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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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This will probably be handed you by Mrs De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville of Holland a Gentleman who embarked very zealously and very early in the cause of this country—was instrumental in promoting it and as I understand an object of persecution in consequence of it, which was a link in the chain of his pecuniary ruin. I think his widow has a strong claim upon the kindness of our country...
Mrs. De Neufville widow of Mr. De Neufville formerly of Holland is on her way to Philadelphia to solicit the Kindness of Congress in virtue of services rendered the American cause by her husband. You probably Know their history as South Carolina was particularly concerned. From what I have heard it seems to me her pretensions on the score of her husband to the Kindness of this Country are...
Mrs. De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville formerly of Holland lately passed through this City. On her way she called upon me and announced her intention to make application to Congress on the ground of the political services rendered the UStates by her husband, as in fact a principal cause of his pecuniary misfortunes—and expressed a wish that I would bring her case under your eye. I told her...
I received your late letter in due time. You seem to be of opinion to defer to a future period the commencement of direct taxation. I acknowlege I am inclined to lay gently hold of it now. Leaders of the opposite party favour it now, perhaps with no good design. But it will be well to take them while in the humour and make them share the responsibility. This will be the more easy as they are...
[ New York, January 21, 1797. On January 23, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of the 21st inst. is just received.” Letter not found. ]
I remember that very early in the day & prior to any act of Great Britain the French passed a decree violating with regard to all the neutral powers the principle of free ships free goods & I think making provisions liable to seizure. This decree was afterwards rescinded as to America—then again revived & then again revoked. I want copies of these decrees for a particular purpose useful to the...
There are appearances too strong not to excite apprehension that the affairs of this Country are drawing fast to an eventful crisis. Various circumstances dayly unfolding themselves authorise a conclusion that France has adopted a system of conduct towards the neutral maritime nations generally which amount to little less than actual hostility. I mean the total interruption of their Trade with...
The sitting of the Court and an uncommon pressure of business have unavoidably delayed an answer to your last favour. I have read with attention Mr. Pickerings letter. It is in the main a substantial and satisfactory paper, will in all probability do considerable good in enlightening public opinion at home—and I do not know that it contains any thing which will do harm elsewhere. It wants...
My late situation exposes me to applications which I cannot resist without appearing unkind. It is understood that Mr. Walker is about to resign the place of naval Officer. Mr. Jonathan Burrall Mr. Rogers (Walker’s Deputy) and Col Giles (the present Marshall) have all three mentioned the subject to me and requested me to express my opinion of their qualifications to you. As to Mr. Burrall...
[ New York, February 4, 1797. On February 9, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “Your favour of the 4th only reached me Yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
I duly received your letter of the 23 of Jany with its inclosure, for which I am much obliged to you. I have read it with great pleasure. It is a substantial satisfactory paper will do good in this Country & as to France I presume events will govern there. Is it not proper to call upon the Merchants to furnish your Department with statements & proofs of the spoliations which we have suffered...
Independent of the commands of honor, the coolest calculations of interest forbid our becoming the instruments of the Ambition of France, by associating with her in the War. The question is no longer the establishment of liberty on the basis of Republican Government. This point, the enemies of France have ceased to dispute. The question now is whether she shall be aggrandized by new...
If I recollect right, Chancellor Livingston while Secy for foreign Affairs reported a censure upon Our Commissioners who made the peace with G Britain for not obeying their instructions with regard to France. Will you favour me in confidence with the real state of this business? I was at the time a member of Congress. It was immediately on the arrival of the provisional articles. I trust my...
New York, February 11, 1797. “The suits against Riley as a Partner of Wetmore are expected to be matured for Trial at the ensuing Circuit Court which begins the 20th of March. I should of course want the original documents to establish the Copartnership and the original notes & acknowleged accounts to establish the respective demands of the parties. As the measures preparatory to Trial are...
Geave me leave to recall to your recollection and acquaintance Mr. De Talon the bearer of this, who, as he informs me, goes to Europe on private business. I need not observe that he is an interesting man, as you know all his titles to the attention, which your situation will permit you to afford. You must not think, I forget you, because I do no write (for this is only my third letter). I am...
I groan My Dr. Sir at the disgraceful course of our affairs. I pity all those who are officially in their vortex. The behaviour of Congress in the present crisis is a new political phœnomenon. They must be severally arraigned before the Bar of the Public. How unfortunate that our friends suffer themselves by their passiveness to be confounded in the guilt. Yrs. truly ALS , Connecticut...
The Paris Accounts inform us that France has lately exercised towards Genoa an act of atrocious oppression, which is an additional and a striking indication of the domineering and predatory Spirit by which she is governed. This little Republic, whose territory scarcely extends beyond the walls of her metropolis, has been compelled, it seems, to ransom herself from the talons of France by a...
[ New York, February 23, 1797. On March 3, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton and referred to “Yours of the 23d.” Letter not found. ]
The present inimitable course of our public affairs proves me to be a very bad politician so that I am afraid to suggest any idea that occurs to me. Yet I will give over my timidity & communicate for your consideration a reverie which has struck me. It is a fact, that the resentment of the French Government is very much levelled at the actual President. A change of the person (however...
The emissaries of France when driven from every other expedient for extenuating her depredations have a last refuge in the example of Great Britain. The Treatment which we receive from France (say they) is not worse than that which was received from Great Britain. If this apology were founded in fact it would still be a miserable subterfuge. For what excuse is it to France, or what consolation...
Take my ideas and weigh them of a proper course of conduct for our administration in the present juncture. You have called Congress—tis well. When the Senate meets (which I should be glad to see anticipated) send a Commission extraordinary to France. Let it consist of Jefferson or Madison Pinckney & a third very safe man, say Cabot . Proclaim a Religious solemnity to take place at the Meeting...
[ New York, March 1, 1797. ] “Having reconsidered the case of your Uncle (Wm. Beekman’s) Will with the authorities—I advise the Devisees to claim all that by the Partition became his several property & which in my former opinion with Mr. Evertson was considered as passing by his Will, not merely a proportion equal to his interest before Partition in the part which remained to him after...