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D   D  A. Scale house. insured 320. valued 400 B. Transfer 200. 250 C. Warehouse 288  360 808  1010 D. Warehouse 160  200 E. Warehouse 240. 300
Elevations above the height of the eye in the Porticos at Poplar Forest—5’ error of instrum t 1811 E. horison W. horison S. horison Feb. 1 0.
3The Madison Family Tree (Madison Papers)
This family tree, framed under glass, is in LC: Madison Miscellany. For reasons given below, JM could hardly have prepared the chart earlier than the close of 1813 or later than September 1819. He apparently left among his papers at the time of his death a brief statement about his forebears. This document, now lost, came into the possession of his niece, Mrs. Lucie Hartwell Conway. She...
  1815. 16 1816. 17 18 1 7. 18 1818. 19 Total average   *    *    *        negro cloth g
1818. Apr. 4. having recieved mr Fancelli ’s Excha. of Nov. 11. 1817 in fav r of T. Appleton ass d to Tho s Perkins , I inclosed the certificate of the Cash r of the bank (which had been given
February 3, 1829 Mr. Marshall accepts with pleasure the invitation of The President and Mrs. Adams to dine with them on tuesday the 3d. of February at six March 2, 1820 Mr. Marshall accepts with pleasure the invitation of Mr. & Mrs. Adams to dine with them on thursday the 2d. of March at five Mr. Marshall accepts with pleasure the invitation of Mr. Adams to dine with him on thursday next at...
Mr. Clay’s respectful Compliments to Mr. Adams and Mrs. Adams and he regrets Extremely that confinement to his room by indisposition prevents him from having the pleasure of dining with them to day. Tuesday Morning Mr. and Mrs. Clay regret that a very bad cold with which he is afflicted deprives them of the honor of accepting Mr. and Mrs. Adams’s invitation to dinner on friday next. Mrs....
5th Jany— Mr Calhoun accepts with pleasure the invitation of Mr & Mrs Adams for Thursday next 6th Jany. Mr Calhoun accepts with pleasure the invitation of Mr & Mrs Adams for Thursday next. 29th April Mr Calhoun regrets that he cannot accept the invitation of Mr & Mrs Adams to dine with them to day. 13th June Mr Calhoun accepts with pleasure the invitation of Mr Adams for tomorrow 19th Decr. Mr...
Monday Morning. Mr Webster accepts with pleasure Mr & Mrs Adam’s Invitation to dine on Thursday— Sir, Wednesday 3 ‘clock I am, today, affected with So severe a cold it has been quite impossible for me to call at the Department, as I proposed to do, last Evening. I hope to be well enough to do it on friday. Yrs, with very true / regard Wednesday P.M Mr Webster very much regrets that the...
I do not feel quite well enough to be out today—having suffered a little from being out yesterday—and I would not wish you to detain, on my acc’t, the Papers which you wish to send off for Chili—Both myself and friends shall be Entirely satisfied to follow your suggestion—I will, nevertheless, have the pleasure of calling at the Department on the subject, at an Early opportunity— With entire...
Mr Webster, accepts with great pleasure Mr & Mrs Adams invitation to dine on Thursday next— MHi : Adams Papers.
By mistake two of your Shirts were Sent without marking. ask mrs Welsh if She will let her woman mark them for you. I Send your Jacket & overalls Charles coat & two of your Shirts Send me word if the Jacket fits & the overalls—and Send a waistcoat that fits you to make one by. let Charles have your white Jacket. I do not think It is worth altering. I Shall have an other Nankeen made for you—I...
ever Since your last Letter to the president I have had a great inclination to address a Letter to mr vanderkamp and being now confined to my chamber by an attack of the Reumatism, I find a leisure hour to address my Friend in his Solitute In the first place, I assure him I have not any pretentions to the Character of a Learned Lady, and very therefore according to his creed intitled to his...
I yesterday received your Letter from Annapolis of May 8th. I congratulate you my dear Sir, that altho the clouds have been darkned round you, and altho You have experienced by death the loss of kind and worthey Friends, others are rising up to Supply their place. the opening now which presents itself, is Such as may give you Sanguine hopes & Light prospect. I sincerely wish they may be...
Letter not found. 1817. Offered for sale by William R. Benjamin in The Collector: A Magazine for Autograph and Historical Collectors , Catalogue No. 168 (1902), 115. Described as a two-page autograph letter, signed, with the following extract: “Speaks of his article on Madison’s administration. ‘It constitutes a brief and conclusive vindication of yourself and your cabinet from the charges so...
16Memorandum Books, 1817 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 1. Inclosed to Nichs. G. Dufief 50.D. to pay the 31.D. ante June 8. which Mr. Gibson did not remit and to pay for books lately ordered. 6. Deliverd. E. Bacon 65.D. to pay Isaac Hardin for 65. bush. of rye. Borrowed of E. Bacon 145.D. 11. Paid Rowland Goodman 55.D. on account. 14. Assumed to pay in Apr. or May to O. Callis’s estate 144.90 D. due to them from Mrs. Marks: also the taxes on...
D  C 1817. Jan. 6. rec d 95.48 June 6. 5. mo. int. 2.49 97.97 pd money from Fitz . 20. May 15. ord. Southall   25.  
Being appointed a committee of the NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY (instituted in the year 1804) for the collection of Manuscripts and scarce Books, relating to the History of this Country, and hoping that it may be in your power to aid our researches, and to contribute to our collection, we beg leave to subjoin an extract from the first Report of the Society, which will explain the object. It is...
We come, Sir, on behalf of the Citizens of Washington, to mingle our congratulations with our regrets at your political retirement; congratulations that spring from our participation as Americans in the untarnished glory that accompanies you—regrets that flow from feelings alive to the loss we are so soon to experience. At this event, as Citizens of a great community, we feel a pride only...
I am much indebted to the Citizens of Washington, in whose behalf you speak, for the expressions of regard and respect addressed to me. These sentiments are the more valuable to me, as my long residence among them has made me well acquainted with their many titles to my esteem, at the same time that it has enabled them to mark more particularly the course of my public and personal conduct....
The magnificent spectacle which a voluntary retirement from the most exalted station, furnishes, is this day exemplified in you. Elevated by the suffrages of a free people to the highest office in their gift, the termination of the constitutional term found you in possession of their unabated confidence, which they expressed by a repetition of their will that you should continue to preside...
Give me leave to Congratulate you on the success of your Administration, and to accept of my best wishes for your present & futer Happiness, being well persuaded you retire from the cares of State with the full approbation of your own consience. Presumeing you may have some moments of lieusure, let me draw your attention to a class of men who have supported the measures of Goverment dureing 10...
I have committed to the Care of my young Friend M r Todd a small Present of which I must solicit your Acceptance not from any intrinsic Value in the thing itself, but as an Expression of my grateful, respectful and affectionate Recollection. It is a walking-Stick which appears to be of Tortoise shell but it is in Fact only that Substance moulded over a hickory Rod by a simple but ingenious...
M r Colclaser , the Miller at Shadwell , who is equally concern’d with me in that business, has received an advantageous offer from M r Philip Payne to superintend a Mill which he has lately erected on the waters of Roanoke , and wishes to be inform’d immediately, if he will accept it.— In consequence thereof he applied to me yesterday to know my intentions respecting Shadwell Mill ; but as...
Permit me, in the name of the Soci Connecticut Society for the encouragement of A merican Manufactures, to enclose to you their Address and Constitution. RC ( CSmH: JF-BA ); addressed: “The Hon, Thomas Jefferson, Monticello, Virginia”; franked; postmarked; endorsed by TJ as received 20 Mar. 1817 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Address of the Connecticut Society for the Encouragement of...
I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes; or by my agent there,...
I have the satisfaction to inform you that John Quincy Adams Esq. was this morning nominated Secretary of State, and forthwith agreed to, in Senate, with only one dissenting vote—Mr Crawford continues in the Treasury and Gov Shelby is appointed Secy of War;—Mrs: Otis unites with me in respects to Mrs. Adams and yourself, and hope you have experienced no material inconvenience from the rigour...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Colman with his thanks for the “Century Sermon,[”] he has been so good as to inclose with his letter of the 21st. Ult. Mrs. Madison is equally thankful for the Copy of Mr. Buckminster’s Sermons presented to her. Neither of us can at present avail ourselves of the pleasure of perusing the publications: but a very short time will relieve us both from the...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
By the ship Heroine Capt Smith for Boston , I have address’d to the care of mr. Dearborn , the collector, a bag containing about half a bushel of Lupinella grass-seed; requesting he would give it, the earliest conveyance to you.—it was my intention, to have sent it by a vessel bound to one of the southern ports, but having chang’d her destination for another part of Europe , I am compell’d to...