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¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I returnd to the city lately to receive our old friend General La Fayette, who after remaining here a few days, set out on Saturday for Yorktown. He has I presume reachd that port by this time. He is in good health & spirits, and less alterd in his form, than I expectd, and not at all in his mind, unless by improvment. He appears to me to have a profound knowledge of mankind, & of the present...
I admire your checks and bridles which you call maxims. To allude to Bolingbrokes figure, Man is a Noble Animal he is a bucephalus that requires an Alexander to ride him, And I believe he could not, without whip, spurs, and bridle. But of all the whips spurs and bridles, those of the Priests are the most detestable; and those of the Presbyterians are not much better, than those of the...
I send herewith, agreeable to your request, Adams’s Roaman Antiquities & Valpy’s Greek Grammar, both of which I wish safe to hand— MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Thoughts on Lotteries, and that on particularly which is now asked It is a common idea that games of chance are immoral. but what is Chance? nothing happens in this world without a cause. if we know the cause , we do not call it chance; but if we do not know it we say it was produced by Chance. if we see a lo a ded die turn it’s lightest side up, we know the cause and that it is not an effect...
In answer to your Letter of yesterday I readily agree that the board of my two Sons residing with you should be for the ensuing year at the rate of five dollars a week each, and I beg you and Mrs. Welsh and Miss Harriet to accept our warmest thanks for your unvarying kindness to them— I am with the strongest respect and attachment Dear Sir / Faithfully Yours MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I recieved this morning your favor of the 17 th have got the correct bills signed by D r Everett, now inclose them and hope they will get to hand before my draught in favor of White gets round to you. the 56. 31 and 88 D. curtail must be retained out of the proceeds of the bill of Exchange, I had in mr G.’s hands at the last statement of our accounts but about 30. D. and he may have paid some...
Although my health is very indifferent, and my eyes soo weak and dim, that within a fortnight, I could Scarce affect any thing, either by labour or in writing—yet I must indulge the gratification of thanking you, for the few affectionate lines with which your kindness favoured me with. My Physician Says—all will be Soon well—the chief remedies are—abstinentia et quiete.Was your life less...
Your favor of Apr. 12. came to hand on the 23 d instant. withdrawn by the effect of age, from the labors of correspondence to which that has rendered me unequal, I am able only to forward your letter and communication to a member of the American Philosophical society at Philadelphia . it is long since I resigned the office of their President, and D r Wistar , who succeeded me is lately dead,...
Your favor of the 10 th was not recieved till the instant, and I regret that it is not in my power to send you the Egyptian wheat which is the subject of your letter. I recieved it while I lived in Washington, and having no means of taking care of such things there, I generally sent them to some one of my careful neighbors. I do not recollect to whom of them I sent this particular article, but...