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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Washington, George
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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Hamilton Papers

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
Results 341-350 of 403 sorted by editorial placement
Mr Hamilton respectfully informs The President that he will be obliged to keep back ’till Monday his Letter of resignation in order before he sends it to complete the signature of a number of Letters & papers which are in preparation. But it will reach the President in time to admit of a nomination on that day of a successor, if the President thinks fit. LC , George Washington Papers, Library...
Mr. Hamilton presents his respects to the President—sends him some memorandums of recommendations of officers of Inspection. With regard to the Supervisor of the So. Western Territory, he is of opinion that still further information is necessary. He believes Mr. William Nichols who is the brother of Colo. Nichols to be a fit person for Inspector of the Revenue for the first survey of...
I have the honor to send you the copy of a Letter of the 27 instant from the Collector of Philadelphia —of another letter of the 30 ultimo from that officer to the Atty. of the District of Pennsylvania, and of a deposition of Charles Hemes taken before Judge Peters. These documents establish an improper attempt of Mr. Petri the French Consul to evade a Law of the United States, and allow a...
Previous to the leaving my present Office there are a few points which I think it my duty to bring under the consideration of the President. The first regards the present state and arrangement of the Mint. It is certain that this establishment is capable of producing very important benefits to the community. At this moment when an unusually large and a sudden exportation of silver has produced...
Agreeably to the intimation heretofore given I have the honor now to tender you my resignation of the office of Secretary of the Treasury and to be With sincere respect and affectionate attachment   Sir   Your most Obedient & humble servant ADf , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Washington, December 1, 1794 , January 30, 1795 .
I forbear to make any comments on that violent sense of duty which at this late and critical hour has compelled the virtuous mind of Mr. Coxe to make to you the communication contained in his letter of yesterday. I shall proceed to submit to The President with candour and truth my view of the case. Towards this it will be useful to cite the expressions of the Act referred to. They are these...
My particular acknowlegements are due for your very kind letter of yesterday. As often as I may recall the vexations I have endured, your approbation will be a great and precious consolation. It was not without a struggle, that I yielded to the very urgent motives, which impelled me to relinquish a station, in which I could hope to be in any degree instrumental in promoting the success of an...
The circumstances of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation, prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht.   I have the honor to be...
I have maturely reflected on the subject of the within papers. I do not hesitate to give it as my opinion that if it were not for very peculiar personal circumstances the fittest arrangement upon the whole would be to consign the temporary execution of the Comptroller’s office to The Commissioner of the Revenue. But I could not advise this, because it could not fail for strong reasons to be...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...