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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
Results 11-20 of 156 sorted by author
you will I know excuse my not haveing written to you more than once; when you learn the additional care and anxiety I have had in my Family by the Sickness of Louisa, who has had two other allarming attacks of pukeing blood, more than half a pint each time, and a much larger quantity passing down. She is much reduced, and for several days unable to leave her Bed—She is now able to sit up...
I have been haunted with the Deamon of omission, and a hundred Sprights in the garb of excuses, Such as Company, family avocations Noisy Boys &c &c This morning, being very Stormy, I determined to expel them all, and commence writing a Letter to you. I beleive I had promised to write to my Son. I know that he must be so enveloped in publick Buisness, that he can ill afford time to attend to...
I received your Letter of March 2d which has increased my anxiety to hear again from you, for a series of misfortunes Seem to have clustered around you. pray inform me how mrs Frye her Husband and Children are? I scarcly expect to hear the last are living. what a Scene you had to pass through? I do not wonder you were Sick—That Erysipelas which has Several times troubled you, is a very...
The Children Say that they have your permission to come to Town to dine with Commodore Hull—and to Stay untill Saturday to visit the Carval I have accordingly let them take the Stage this morning—I think they had better accept mrs Fosters invitation & Lodge there, but that as you judge best; mrs Adams will be calld home, Elizabeth being again very sick—I hope to See you in Town tomorrow— yours...
I received your very kind Letter, in which you take so great interest in my health, that I am bound to say much of myself in return; for I have profited by your admonitions and those of my other Friends.In the first place, I indulge myself in the morning, and seldom rise before the sun I use no more exercise than I think my health requires—altho I frequently hear, o do not go there, do not do...
I have not yet acknowledged your favour of June 27th I go so seldom into the buisy world, that I can get little to amuse or entertain you with. Harriet too is yet with her Sister. She always had something of foreign or domestic to amuse us with—I miss her much, and that upon the Childrens account, as well as my own—The fourth of July has past with much Eclat, and good humour in Boston, with an...
I heard of you at Providence from mr Fearno , and I was yesterday informd that the News paper reported your arrival at N york on Saturday. I hope tomorrows Mail will give me Some direct intelligence as the two or three first days of your journey the weather was very oppressive, I fear you must have endured great fatigue. By this time I hope you are compensated for it, by the happy meeting of...
Since the 18th July, I have not received a Line from you or my Son, altho I have been in daily expectation of hearing that you were sitting your faces this way. I have learnt from mr Cruft that mr Adams contemplated being here, as I understood him by the last of this Month, or sooner if he could. The intercourse between us, is not so frequent as I could wish. Even tho it consisted of “How do...
You will by this time (I hope), have obtained some days of rest after the fatigue of your journey. I have been extremely afraid of the effect of it upon you before you started but am in hopes now that the change once obtained will be of some service. How long you will remain under the present circumstances, I am unable to guess but I should scarcely imagine that a sudden return however...
This extraordinary season has prevented all ideas of regular correspondence for few employments are so irksome as writing when the thermometer stands at 100, but it is so agreeable to receive letters from home that one endeavours to seize every opportunity to obtain them. Grandfather has been favoured lately with a visit from his highness the Duke of Saxe Weimar, a gentleman who intends soon...