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From the tenderness of Friendship and the Weakness of Compassion and humanity, I have promised two Gentlemen to mention their names to you, as Candidates for Mr Daltons late Office, Captain Tucker and Mr Deblois. A Friendship of forty Years with the former, and of fifty Six years with Mr Dalton have deeply interested my Feelings in behalf of both these Gentlemen. But what Signify Feelings when...
From the tenderness of friendship, & the weakness of compassion & humanity, I have promised two gentlemen to mention their names to you as Candidates for mr Daltons late office. Captain Tucker and mr Deblois. A friendship of 40 years with the former & of 56 years with the mr Dalton have deeply interested my feelings in behalf of both these gentlemen. But what signifies feelings when I know...
Another application has been made to me by Mr Elbridge Gerry, the oldest Son of the late Vice President, for a recommendation to the office of Surveyor in Boston. How can I recollect, the laborious Services, the great Sacrifices of a Gerry for forty years, and the destitute Circumstances of his Widow and Children, without Emotion. I told him I had mentioned the Names of Tucker and Deblois;...
In the good old English Language of your Virginian and my New England Ancestors, I am right glad to See you in the oldest Plantation, in old Massachusetts, next to Salem, where you will be recd with more Splendor and I hope with equal Cordiallity. MHi : Elizabeth Smith Scrapbook; Smith-Townsend Family Papers.
I should ask leave without scruple to transmit the enclosed letter to you were it not for the foolish compliment in it to my pretended influence, which you know to be unfounded & therefore may pass over with a smile. I do not hesitate to comply with his request, by enclosing a copy of a letter, I wrote to Mr Madison, on the 2nd. February 1813 nor scruple to say that no opinion or sentiment in...
For the last twenty years I have made it a rule to interfere as little as possible with public affairs. but an occation now presents in which I think it my duty to make a frank, a Candid, a Submissive representation to you—if the Treaty with Spain returns ratifyed there will be commissioners appointed to adjust the claims for Spoilations on our Commerce—there is a Gentleman who I recommend to...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic effluvia of blossoms and roses to Such a degree as to deprive me of the Sight of letters and the feeling of a pen: I Should have long Since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the thirteenth of the month. It is perfectly Satisfactory to me, and it ought to be So and I presume will be So to Dr Waterhouse. I am hapy to hear that your heal t...
Will you please to accept a morsel of rusty Antiquity, which I know you cannot and ought not to be read, because your time is imperiously demanded for occupations more important to your Country and Mankind, as well as to yourself. Your learned, and Ingenious Son-in Law Mr Hay, may possibly have a curiosity to look into it—to him I pray you to present my Respectful Complements.— And believe me...
I ought not o have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the Journal of the Federal Convention which attended it—The Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the Venerable Characters who composed it—much anxiety, debate, and difficulty—But a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands resulted in the—“preclarum singulare quiet”—which we...
I ought not to have delaid an acknowledgement of your favour of February 20th. and the Volume of the journal of the Federal Constitution Convention which attended it—the Volume shows that our present inestimable Constitution cost the venerable Characters—who composed it—much anxiety and debate and but a Candid and liberal disposition on all hands, resulted in the “preclarum singulare...
Of the multitude of applications to me for Letters of Introduction and recommendation to the President and Heads of departments, in favour of candidates for Office, I have for a long time Sternly, and Sometimes almost cinically refused them all. But the enclosed letter from Dr Waterhouse has so tenderly affected me that I cannot resist my feelings and Inclination to transmit it to you. I...
Had I not been poisoned by the mephytic iffluvia of blossoms and roses to such a degree as to deprive me of the right of letters and the feeling of a pen: I should have long since acknowledged the honour of your obliging letter of the 13th of the month. it is perfectly satisfactory to me and it ought to be so and I presume will be so to Dr Waterhouse. I am happy to hear that your health is...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor and his Lady. This Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge, and one of the most conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson, and is highly esteemed by him. I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison he proposes to visit Montpelier as well as Montecello in the...
Permit me to introduce to you Mr Ticknor & his Lady, this Gentleman is a Professor at our University in Cambridge and one of the most Conspicuous Literary Characters in this State, he has been for several years intimately acquainted with Mr Jefferson and is highly esteemed by him I believe he has been acquainted with Mr Madison, & he proposes to visit him Montpelier as well as well as...
At the risk of incurring the anger of my husband, and under the apprehension of your displeasure; I am obliged by the ties of nature which are more powerful than either of these circumstances however painful, to solicit your aid and compassion for my Sister, whose situation fills me with alarm and dread. Mr: Boyd who was formerly at the head of the wa Pension Office, in a moment of anguish at...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
Your favor of July 27. from Plattsburg was duly received, and I am very glad to learn from it, that the fatiguing scenes through which you have passed, had not prevented some improvement in your health. The sequel of your journey will have been still more friendly to it, as affording a larger proportion of the salutary part of your exercise. I hope you will find an ample reward for all the...
Your favor of the 18th. was handed to me by your servant, at a moment & place which did not permit me to acknowlege it by him. We regretted very much the circumstances which deprived us of the expected pleasure of seeing you all on your way to Washington. I inclose the copy of your letter to Gen: Jackson. Your reasonings on the singular step taken by him can scarcely fail to convince him of...
Your favor of the 24th has just been recd. I am fully aware of the load of business on your hands, preparatory to the meeting of Congress. The course you mean to take in relation to roads & Canals, appears to be best adapted to the posture in which you find the case. A reluctance has generally been felt, to include amendments to the Constitution among Executive recommendations to Congress, but...
The mail of saturday brought me the Copy of your message. It is a fine landscape of our situation, and can not fail to give pleasure at home, and command respect abroad. The recommendation of the repeal of taxes is happily shaped; so also the introduction of the subject of amending the Constitution. The only questions which occur, relate to the proposed suppression of the establishment at...
Your favor of the 22d. has been duly recd. I am so much aware that you have not a moment to spare from your public duties, that I insist on your never answering my letters out of mere civility. This rule I hope will be applied to the present as well as future letters. My quere as to the expedition agst. Amelia Island turned solely on the applicability of the Executive Power to such a case....
I have recd. your favor of the 13th. I beg that you will not think of the pecuniary subject till it be in every respect, perfectly convenient to you. The real sense of the nation with regard to the Revolutionary struggle in S. America can not, I should suppose, be mistaken. Good wishes for its success, and every lawful manifestation of them, will be approved by all, whatever may be the...
I find that Mr. H. Carroll, son of Charles Carroll, who brought over the Treaty of Ghent, is very desirous, as is his father, that he should be appointed to a land office on the Missouri. You are so well acquainted with the worth of the latter both as a man and a patriot, and probably also with the character of the son, that I ought perhaps on that account alone to forbear saying a word on the...
I have just been favored with yours of the 18th. inclosing the Moscow document. I had previously recd. that written on your setting out for Loudon. The Russian paper accounts for the confident tone of Spain towards the U. S.; and throws light on the equivocal conduct of G. B. in relation to Spanish America. It corroborates, at the same time the circumspect policy observed by the Govt. of the...
On my arrival here last evening I learnt that you had reachd home the day before yesterday. I am sorry I could not have the pleasure of seeing you at Montpellier on your way, And the regret is increased by the circumstances which prevent me from making the detour necessary to call on you. I left my mother much indisposed, and my sister Rose who was on a visit to her critically ill; and having...
I have duly recd. yours of the 27th. Ulto. I am very sorry that I shall not be able to have the pleasure of joining you at the Meeting of the Visitors. We must await therefore that of seeing you & Mrs. M. on your way to Washington; and hope you will set out in time to spare us some days. The communications from Mr. Rush are very interesting. G. B. seems so anxious to secure the general trade...
I thank you for the “Message” put under cover to me. The topics which it embraces are well presented to public attention. None of the Documents have reached us. Those relating to S. America, are I find objects of much curiosity. The inference you draw from them, leaves no doubt however as to their general complexion. I can not learn the precise state of Mr. Jefferson’s convalescence. I fear it...
Your favor of the 23d. having passed on to Milton whence it came back to Orange Court House I did not receive it till yesterday. I am glad to find that our proportion of Shipping in the direct trade with G. B. is encreasing. It must continue to do so under an established reciprocity—with regard to the trade of the B. Colonies, whether that be founded on the admission or exclusion of the Ships...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
I recd. by the last mail your favor of the 7th. The death of Genl. Mason with the manner of it is an event truly lamentable. The only alleviation it admits is in the hope that its admonitions will not be fruitless. The Newspapers from Washington not having come to hand regularly of late, and other matters having engaged my attention, I am but partially acquainted with what has passed in...
Mr. Ths. Lehré of S. C. is a candidate for the vacant Collectorship of Charleston, and writes that I shd bear some testimony to you in favor of his pretensions. Not having any personal knowlege of him this can relate only to his political sentiments and conduct as they were from time to time communi[ca]ted to me, and to the general standing which I have understood him to possess with his...
The best use I can make of the inclosed letter from Mr. Scott is to give you a perusal of its contents—after which you will be so good as to return it. The letter itself is a proof of his good sense, and literary education; and those inclosed in it are good vouchers for the other features of his character. In addition to other motives for wishing employment, it is very natural for him to be...
The day after you left us I recd. a letter from Mr R. B Lee which I inclose. It contains a fuller view of circumstances which it may not be amiss you should understand, than may be otherwise conveyed. I shall simply state in answer that I believe your personal dispositions will be no bar to whatever may be permitted by considerations of a public nature. Be so good as to return the letter under...
Capt: OBrien having extended a ride into Virga. thus far, has during his stay with me, communicated the State of a Claim he has agst. the U. S., being part of a claim, the other part of which was settled & allowed whilst I was Secretary of State. I understand from him that the vouchers to the settled part had certain references to the part not allowed, and that he afterwards procured...
Mr. Stone of Fredg. whom you well know informs me that his son in law Chs. H. Smith of Norfolk, is a candidate for the paymastership vacated by the death of Majr. Opie; and he is anxious that I shd drop you on the subject. Notwithstanding my repugnance to do so, which is encreased by the reason I have for believing your knowlege of Mr. Smith to be equal to mine, I can not entirely disregard...
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
Mr. Hackly called on me a few days ago on his way to Washington. I found him very intelligent and of agreable manners. He observed a commendable delicacy in the part of his Conversation, which touched his personal hopes from the Government; but it was not concealed that he aspired to some provision under its patronage. He will doubtless be if he has not already been, more explicit and...
I have duly recd. your favor of the 5th. followed by a copy of the public documents; for which I give you many thanks. I should like to get a copy of the Journals of the Convention. Are they to be purchased & where? It appears to me, as it does to you, that a coupling of Missouri with Maine, in order to force the entrance of the former thro’ the door voluntarily opened for the latter is, to...
I received yours of the 19th. on Monday. Genl. Brown, who returned from Monticello on that evening, has been since with me, till 10 OClock today. Your letter found me indisposed from exposure to a cold wind without due precaution; and I have continued so. I write now with a fever on me. These circumstances will account for both the delay & the brevity in complying with your request. The pinch...
My nephew R L. Madison has turned his thoughts to the new acquisition expected from Spain on our S. Frontier, and wishes an official situation there which may be convenient for the time and improve his future prospects for a growing family. The reluctance I feel in speaking on all such occasions is heightened on this by the personal relation which may be supposed to bias me. Leaving to other...
Whilst I was in the Government at Washington, Henry Sidney Coxe, a son of Mr. Tench Coxe, was appointed a Midshipman. On the return of peace, ill health, brought on by the severities of the service, and the advice of his father prevailed on him to retire. His father states that his health is now re-established, and that his attachment to the navy having never ceased, it is the wish of both,...
Mr. Governeur gave us to understand that we should have the pleasure of seeing you & Mrs. Monroe about the first or second week in Sepr. Be so good as to drop a line saying as nearly as you can the precise time. Mrs. M. & myself have a little visit to make in the neighbourhood, which can be executed with equal conveniency a little sooner or later, and which we shall hasten or delay, so as to...
I have just recd. a letter from Chs. D. Coxe, appealing to my recollection on certain points, and requesting a line from me to yourself. To let you see what has passed, I inclose his letter to me, and a copy of my answer. The former you will be so good as to return. I presume the views of the case to be gathered from authentic sources will readily decide the question of his actual official...
Yesterday’s mail brought me your favor of the 16th. with a Copy of your message: the only one reaching me; no newspaper containing it having come to hand. The view you have taken of our affairs can not but be well received at home, and increase our importance abroad. The State of our finances is the more gratifying as it so far exceeds the public hopes. I infer from the language of your letter...
I have recd. your two favors of the 18 & 23 inst. The prospect of a favorable issue to the difficulties with Spain, is very agreeable. I hope the ratification will arrive witht clogs on it; and that the acquisition of Florida may give no new stimulus to the spirit excited by the case of Missouri. I am glad to learn that a termination of this case also is not despaired of. If the new State is...
Mr. Hackley called on me a few days ago on his way to Washington. I found him very intelligent and of agreeable manners. He observed a commendable delicacy in the part of his conversation, which touched his personal hopes from the Government; but it was not concealed that he aspired to some provision under its patronage. He will doubtless be, if he has not already been, more explicit &...
I congratulate you most heartily on the happy close to the first period of your public trust, and on the very conspicuous result which introduces you to the second. One of your successful measures is of course bringing on you the irksome task of making selections from a crowd of candidates. On this list is I find Mr. A. Scott, who has again appealed to the motives which on other occasions drew...
I have recd. your favor of the 31. ult. The retrospective claim for Newspapers has been made on me, in one instance only, since I was out of office. A printer in Vermont sent me a charge for a weekly paper during my term of 8 years, several years after I was out of office. I answered that I had never subscribed for the paper, and had always supposed it to have been forwarded without pecuniary...
I observe that Genl. A. Moore has resigned the office of Marshall for Virga. I know not who may be candidates for the vacancy. I beg leave to name for your consideration Mr. Robert Taylor of this County, formerly a Speaker of our Senate, & of a character well established for intelligence, proberty [ sic ], and habits of punctuality in business. I am particularly induced to bring him into view...
I am just informed by Mr. F. Corbin, that E. Randolph, who held a Commission in the late Army, is desirous of the Collectorship at Pensacola, at which place he had established himself, in anticipation of its becoming a port of the U.S. As his military appointment originated in my nomination, and it was so well justified by his distinguished gallantry on several important occasions, it seems to...