] Argus. Greenleaf’s New Daily Advertiser , December 27, 1796. In reprinting this handbill signed by “A True American,” the Argus stated that on December 13, 1796, “three thousand of the following hand-bill were slily pushed under the knockers and doors of the citizens under cover of the darkness of the night.” The Argus suggests, but does not categorically state, that H wrote...
SCHEDULE E Abstract of the Public Debt of the States Undermentioned, Agreeably to Statements Transmitted in Pursuance of the Resolution of the House of Representatives of the 21st of September, 1789. Massachusetts Dollars.   Cents. Principal with interest to the 1st day of Nov. 1789. £. 1,548,040 7 9 Lawful. Due to sundries for which no certificates have yet been issued,     20,000     Total,...
As the removal of the residence of Congress from this city will necessarily dissolve our association for the education of our children under your care, and as those of us who remain, do not see a probability of immediately filling up our former number, we take this method of unitedly expressing the entire confidence we have in your talents, and our approbation of your method of tuition. We...
Lieutenant Colonel Beckwith.   The gazette of the United States, published this morning gives us a detailed account of certain recent proceedings in the Western territory and at Detroit, communicated at Pittsburgh, by a person of the name of Ray, who had been made prisoner by the Savages, and having, as it is stated been purchased by an officer in The King’s Service, obtained his freedom, was...
Lt. Colonel Beckwith. The newspapers of yesterday and of this day mention communications to the two Houses, from The President, on the subject of a commercial treaty with us, and although no particulars are stated, yet enough is expressed to convey an impression to the public mind, that we are not disposed to form any such treaty. I have in former conversations had the honor of declaring my...
Mr. Beckwith. I take the liberty of speaking very freely to you on every subject, and upon this principle give me leave to remark, that I was sorry to observe a certain warmth of expression in one paragraph of the address of Your House of Representatives, in reply to The President’s speech, which respected your commerce and navigation. Mr. —— You know perfectly, that we have different opinions...
[Beckwith] “Having heard that Governor St. Clair had asserted since his arrival in this place, that the Indians in the Western Territory are induced to continue their hostilities by traders under the protection of Detroit purchasing their prisoners for a sum of money, who compel such prisoners into indentures of a limited servitude for the purposes of repayment and on disadvantageous terms, I...
[ Philadelphia, March-April, 1791. “… the Vice-president, Secretaries of the Treasury & War & myself met on the 11th.… I mentioned to the gentlemen the idea of suggesting thro’ Colo. Beckwith, our knowlege of the conduct of the British officers in furnishing the Indians with arms & ammunition, & our dissatisfaction. Colo. Hamilton said that Beckwith had been with him on the subject, and had...
Mr. —— I believe I told you during the winter, that Colonel Smith went to England on private business altogether, in part for his Father in Law the Vice President, and he had other personal objects in respect to our funds. Whether it was conceived in London that Mr. Smith had political objects there or not, I cannot say, but after certain explanations, he had a conversation of some length with...
Mr. _____ I have read the determination of the National Assembly of France of the 25th. of August, respecting the Family Compact, their cordial support of Spain seems at present very questionable. I cannot help thinking that the friendship of this country is not unimportant to you, even at present, and it will become infinitely more so; the resources of France and of Spain if well administered...
7.   [Beckwith] I am directed by Lord Dorchester to thank You for those expressions of civility, which You were pleased to use with respect to him, when I had the pleasure of seeing You in autumn, and for the confidence You reposed in His Lordship, in the communications made by me upon that occasion; they have been transmitted home, and although the delays incident to the season of the year...
7   “If the United States were at war with a great or respectable nation, the case would be different, a foreign mediation under certain circumstances might be desirable; in that case, the manner of the application would be official, and of course not to any public officer of that country abroad, but to the administration at home; on the present occasion, the thing in its existing shape is...
Seventh.   I have requested to see you on this occasion from a Wish to Explain Certain points, relative to our situation, and from a desire to suggest a measure, which I conceive to be both for the interest of Great Britain, and of this Country to adopt. We have lately Established a Government upon principles, that in my opinion render it safe for any Nation to Enter into Treaties with us,...
[Beckwith] “As our packet is to sail to morrow I wish to know, whether any thing has occurred to occasion an addition to the communications, which you were pleased to make to me on the 15th. of last month.” Supposed 7. No, nothing at all. I at the same time think myself warranted to acquaint you, that Mr. Morris’s letters by your June packet mark an alteration in the disposition of your...
… 7.   23. is a man of capacity, but apt at particular times to give himself up too much to the impressions of his own mind. From the Duke of Leed’s reply to 23.’s first application I confess I did not think favorably of the prospect, although it was far from being conclusive. The June packet brought us accounts of his interviews with Mr. Pitt, and from 23.’s own detail of what passed, there...
… Supposed 7. I have mentioned Your application with all the circumstances attending it; there will be no sort of difficulty in Your seeing Mr. Mc.Gillivray whenever you please; General Knox, at whose house he resides, is apprized of it, and will introduce You to him. I cannot think it probable, that any of the attempts to sound Your ideas or dispositions during our negotiations with the...