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Documents filtered by: Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 151-160 of 15,150 sorted by editorial placement
I noticed with great disappointment in the Letters you honored me with the 12 of last month, that you had not then received the Letter which I had the pleasure to write to you at the same time that I sent you the address, which you received with so much kindness and indulgence. I could not help however feeling grateful for the Neglect of some of the Post Offices since it was the cause that...
I am obliged to borrow a hand to thank you for your favour of March 11th. and for introducing to me, Mr Binon—whom I find to be a Gentleman of Sense and Letters—as well as Taste and skill—in all the fine Arts—He has been an agreeable Companion—and we have been fortunate enough to procure the best Accommodations Accommodations for him— Excuse me for I can barely write the name of your Friend,...
If you will permit me to intrude upon the repose of your happy retirement I would beg leave to present you with one of the first Copies of my Prospectus of a national Vaccine Institution, to be established in the City of Washington. And if you should approve of an attempt of this kind it would confer a most distinguished honor to be directed to record your Name on the Book of the Institution...
Considering you a patron of literature & science, & a well wisher to the general interest of education, the editors of the Academician, by this day’s mail, forward you the 1, 2 & 3 Nos. for perusal. Should you approve of the work, your signature as a subscriber & influence to make the work known would aid us very much in effecting the Object we have in view. With the greatest respect, / We...
At the Request of General Welles I write this Letter to introduce Mr. Binon the Artist we yesterday mentioned in the Committee’s Address & whose Services you so kindly condescended to encourage, for the Public Purpose of gratifying the Citizens of this Town, & Posterity. From the Specimen of his Abilities as an Artist of which We have a satisfying Proof in a Bust of General Dearbo r n, we...
I take the liberty to request, that you wd. at your leisure favour me wh. the chronology of the events of your life . Unless your own hand does this, I fear it will be done but imperfectly. Me it wd. cost some research. Many who have them in memory, have not your ability to put them on paper. I am aware, you never can become your own biographer. A life spent in forming materials for history,...
I have recceived with Pride and Pleasure a Volume of Mathematical Papers from a Fellow Citizen and Native of Massachusetts who alredy ranks among the greatest Masters of the Sublimest Sciences which Human Understanding is capable of comprehending. If it is true, as it is reported that you have made a Translation of the Méchanique Céleste, I pray you to admit my name into the List of...
John Adams was Born at Quincy on the 19th. of October 1735. of John and Susana Boylston Adams. he entered College 1751. took his first degree in 1755. kept the Latin School in Worcester.—Studied Law with Coll James Putnam till 1758. when he took his Second degree at College, and was admitted to the Practice of the Law in Boston.—in 1761. he was admitted Barrister in the Supreme Judicial Court...
In Mr Wirts elegant and eloquent Panegyrick on Mr Henry.—I beg your attention to page 56 to page 67. the end of the second section. Where you will read a curious specimen of the agonies of Patriotism in the early Stages of the Revolution—“When Mr Henry could carry his Resolutions but by one Vote, and that against the influence of Randolph, Bland, Pendelton Wythe and all the Old members whose...
Since my last short Conversation with you, I have read Mr. Wirt’s Biographical Romance, a singular Book indeed! Composed more with a View to display the Author’s Talents, than those of his Subject. A better attempt at flattering Virginians, than furnishing Facts for sober, future, Historians. His Materials were scanty indeed, & he has made the most of them. Henry was undoubtedly a bold &...