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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Hamilton Papers

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
Results 31-40 of 73 sorted by date (descending)
Mr. Hamilton presents his Compliments to Mr. Jefferson. On reflection he concluded it to be most in order to address his communication on the subject of Mr Ternant’s application to the President. A copy which is sent herewith will apprise Mr. Jefferson of its precise import. AL , Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. See H to Jefferson, two letters, November 17, 1792 ; H to George...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respectful Compliments to The Secretary of State and sends two Copies of the Report of the Trustees of the Sinking Fund agreed upon last night with the requisite documents for each. This is the last day for presenting them; so that even if either House should not sit it will be proper to forward the Report to the Presiding Officer. The S of the T....
Mr. Hamilton regrets extremely that an unexpected occurrence has detained him so much beyond the hour mentioned to Mr. Jefferson, that he should fear interrupting him by calling. He requests Mr. Jefferson to mention some other early time convenient to him for the Interview. AL , Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress.
I have only considered the principal subject of the extracts from Mr. Morris’s letters, which you did me the honor to send me, namely the adjustment or liquidation of the payments to France, and am of Opinion, that the Idea which appears to be that of Mr. Morris is the safest now to be pursued vizt.—to ascertain the rate of exchange between Paris and Amsterdam, at each period of payment, as an...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the Secretary of State; incloses a contract for a loan lately concluded which has been submitted to the President and approved. It is now transmitted in order that a ratification in the usual form may be prepared and executed. AL , Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. See H to George Washington, October 31, 1792 , and Tobias Lear...
Mr. Hamilton presents his Compliments to Mr. Jefferson, requests to be informed, if there are any circumstances within his knowlege, more than are mentioned in the in-closed papers, which throw light upon the subject of them; particularly whether the discharge of the Vessels was communicated to The Baron De Steuben at the time it took place or at any time antecedent to the date of the Baron’s...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The Secretary of State requests him to name some hour tomorrow forenoon when it will be convenient to him to receive at his house the Secry of the Treasury & Attorney General on the subject of the sinking fund. AL , Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. At the bottom of this letter Jefferson wrote: “This was to dispose of 50,000...
I have it in contemplation to make arrangements for the payment of the debt, which appears on the Books of the Treasury, to be due to His Most Catholic Majesty, being for advances made on account of the United States during the late War with G Britain. I make this communication, in order that if any reasons against the payment exist in the knowlege of the Department of State they may be made...
Treasury Department, October 6, 1792. Requests information for report ordered by the Senate on May 7, 1792. LS , partly in the handwriting of H, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. The contents of this letter are essentially the same as those of “Treasury Department Circular,” September 13, 1792 .
There are two funds out of which the expense you mention may be defrayed, one a sum originally of 10,000 Dollars, placed under the disposition of the President to defray the Contingent charges of government —another a sum of 5,000 Dollars appropriated at the last Session to satisfy demands liquidated and admitted at the Treasury for which there was no special appropriation. In this Case the...