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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
It is really afflicting to hear that you are again subjected to painful illness and to observe in your letters a depression and melancholy which are not natural to your character and which are I fear gaining ground over you. I do not think with those who attribute your indisposition to the election, although the scandalous persecution to which my Father has been subjected and the unblushing...
Ever since the middle of the last month we have been in such a succession of events and interruptions that the time has slipped away with out a moments reflection on the interval between this letter and my last. On the 15th. of June General La Fayette came and his arrival was the signal for dinners parties and shows. You ask for a description of the 17th. of June. It has not been attempted...
I thank you for your affectionate remembrance of my birthday—We passed it as pleasantly as circumstances would admit at Mr Frye’s; but I was not very well that day and was more than usually overpowered by the heat—On returning home too we were caught in a thunder–shower and throughly drenched. The Metropolis is daily thinning off—The Secretary of the Navy and family are gone—The President goes...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
I have received your Letters of the 13th. and 14th from Lebanon, and rejoice with exceeding joy at the recovery of your health—From other Letters received here I learn that you intended to remain at Lebanon, only a very few days, and I scarcely know whether this will find you there My Letter of the 17th. which I hope you will receive this day will inform you of Mr Boyleston’s affectionate...
I write you without knowing where or when my Letter will find you, and must therefore I must omit much of what I wish to say to you—I received this Morning your Letter of the 21st. (Monday) from Lebanon, and its enclosure I suppose of the same day—but it was post marked Northampton the 23d—It is evident that when you wrote it, you had not received my Letter of the 17th. proposing to meet you...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
No Journal received this day—But there was one yesterday, and I hope for one to-morrow—We have had now a week of heat as oppressive as any of the whole Summer, and two or three of the Nights have been more so. Though I have no doubt, you find it equally insupportable at Philadelphia, it reconciles me to your stay there; because I would have you come home to a temperate climate, as well as to...