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The sitting of the Court and an uncommon pressure of business have unavoidably delayed an answer to your last favour. I have read with attention Mr. Pickerings letter. It is in the main a substantial and satisfactory paper, will in all probability do considerable good in enlightening public opinion at home—and I do not know that it contains any thing which will do harm elsewhere. It wants...
My late situation exposes me to applications which I cannot resist without appearing unkind. It is understood that Mr. Walker is about to resign the place of naval Officer. Mr. Jonathan Burrall Mr. Rogers (Walker’s Deputy) and Col Giles (the present Marshall) have all three mentioned the subject to me and requested me to express my opinion of their qualifications to you. As to Mr. Burrall...
Mrs. De Neuville widow of Mr. De Neuville formerly of Holland lately passed through this City. On her way she called upon me and announced her intention to make application to Congress on the ground of the political services rendered the UStates by her husband, as in fact a principal cause of his pecuniary misfortunes—and expressed a wish that I would bring her case under your eye. I told her...
I duly received your letter of the 12th. instant. My avocations have not permitted me sooner to comply with your desire. I have looked over the papers & suggested alterations & corrections; and I have also numbered the paragraphs I. II. III &c in the order in which it appears to me eligble they should stand in the Speech. I thought upon full reflection you could not avoid an allusion to your...
My anxiety for such a course of things as will most promise a continuance of peace to the country, & in the contrary event a full justification of the President, has kept my mind dwelling on the late Reply to Mr. Adet & though it is a thing that cannot be undone, yet if my ideas are right the communication of them may not be wholly useless for the future. The more I have considered that paper...
I have been employed in making and have actually completed a rough draft on the following heads “ National University, Military Academy, Board of Agriculture, Establishment of such manufactories on public account as are relative to the equipment of army & navy, to the extent of the public demand for supply , & excluding all the branches already well established in the country.—The gradual &...
Yesterday after the departure of the Post I received your letter of the 3d. I have since seen the answer to Adet . I perceive in it nothing intrinsically exceptionable—but something in the manner a little epigrammatical and sharp . I make this remark freely, because the Card now to be played is perhaps the most delicate that has occurred in your administration. And nations like Individuals...
I have lately been honored with two letters from you, one from Mount Vernon the other from Philadelphia, which came to hand yesterday. I immediately sent the last to Mr. Jay & conferred with him last night. We settled our opinion on one point—(viz) That whether Mr Adet acted with or without instruction from his Government in publishing his communication, he committed a disrespect towards our...
I have received your letter of the 6th. by the bearer. The draft was sent forward by Post on Tuesday. I shall prepare a paragraph with respect to the University & some others for consideration respecting other points which have occured. With true respect & attachment   I have the honor to be Sir   Yr. very obed serv ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. For background to this letter, see...
I return the draft corrected agreeably to your intimations. You will observe a short paragraph added respecting Education . As to the establishment of a University, it is a point which in connection with military schools, & some other things, I meant, agreeably to your desire to suggest to you, as parts of your Speech at the opening of the session. There will several things come there much...
I have received your two late letters, the last but one transmitting me a certain draft. It will be corrected & altered with attention to your suggestions & returned by Monday’s or Tuesday’s post. The idea of the university is one of those which I think will be most properly reserved for your speech at the opening of the session. A general suggestion respecting education will very fitly come...
About a fortnight since, I sent you a certain draft. I now send you another on the plan of incorporating. Whichever you may prefer, if there be any part you wish to transfer from one to another any part to be changed—or if there be any material idea in your own draft which has happened to be omitted and which you wish introduced—in short if there be any thing further in the matter in which I...
I have the pleasure to send you herewith a certain draft which I have endeavoured to make as perfect as my time and engagements would permit. It has been my object to render this act importantly and lastingly useful, and avoiding all just cause of present exception, to embrace such reflections and sentiments as will wear well, progress in approbation with time, & redound to future reputation....
I was in due time favoured with your letter of the 26 June & consulted the Gentleman you name on the subjects of it. We are both of opinion there is no power in the President to appoint an Envoy Extraordinary, without the concurrence of the senate, & that the information in question is not a sufficient ground for extraordinarily convening the senate. If however the President from his...
I have received information this morning of a nature which I think you ought to receive without delay. A Mr. Le Guen , a Frenchman, a client of mine and in whom I have inspired confidence, and who is apparently a discreet and decent man, called on me this morning to consult me on the expediency of his becoming naturalized, in order that certain events between France and the U States might not...
Your letter of the 29th was delivered me by Mr. King yesterday afternoon. I thought I had acknowleged the Receipt of the paper inquired for in a letter written speedily after it—or in one which transmitted you a draft of a certain letter by Mr. Jay. I hope this came to hand. I am almost afraid to appear officious in what I am going to say; but the matter presses so deeply on my mind that...
A belief that the occasion to which they may be applicable is not likely to occur, whatever may have been once intended, or pretended in terrorem , has delayed the following observations in compliance with your desire —and which are now the result of conferences with the Gentleman you named. The precise form of any proposition or demand which may be made to or of this Government must so...
When last in Philadelphia you mentioned to me your wish that I should re dress a certain paper which you had prepared. As it is important that a thing of this kind should be done with great care and much at leisure touched & retouched, I submit a wish that as soon as you have given it the body you mean it to have that it may be sent to me. A few days since I transmitted you the copy of a...
The letter of which the inclosed is a copy contains such extraordinary matter that I could not hesitate to send it to you. The writer is Mr. G—— M——. I trust the information it conveys cannot be true; yet in these wild times every thing is possible. Your official information may serve as a comment. Very respectfully & affectly   I have the honor to be   Sir Yr Obed ser ALS , George Washington...
It gives me great pleasure to have the opportunity of announcing to you one whom I know to be so interesting to You as the bearer of this Mr. Motier La Fayette. I allow myself to share by anticipation the satisfaction which the Meeting will afford to all the parties—the more, as I am persuased, that time will confirm the favourable representation I have made of the person & justify the...
I have done something but not what I intended. The sitting of two Courts & my professional engagements there prevent the execution of my plan. I no longer withold the paper lest circumstances should render it of any use. Most Affecy & resp ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. The New York Court of Chancery met in New York City on the last Tuesday in March; the New York Supreme Court...
The express is this morning gone off with your letter to Young LaFayette. I foresaw when in Philadelphia certain machinations on this subject. I rejoice in the decision you have come to, in regard to the papers. Whatever may happen, it is right in itself—will elevate the character of the President—and inspire confidence abroad. The contrary would have encouraged a spirit of usurpation the...
I wish the inclosed could have been sent in a more perfect State. But it was impossible. I hope however it can be made out & may be useful. It required more time to say all that was proper in a more condensed form. In considering the course to be pursued by the President it may be well he should be reminded that the same description of men who call for the papers have heretofore maintained...
I have received your resolution and have considered it with the attention always due to a request of the House of Representatives. I feel a consciousness (not contradicted I trust by any part of my conduct) of a sincere disposition to respect the rights privileges and authorities of Congress collectively and in its separate branches—to pay just deference to their opinions and wishes—to avoid...
I am mortified at not being able to send you by this post a certain draft. But the opinion that reasons ought to be given & pretty fully has extended it to considerable length & a desire to make it accurate as to idea & expression keeps it still upon the anvil. But it is so far prepared that I can assure it by tomorrow’s Post. Delay is always unpleasant. But the case is delicate & important...
I perceived by the News Paper that the resolution has been carried. I have not been idle as far a⟨s⟩ my situation would permit but ⟨it⟩ will not be in my power as I had hoped to send you what I am preparing by this day’s Post. The next will carry it. It does not however appear necessary that the Executive should be in a hurry. The final result in my mind, for reasons I shal⟨l⟩ submit in my...
I had the honor to receive yesterday your letter of the 22. The course you suggest has some obvious advantages & merits careful consideration. I am not however without fears that there are things in the instructions to Mr. Jay which good policy, considering the matter externally as well as internally , would render it inexpedient to communicate. This I shall ascertain to day. A middle course...
This letter contains the first references in Hamilton’s extant correspondence to what proved to be a protracted dispute over the Jay Treaty in the House of Representatives. The Senate approved the Jay Treaty on June 24, 1795, and the United States ratified it on August 14, 1795. Following British ratification on October 28, 1795, the ratifications were exchanged at London on that date....
I found Young La Fayette here and delivered him your Letter which much relieved him. I fancy you will see him on the first day of April. Mr. Livingston’s motion in the House of Representatives, concerning the production of papers has attracted much attention. The opinion of those who think here is, that if the motion succeeds, it ought not to be complied with. Besides that in a matter of such...
The Bearer of this letter is Doctor Bolman whom you have heared of as having made an attempt for the relief of the Marquis la Fayette which very nearly succeeded. The circumstances of this affair, as stated by Doctor Bolman & Mr. Huger, son of B Huger of St Carolina deceased, who assisted, do real credit to the prudence management and enterprise of the Doctor and shew that he is a man of sense...
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have the pleasure to send you enclosed two letters one from Young La Fayette the other from his Preceptor. They appear reconciled to some further delay. I take the liberty to inclose copy of a letter to the Secy of State respecting Mr. Cutting. I do not know upon the whole what sort of a man Mr. Cutting is, and I have heared unfavourable whispers. But as to the particular subject of his...
I have received your letter of the . Young La Fayette is now with me. I had before made an offer of money in your name & have repeated it—but the answer is that they are not yet in want and will have recourse when needed Young La Fayette appears melancholy and has grown thin. A letter lately received from his mother which speaks of something which she wishes him to mention to you (as I learn...
Since my last, La Fayette & his tutor have been here. I conversed with them concerning a future destination, as by way of consultation, without proposing any thing, and in a way best calculated to sooth. But I found that the idea of not being permitted to see you is very painful to them—though they both profess submission to whatever may be your decision & behave modestly. The declaration,...
Your letters of the 16 and 18 instant with their inclosures are received. An extraordinary pressure of professional business has delayed my reply on the subject of Young La Fayette; in which another cause cooperated. I wished without unvieling the motives incidentally to sound the impressions of other persons of Judgment who I knew had been apprised of his being in the Country. The byass of my...
I received on the second instant your two letters of the 29th. of October with the inclosures. An answer has been delayed to ascertain the disposition of Mr. King, who through the summer has resided in the country and is only occasionally in Town. I am now able to inform you— he would not accept . Circumstances of the moment conspire with the disgust which a virtuous and independent mind feels...
I have noticed a piece in the Aurora under the signature of the Calm Observer which I think requires explanation and I mean to give one with my name. I have written to Mr. Wolcott for materials from the Books of the Treasury. Should you think it proper to meet the vile insinuation in the close of it by furnishing for one year the account of expenditure of the salary, I will with pleasure add...
About a fortnight since arrived here Mr. Fristel with G W. Fayette son of the Marquis. The former, who is in capacity of Tutor to the latter, requested me to mention their arrival to you, and that they meant to retire to some place in the neighbouring country ’till they should receive some direction from you. Thus at least I understood him—and accordingly they are gone to a house between...
I had the pleasure of receiving two days since your letter of the 31 Ulto. A great press of business and an indifferent state of health have put it out of my power sooner to attend to it. The incidents which have lately occurred have been every way vexatious and untoward. They render indispensable a very serious though calm and measured remonstrance from this Government, carrying among others...
[ New York, July 21, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 21 not found. ]
[ New York, July 20, 1795. On July 29, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letters of the 20th and 21st Instt. found me at this place.” Letter of July 20 not found. ]
[ New York, July 13, 1795. On July 14, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I received your favor of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
[ New York, July 11, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I was almost in the act of sending the enclosed letter to the Post Office when your favor of the 11th. was put into my hands.” Letter not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H sent to Washington enclosing parts of H’s “Remarks on the Treaty...
[ New York, July 10, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto.” Letter of July 10 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters...
[ New York, July 9, 1795. On July 13, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have … been duly favored with your letters of the 9th, accompanying your observations on the several articles of the treaty with Great Britain, and the 10th. supplimentary thereto. Letter of July 9 not found. ] This letter, which was written in reply to Washington to H, July 3, 1795 , was one of three letters which H...
[ New York, July 6, 1795. On July 7, 1795, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “Your letter of yesterday is this moment received.” Letter not found. ] This letter is also cited in Hamilton, History John C. Hamilton, Life of Alexander Hamilton, a History of the Republic of the United States of America (Boston, 1879). , VI, 229.
I have heretofore had occasion to mention to you the merits of Mr. Simmons the writer of the inclosed letter. It is but justice, that I bear in his favour the testimony he desires. I can with truth give my opinion that he is well qualified for the office in question; insomuch that I believe it will be very difficult to find one who has better pretensions. From long service in the Department he...
The evening I had last the pleasure of seeing you, you asked my opinion whether any and what measures could be taken with the Senate with reference to the Treaty with Great Britain in the event of its not arriving before the adjournment of the Legislature. I mentioned as a hasty thought that I feared it would be impracticable to detain them long in expectation of a Treaty not arrived; but that...
I have maturely reflected on the subject of the within papers. I do not hesitate to give it as my opinion that if it were not for very peculiar personal circumstances the fittest arrangement upon the whole would be to consign the temporary execution of the Comptroller’s office to The Commissioner of the Revenue. But I could not advise this, because it could not fail for strong reasons to be...
The circumstances of having offered my late report to Congress to the two houses which rendered two copies necessary & the extreme press of business in the office in preparing for my resignation, prevented my sending you a manuscript copy of that Report. I have now corrected a printed copy for you which I have the honor to send herewith. With true respect & attacht.   I have the honor to be...