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Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
A long period has elapsed since I addrest a line to you—I have not taken my pen for three weeks—I have been so constantly occupied with my visitors, and a sick domestic, who has been near dieing with a Billious fever the whole time my Friends were with me, that I could not find a leisure moment. mr & mrs DeWint his Mother their children and servants left us last week, about the time when...
My correspondence has been much interrupted the last fortnight Susan has been So feeble and weak, that She has required much care and attention She is now but just able to leave her Chamber, and that only for a short time, and we have had ten days of dismal wet weather, in which the Sun has not once Shone,—it has produced much Sickness, of the Quincy and Croup kind, with Children—My Son T B As...
I received yesterday your journal to the 21st of Jan’ry. Washington Seems to be in a whirpool of dissipation—well described by Scott in his tales of my Landlord—“a chase through Life, after follies not worth catching; and when caught successively thrown away; a chase pursued from days of tottering infancy to old Age—Toys and merry makings in Childhood, Love and its absurdities in youth....
I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
I this morning received Your Second Letter, by way of journal. we have all been highly entertaind. it makes me a Sharer with you, in your various occupations—brings me acquainted with Characters, and places me at your fire Side. one Single Letter conveys more information in this way, than I could obtain in a whole Session of Congress.—I hope you will continue this method altho you will receive...
you will I know excuse my not haveing written to you more than once; when you learn the additional care and anxiety I have had in my Family by the Sickness of Louisa, who has had two other allarming attacks of pukeing blood, more than half a pint each time, and a much larger quantity passing down. She is much reduced, and for several days unable to leave her Bed—She is now able to sit up...
I have been haunted with the Deamon of omission, and a hundred Sprights in the garb of excuses, Such as Company, family avocations Noisy Boys &c &c This morning, being very Stormy, I determined to expel them all, and commence writing a Letter to you. I beleive I had promised to write to my Son. I know that he must be so enveloped in publick Buisness, that he can ill afford time to attend to...
I received your Letter of March 2d which has increased my anxiety to hear again from you, for a series of misfortunes Seem to have clustered around you. pray inform me how mrs Frye her Husband and Children are? I scarcly expect to hear the last are living. what a Scene you had to pass through? I do not wonder you were Sick—That Erysipelas which has Several times troubled you, is a very...
The Children Say that they have your permission to come to Town to dine with Commodore Hull—and to Stay untill Saturday to visit the Carval I have accordingly let them take the Stage this morning—I think they had better accept mrs Fosters invitation & Lodge there, but that as you judge best; mrs Adams will be calld home, Elizabeth being again very sick—I hope to See you in Town tomorrow— yours...
I received your very kind Letter, in which you take so great interest in my health, that I am bound to say much of myself in return; for I have profited by your admonitions and those of my other Friends.In the first place, I indulge myself in the morning, and seldom rise before the sun I use no more exercise than I think my health requires—altho I frequently hear, o do not go there, do not do...
I have not yet acknowledged your favour of June 27th I go so seldom into the buisy world, that I can get little to amuse or entertain you with. Harriet too is yet with her Sister. She always had something of foreign or domestic to amuse us with—I miss her much, and that upon the Childrens account, as well as my own—The fourth of July has past with much Eclat, and good humour in Boston, with an...
I heard of you at Providence from mr Fearno , and I was yesterday informd that the News paper reported your arrival at N york on Saturday. I hope tomorrows Mail will give me Some direct intelligence as the two or three first days of your journey the weather was very oppressive, I fear you must have endured great fatigue. By this time I hope you are compensated for it, by the happy meeting of...
Since the 18th July, I have not received a Line from you or my Son, altho I have been in daily expectation of hearing that you were sitting your faces this way. I have learnt from mr Cruft that mr Adams contemplated being here, as I understood him by the last of this Month, or sooner if he could. The intercourse between us, is not so frequent as I could wish. Even tho it consisted of “How do...
You will by this time (I hope), have obtained some days of rest after the fatigue of your journey. I have been extremely afraid of the effect of it upon you before you started but am in hopes now that the change once obtained will be of some service. How long you will remain under the present circumstances, I am unable to guess but I should scarcely imagine that a sudden return however...
This extraordinary season has prevented all ideas of regular correspondence for few employments are so irksome as writing when the thermometer stands at 100, but it is so agreeable to receive letters from home that one endeavours to seize every opportunity to obtain them. Grandfather has been favoured lately with a visit from his highness the Duke of Saxe Weimar, a gentleman who intends soon...
Your excellent letter to me arrived at the close of the last week and was brought to me by John from Boston: The hasty letter written to my Father on the morning of the 5th. to announce the melancholy event of the preceding day was followed by so many others to different persons of your family at Washington that I was not anxious concerning the transmission of regular information to you from...
The heated and violent temper of the public upon the question of politics renders it necessary to keep individual feelings cautiously in check but this is not always possible. The low spirits indicated by your last letter to me and subsequently by the one to Mr Cruft have affected me more than any thing which is going on without. The atrocious application of the story of Mrs Moulton to the...
Let me express to you my gratitude for your last note on reading which I had a foretaste of the suffering I should have undergone had the dreadful rumour you mentioned preceded it. I most heartily thank God that my Father was saved to you, to his children, to his country. The idea of his loss is too terrible to think of and at the time when your note arrived; not having recovered a calm tone...
By Marys last letter I am told that you are still suffering from illness and Harriet Welsh understood from Mr Smith in New York that St Anthony had tormented you more than usually for some time. This disorder seems to have become very prevalent in this country and Mrs Welsh suffers so much from it that she is compelled to remain constantly at home. Grandfather had it pretty severely last...
A most unpleasant journey was completed by our arrival at Quincy last week where we had the satisfaction of finding grandfather in better health and more comfortable than when we had last seen him. Two days afterwards Charles left us and returned to Cambridge anticipating much pleasure from the remaining months of his residence there but a little afflicted by the assignment of a part to him...
It is really afflicting to hear that you are again subjected to painful illness and to observe in your letters a depression and melancholy which are not natural to your character and which are I fear gaining ground over you. I do not think with those who attribute your indisposition to the election, although the scandalous persecution to which my Father has been subjected and the unblushing...
Ever since the middle of the last month we have been in such a succession of events and interruptions that the time has slipped away with out a moments reflection on the interval between this letter and my last. On the 15th. of June General La Fayette came and his arrival was the signal for dinners parties and shows. You ask for a description of the 17th. of June. It has not been attempted...
It was painful to hear that you had been so ill after arriving at Washington and astonishing that people tell you you have changed for the worse. This is not a thing to mortify you as you have been always superior to dependence upon mere looks but it has always struck me as a disagreeable and not infrequently an ill natured remark to tell people that they have changed for the worse. It is...
It is pleasant to be able to inform you that Grandfathers health rather improves than declines. He has gone comfortably through the month of February and is now better than he has been for some time past. The family at Quincy are well. Mr Cutler, the Episcopal Clergyman there seems to have made sad havoc with poor Susans intellect. She is very enthusiastic and the religious fervor grows rather...
Your letter of the 1st. instant has affected me deeply: it was received this morning and afforded me more real pleasure perhaps than any you have ever addressed to me. Your style in writing is known to be that of the most animated conversation but in this instance it seems to obliterate the ideas of time and distance and to bring me near to you not in the mood of mortified affection and...
Just this moment opening my shutters I find the ground covered with snow and it lays apparently somewhat deep. We have had a number of little drizzles as the parson called them but this is the first real snow storm of the season. Yesterday was very disagreeable: a very light snow was falling all day but not enough to accumulate much, and the air was exceedingly sharp and piercing. The...
I have received your journal for the two first days of this month and shall as you permit read parts of it to my Grandfather. He has consented to give me all your preceding journals which are to be delivered to me next week. He thinks this the most proper disposition which could be made of them as he does not wish them liable to any view but those which you may voluntarily grant. I shall...
This day two hundred years our adventurous Ancestors landed at Plymouth—and two years hence will compete two hundred years since a more jolly company of them landed at Mount Wollaston—I have been made an honourary member of the new Plymouth Institution, and have been urged with warm invitations to go and Celebrate the day, and hear the Oratory of Mr Webster which I doubt not will be...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature a germ of superstition, which has cost mankind very dear, and there is an other germ the love of finery, and which has done almost as much harm, and both have been employed with great sagacity by temperal and spiritual politicians to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature, a germe of superstition which has cost mankind very dear; And there is another germe, the love of finery, And which has done almost as much harm, And both have been employed with great sagacity by temporal, and spiritual politicians, to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Last night I received and read your lovely Letter of the 11th: As the three Cantabridgeans were here—they and I and all the family Uncle Aunt and Cousins all enjoyed the Luxury of it at Supper. It made a great impression on all of Us, especially upon George who with great dignity enjoined it upon his Brothers to lay the contents of it to heart. We all rejoice in the hope of seeing you in July...
As I consider y’r ladyship as always imprison’d during a session of Congress I congratulate you upon y’r jail delivery by their rise they have not been very angry during this session consequently not very entertaining—our two sons arrived here in good health & spirits at the proper season and a furious snow wh’ blocked up all the roads detain’d them here for three or four days and enliven’d my...
I have to thank you for two amiable letters—the last is of too great importance for me to answer, to your satisfaction, or my own—I am myself too much under the influence of prejudices to have ever, have, reproached you seriously with yours. —As long as association of ideas and feelings and the consequent power of habit shall be a constituent part of the constitution of human nature; so long...
Mr Henry Warren, a Son of your late friend Dr John Warren—and a young lawyer of promising hopes is a bout to travel to Washington—and will have the honour to deliver you this letter—I hope you will receive him with the utmost cordiality, for his Name and Blood are very dear to me The last news we have from your Sons—was their visit to Mr Boyleston last Saturday—In fine health and Spirits—to...
one week more will effectually relieve you from your ennui which perhaps may be succeeded by fatigues more difficult to bear—if not more dangerous to Health— Kings of England when they have wished to carry some great point with Parliament, have informed that Assembly that the Eyes of all Europe were upon them it—and it may be safely said that the eyes of all Europe, and of all America North...
Your Journal beginning the third of the month has given me great pleasure. You are much to be envied and much to be pitied; such a variety of good Company is very desirable, but so much cerimoney and such fatigues must be rather burdensome.— We have received this morning the annunciation of Mr. Clays “GREAT UNKNOWN VOLUME OF GHENTISH HISTORY ” It will appear I presume at least as soon as the...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that many Mr Randolph or Roanoke is in a state of insanity—and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr Randolph has appeared through his whole public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengence without cause...
If Nature in scattering her bounties had bestowed upon me the genius of a Poet or a Painter I would entertain you with a description of a scene of sublimity, beauty, and novelty, such as eighty four winters never before presented to my sight: when I arose in the morning, the Sun was rising, the heavens were not of Brass but the Sky was a vast concave of clear blue marble and the earth was of...
As I take a great interest in your pleasures, and your troubles, your last Journal has given me a large share of both—the social scenes are delightful and the prospect of trouble is afflicting—I am interested too in the Journey of our Collegians who came here on Thursday—sett all the Tailors with their Needles in Motion—and on Saturday went to Boston with their Uncle who fitted them off with...
I have received your journal to the third of June—which is entertaining and Instructing as usual— We have reports in circulation here that Mr. Randolph of Roanoke is in a state of insanity, and many say he is confined—I wish to know the truth—for although Mr. Randolph has appeared through his whole Public life to be possessed of a Demoniacal Spirit of Malice and Vengeance without cause against...
Your journal to the 21st. ult—has given me much amusement and much pleasure I want to touch upon twenty things but that number is too great. The Missouri question is the most magnificent and portentous. I have no doubt of the right of Congress to stop the progress of Slavery, and if I were disposed to give you my reasons I Should think it unnecessary since I have read a review of Judge Story &...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
your journals grow more and more entertaining and instructive—you ask my Opinion of General Jackson—and you shall have it—Hero and a Conqueror I cannot say that he has transgressed the Law of Nations in any one point—certainly neither Spain nor England has any right to complain; if he has transgressed any punctilios of the Constitution neither Spain nor England have anything to do with...
I have received yours of the 3d.—I can only say if Susan will return to me with her Child and live in my complicated Family—she will be welcome to my heart—I will protect her at all hazards, as long as I live, and I will keep peace in my house, as long as I shall have the means, and the power—she must return to me, and there must not and shall not be family bickerings— Your Children have given...
I thank you for your journals and pray you to continue them for they are a refreshing amusement to me in my desolation and solitude for such is my real condition through your three Sons visit me commonly once a week and cheer my drooping spirits and although my neighbours and friends are universally kind to me and solace my sorrows as much as they can and what is much more even my enemies seem...