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    • Hamilton, Alexander
    • Beckwith, George
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    • Washington Presidency
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    Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Author="Beckwith, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Project="Hamilton Papers"
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    Lieutenant Colonel Beckwith.   The gazette of the United States, published this morning gives us a detailed account of certain recent proceedings in the Western territory and at Detroit, communicated at Pittsburgh, by a person of the name of Ray, who had been made prisoner by the Savages, and having, as it is stated been purchased by an officer in The King’s Service, obtained his freedom, was...
    Lt. Colonel Beckwith. The newspapers of yesterday and of this day mention communications to the two Houses, from The President, on the subject of a commercial treaty with us, and although no particulars are stated, yet enough is expressed to convey an impression to the public mind, that we are not disposed to form any such treaty. I have in former conversations had the honor of declaring my...
    Mr. Beckwith. I take the liberty of speaking very freely to you on every subject, and upon this principle give me leave to remark, that I was sorry to observe a certain warmth of expression in one paragraph of the address of Your House of Representatives, in reply to The President’s speech, which respected your commerce and navigation. Mr. —— You know perfectly, that we have different opinions...
    [Beckwith] “Having heard that Governor St. Clair had asserted since his arrival in this place, that the Indians in the Western Territory are induced to continue their hostilities by traders under the protection of Detroit purchasing their prisoners for a sum of money, who compel such prisoners into indentures of a limited servitude for the purposes of repayment and on disadvantageous terms, I...
    [ Philadelphia, March-April, 1791. “… the Vice-president, Secretaries of the Treasury & War & myself met on the 11th.… I mentioned to the gentlemen the idea of suggesting thro’ Colo. Beckwith, our knowlege of the conduct of the British officers in furnishing the Indians with arms & ammunition, & our dissatisfaction. Colo. Hamilton said that Beckwith had been with him on the subject, and had...
    Mr. —— I believe I told you during the winter, that Colonel Smith went to England on private business altogether, in part for his Father in Law the Vice President, and he had other personal objects in respect to our funds. Whether it was conceived in London that Mr. Smith had political objects there or not, I cannot say, but after certain explanations, he had a conversation of some length with...
    Mr. _____ I have read the determination of the National Assembly of France of the 25th. of August, respecting the Family Compact, their cordial support of Spain seems at present very questionable. I cannot help thinking that the friendship of this country is not unimportant to you, even at present, and it will become infinitely more so; the resources of France and of Spain if well administered...
    7.   [Beckwith] I am directed by Lord Dorchester to thank You for those expressions of civility, which You were pleased to use with respect to him, when I had the pleasure of seeing You in autumn, and for the confidence You reposed in His Lordship, in the communications made by me upon that occasion; they have been transmitted home, and although the delays incident to the season of the year...
    7   “If the United States were at war with a great or respectable nation, the case would be different, a foreign mediation under certain circumstances might be desirable; in that case, the manner of the application would be official, and of course not to any public officer of that country abroad, but to the administration at home; on the present occasion, the thing in its existing shape is...
    Seventh.   I have requested to see you on this occasion from a Wish to Explain Certain points, relative to our situation, and from a desire to suggest a measure, which I conceive to be both for the interest of Great Britain, and of this Country to adopt. We have lately Established a Government upon principles, that in my opinion render it safe for any Nation to Enter into Treaties with us,...
    [Beckwith] “As our packet is to sail to morrow I wish to know, whether any thing has occurred to occasion an addition to the communications, which you were pleased to make to me on the 15th. of last month.” Supposed 7. No, nothing at all. I at the same time think myself warranted to acquaint you, that Mr. Morris’s letters by your June packet mark an alteration in the disposition of your...
    … 7.   23. is a man of capacity, but apt at particular times to give himself up too much to the impressions of his own mind. From the Duke of Leed’s reply to 23.’s first application I confess I did not think favorably of the prospect, although it was far from being conclusive. The June packet brought us accounts of his interviews with Mr. Pitt, and from 23.’s own detail of what passed, there...
    … Supposed 7. I have mentioned Your application with all the circumstances attending it; there will be no sort of difficulty in Your seeing Mr. Mc.Gillivray whenever you please; General Knox, at whose house he resides, is apprized of it, and will introduce You to him. I cannot think it probable, that any of the attempts to sound Your ideas or dispositions during our negotiations with the...
    A Conversation: Mr. Hamilton, Mr. William Macomb of Detroit, and Lieutenant Colonel Beckwith. Lt. Colo. B. Mr. Macomb, I think it for the honor of the King’s government, for its interests, and I really believe it for the interests of this country also, that the true state of things in the western Country should be known, and if there are any misconceptions, or errors arising from...
    … supposed 7. There is one thing more which I wish to mention to You; I do it altogether as from one gentleman to an other, and I trust it will be so considered. I have decided on doing it at this time from the possibility of my not having it in my power to come to such an explanation hereafter. If it shall be judged proper to proceed in this business by the sending or appointing a proper...
    An Officer at the Head of an Executive Department Mr. —— Since I saw you, we have got Mr. Ternant, the minister pleniopotentiary from France; I have seen him for a few minutes only. You will find him a man of easy, pleasing manners, and very fit for the objects of his appointment. There has been a sort of alarm in France, and a degree of jealousy of your having lately turned your attention...