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I intended before this time to have acknowledged the reciept of your kind letter It was extremely interesting to me No one could have a better idea of the pleasure afforded by a minute account of the situation of friends than yourself, who have been so much seperated from them persons who have never like you and and myself resided in foreign countries can form very little idea of how much the...
Your journalizing Letters, my dearest friend, from the 18th. to the 23d. have been received—And are most of all welcome, for assuring me of your continued convalescence; and of the benefit you are deriving from the waters—In your Letter of the 22d. Tuesday, you ask that the Carriage should set out next Tuesday, to meet you at Hagerstown—But on the next day you speak of passing another week ,...
Since Johnson Hellen departed, last Sunday, I have been moping in Solitude; but the day after he went away, I was made light-hearted by the receipt of your two Letters of the 9th. and 11th. instt. which came together—I suppose Johnson is by this time with you; but I dont know whether that will stimulate or dispel John’s home sickness—The week from the time when you left me, was one of the...
The day after your departure, Johnson Hellen came down from Rockville, and has been a pleasant companion to me till now. I rejoiced to learn from him that you had not suffered by the heavy rain that came on before you reached Rockville; and that you had proceeded to next Morning in health and good Spirits towards Frederick. But nine days have since passed away, and I have not a line either...
Allow Me To present To you Mr Steuart Wortley, and Mr Stanly—They are Gentlemen of high rank, who are visiting America, and are anxious not To run through The County, but To become acquainted with our Society;—and I cannot with The pride of An American resist The gratification of Making Them known To Mr Adams, and yourself—Wortley is the Nephew of Lord Bristol, and Ld Liverpool—Mr Stanley of...
By Marys last letter I am told that you are still suffering from illness and Harriet Welsh understood from Mr Smith in New York that St Anthony had tormented you more than usually for some time. This disorder seems to have become very prevalent in this country and Mrs Welsh suffers so much from it that she is compelled to remain constantly at home. Grandfather had it pretty severely last...
It is pleasant to be able to inform you that Grandfathers health rather improves than declines. He has gone comfortably through the month of February and is now better than he has been for some time past. The family at Quincy are well. Mr Cutler, the Episcopal Clergyman there seems to have made sad havoc with poor Susans intellect. She is very enthusiastic and the religious fervor grows rather...
I have received your journal for the two first days of this month and shall as you permit read parts of it to my Grandfather. He has consented to give me all your preceding journals which are to be delivered to me next week. He thinks this the most proper disposition which could be made of them as he does not wish them liable to any view but those which you may voluntarily grant. I shall...
Just this moment opening my shutters I find the ground covered with snow and it lays apparently somewhat deep. We have had a number of little drizzles as the parson called them but this is the first real snow storm of the season. Yesterday was very disagreeable: a very light snow was falling all day but not enough to accumulate much, and the air was exceedingly sharp and piercing. The...
I had the honour to receive your letter, with its’ enclosure for Mrs. Boyd, which was immediately forwarded to its’ destination. It will afford me pleasure at all times to take charge of any letters, you may wish to address to your sister. I beg yor acceptance of a pair of moccasins, valuable only as affording a rare specimen of the delicacy of Indian female work. With great respect, / Madam,...
It was painful to hear that you had been so ill after arriving at Washington and astonishing that people tell you you have changed for the worse. This is not a thing to mortify you as you have been always superior to dependence upon mere looks but it has always struck me as a disagreeable and not infrequently an ill natured remark to tell people that they have changed for the worse. It is...
Anigma by Mr. Canning: There is a word of Plural number, Foe to peace, and tranquil slumber; From , any word you chance to take, By adding S. You plural make; But if to this word , You add an S , Strange is the metamorphosis; Plural is plural, then no more, And Sweet, what bitter was before. Solution— Though bitter
Thanks for your favor of the third—With great pleasure I learn that you are all convalescent, and that your Brother is well and intends us a visit with you—Our John performed his part at the Exhibition with applause and approbation; But something has happened since, that has brought him here, where I wish he could remain, till next August twelve months, but I cannot advise him so, for his...
Your favor of the 16th. is a reviving cordial in which I have languished for a fortnight—But I have to complain, that it is only two days, since I heard since I heard of George’s misfortune. I suppose it has been concealed in tenderness to me, but I wish to hear the worst of bad news from the begining. This tenderness for me has concealed many misfortunes which if they had been communicated to...
Your journal which has become a necessary of life to me has failed me for so a long a time but I must excuse it because it too severe a tax upon you & I hope & presume that George is too deeply absorbed in the studies of his profession to be able to spare time to copy your records. We are here in a newspaper flurry of flickerings for Govenor & they will associate your husband with Mr Otis as...
As I consider y’r ladyship as always imprison’d during a session of Congress I congratulate you upon y’r jail delivery by their rise they have not been very angry during this session consequently not very entertaining—our two sons arrived here in good health & spirits at the proper season and a furious snow wh’ blocked up all the roads detain’d them here for three or four days and enliven’d my...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature, a germe of superstition which has cost mankind very dear; And there is another germe, the love of finery, And which has done almost as much harm, And both have been employed with great sagacity by temporal, and spiritual politicians, to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
Thanks for your Journal of the 26th. There is in human nature a germ of superstition, which has cost mankind very dear, and there is an other germ the love of finery, and which has done almost as much harm, and both have been employed with great sagacity by temperal and spiritual politicians to debase, degrade and subdue mankind, even with their own consent under the cruel iron rod of...
I have received your last Journal, and thank you for it. When the Lady asked you which you prefered, the Illiad, or Paradise lost, you should have answered her as we New-England people do, by asking her another question, pray Madam do you read the Illiad in Greek, or in Pope. I wonder not that you threw your arms round your husband upon reading his answer to General Smyth, I would have done...
Wonderful Woman, wife of a wonderful Man, How it is possible for you with your delicate Constitution and tender Health, to go through such a hurry of Visits, Dinners, and parties, Converse with such a variety, of Characters, masculine, and Feminine, and at the same time keep so particular a Journal. Yours of the 14th of December, up to the 30th. has arrived this Morning. your journal is a kind...
I have received and read your letter with great deference and pleasure; but, of course, without any conviction of error in my opinions, you so ingeniously combat—The truth is the difference between us is marked by such light shades and mingling colours that it is not easy to detect the precise point where it is found—I am well satisfied it will not do, in this day and country, for publick men...
A few days ago there arrived at this port of Philadelphia, in a packet from Alexandria, a certain box, directed to me; which, when opened, was found to contain a very fine head , in excellent order —As no letter accompanied the box, or was received by any other Conveyance, the head was left to speak for itself; and inform from whence it came, and to what it was destined. The recollection of a...
I have received your last Journal and found it entertaining though you seem to think so little of it; I have infinitely less to write to you, Though you seem to think your journal infinitely little, nevertheless as our friend Shaw is with me, and willing to write for me, I will gossip with you a little.— The Newspapers of this part of the World are blazing with republications of Mr. Adams’s...
Your Journal beginning the third of the month has given me great pleasure. You are much to be envied and much to be pitied; such a variety of good Company is very desirable, but so much cerimoney and such fatigues must be rather burdensome.— We have received this morning the annunciation of Mr. Clays “GREAT UNKNOWN VOLUME OF GHENTISH HISTORY ” It will appear I presume at least as soon as the...
With high spirits I received the hand writing and the journal of the 1st. of this Month. I opened gay hopes before me for the Winter I rejoice in the recovery of you health, and to hear of the good health of you all— Mr. Adams, his Lady and Son appear to enjoy a serene and patient tranquility under the pelting of this pitiless Storm of political hail the thunder is not loud, and the Lightning...
We have an interesting question whether by the “middle of the week” which in your Journal of last Saturday you mentioned as the time when you expected to reach home, you intended the middle of this week or of the next—If of the present it is already here; but then your last Journal which is of Tuesday, was written in expectation of hearing from one, which you doubtless did the next Morning. I...
Your Letter and Journal to the 3d. have come to hand. If I should give you the reasons why I cannot go and spend a week at Philadelphia to shew my friends there how much I long to be President, you would think them very ridiculous, and me not less so for detailing them—My friends at Philadelphia, are not the only ones who send me kind messages to inform me that unless I mend my manners, I...
Your last Journals yet received, are of the 23d (last Monday) from Border Town—You were then engaged for Wednesday, at Mrs Lenox’s and I had concluded you would return to Philadelphia on Thursday—Yesterday therefore, and again this day, I was expecting a Letter from you, after your return. But Thursday came on here, what we take for the equinoctial Storm, and it is hardly yet over—If it came...
il m’a été bien pénible Madame de partir sans vous revoir et sans scavoir si Je pouvois vous être bonne à quelque chose sûr cet ancien continent que vous aimez et où l’on aimeroit tant a vous revoir, Je viens donc vous demandez vos commitions qu’il me seroit si agréable de remplir puisque ce seroit un Moyen de me rapeller au Souvenir d’une des personnes que Je regrette le plûs d’avoir quitées...
Your journal of the 16th. 17th. and 18th. from Bordentown was doubly grateful, for being unexpected—I am delighted to learn that you have been passing your time so agreeably; particularly as it was relaxation so necessary to you after so much confinement at Philadelphia. We have been called again to the House of Mourning, and on Friday attended the funeral of Mrs Macomb, at Georgetown. She...
No Journal received this day—But there was one yesterday, and I hope for one to-morrow—We have had now a week of heat as oppressive as any of the whole Summer, and two or three of the Nights have been more so. Though I have no doubt, you find it equally insupportable at Philadelphia, it reconciles me to your stay there; because I would have you come home to a temperate climate, as well as to...
The day before yesterday after an anxious interval of two days without a line from you, brought me your Letter announcing your confinement to your chamber by the visit of that Saint far famed for the success of his Sermons to the fishes. I hope he has not taken offence at my partiality for the fisherman , and resolved to avenge my attachment to them upon you—If Dr Physick can give a final...
Yesterday afternoon at four, we performed the last sad offices of mortality to the remains of Mr. Josiah Meigs—It was but the Sunday week before, that happening accidentally to attend the Morning worship at the second Presbyterian Church I had seen him there ordained a Ruling Elder —He was suddenly seized yesterday was a week, immediately after returning early in the morning from Alexandria,...
Your journals down to the 30th of August inclusive are received; and this day the memoirs of Lord Waldegrave for George—It comes quite apropos; for we are now all enjoying the Memoirs of Horace Walpole embracing the same and a longer period, Lord Holland the Editor of this latter work sent a copy of it most magnificently bound as a present to the President who has been kind enough to lend it...
Joseph has arrived safe with the Carriage and horses. Your journal of the 24th. and 25th. was doubly agreeable, after the interval of suspension, by the good tidings it gave of your brother—May his convalescence prove permanent. I had received a Letter from Mr Connell since his arrival in this Country and a promise of a visit which I am expecting from him—Connell told you of all the writers in...
Instead of four 5 dollar bills, I enclose you a draft, payable to your order , on a Bank in Philadelphia—I am a little shy of entrusting to the Mail Bank Bills payable to the bearer —for they are more apt than all others to make themselves wings and fly away—A draft which will not be paid without your endorsement is safer. We have had a little, but very little rain, and it comes too late to...
All your journals have been duly received, and I should not have failed writing to you for the exception which absorbs all my leisure—When I first began the remarks upon Jonathan’s duplicata , I told you it was to me an affair of more than life and death, and so it is still—The plot has been seven years hatching, and its whole history has not yet been told. Your advice to treat all...
An interval of three days without a Letter from you had me, and I find by your Journal to the 15th. yesterday received that it was not without reason—I hope your health will not suffer by a Summer residence in Philadelphia Mr and Mrs. Smith arrived here, the Evening before last from Pensacola—Johnson Hellen left us on Wednesday Morning to return to Rockville I wrote you last Monday Morning...
Your Journals to the inclusive have been regularly received, and have become a sort of necessary of life to George and me—Whatever the Cause of the Confidence which you say you have but recently acquired of writing to me whatever comes into your head, as I am the principal gainer by the acquisition—hope it will be permanent—Your advice is always acceptable, and if I do not always profit by it,...
Oh! that I could visit Philadelphia! and run about as I did Forty Eight years ago—to Roman Catholic Churches, Quaker meetings Anabaptist Churches, Methodistical Churches, Swedenborgian Churches—and Presbyterian Churches Not one Congregational Church could I find. Nor of a Unitarian Church was the possibility conceived by any one in that City. Tell Mrs Powell however, that I would now visit her...
I enclose you a Letter from Mrs Frye—upon whom I called last Evening—Mr Frye doubts whether he will have it in his power to make his Northern excursion this year—I conclude that even if you go to Quincy, you will not leave Philadelphia, so soon as Thursday and accordingly continue writing to you at that place— I did suffer much for some time from excessive heat—But the cool weather has...
Your Journal of 31st. July and 1st. instt. is received. I enclose you another Check for 100 Dollars, that you may be payable want of funds, if you should finally conclude to go on to Quincy—But besides the doubts which are mentioned in your Letter, arising from the situation of your brother, I have others since I have this day learnt that the yellow fever is in New-York—my fathers invitation...
I continue to receive your journals—that of the 29th. was the last; and they would continue to be most agreeable, if they all gave cheering accounts of your brother—Count de Manon called on me yesterday and told me he had seen your brother last week; and thought he looked not worse but if any thing he thought rather better than he had a fortnight before. Tuesday Evening we had a party at Dr...
Your journal of the 24th. and 25th. has been received—The complaint of cold, and the want of winter Clothes, almost makes me stare; though even here we have had two or three more moderate days— I give you an extract of a Letter which I have this morning from my father— “If you cannot come on yourself, I wish Mrs Adams would, and bring with her, her Brother Johnson.—The air of Quincy Sea, and...
Another number of your journal came to hand this day—I mark your advice, to say nothing more upon the subject of the “diplomatic controversy,” and I am much inclined that way myself—I have no desire to put him down lower than he has put himself; but the opinions upon objects of great interest, avowed and urged in his Letters want putting down, much more than the man—And I have written what...
Your delightful journal of Friday and Saturday has just come to hand—What diverts me most in it, is the regular Saturday Night’s indisposition of the Horses— The heat here on Saturday was almost suffocating—Since then it has been more supportable, but is yet very oppressive—A furlough of six weeks would be delicious to me—but you know some of my reasons for not taking it this year—I am weary...
We continue to be delighted almost daily with your journalizing Letters—which together with our visits to the theatre, enliven the dulness of our half–solitude—Scarcely a day passes indeed but I have new visitors at my Office; but they all merely candidates for Office, and though of course all persons of extraordinary merit, their conversation has no tendency to make or keep one cool, in these...
On the back of my last Letter, I acknowledged the receipt of yours of the 14th. and yesterday came your delightful Journal of the next day—I am charmed to find that you meet with so many friends and acquaintance at Philadelphia; and much more so that Dr Physick, has satisfied himself that there is no dropsy in your case. Commodore Rodgers called on me this Morning to say he was going for...
I thank you for your affectionate remembrance of my birthday—We passed it as pleasantly as circumstances would admit at Mr Frye’s; but I was not very well that day and was more than usually overpowered by the heat—On returning home too we were caught in a thunder–shower and throughly drenched. The Metropolis is daily thinning off—The Secretary of the Navy and family are gone—The President goes...
Receiving on Sunday your rebuke for the blank covers I had forwarded to you, I should have felt it more severely had I not concluded that about the same hour you would be receiving from me the proof that I had not been altogether so remiss as you had supposed. We have had since the beginning of the month such a succession of roasters, day and night that I have felt myself almost reduced to the...