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    • Adams, Abigail Smith
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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Abigail Smith" AND Recipient="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I received Your Letter of July 18th on Saturday 25th. It was a great damper to me, who had been pleasing myself with the expectation of Soon Seeing you, and my Son—nor can I now relinquish the hope, that the impediments you mention, may be so accommodated as to give mr Adams a few weeks respite at least. From the account you give of your health, I Should think you would be benefited: by a...
I write a line to enclose a Letter from Harriet. George has been so steady at Cambridge that I have had but one visit from him since he went there. I expect Him and his Brothers to keep thanksgiving with us; there is then a vacation of nearly a week—.John will want an additional pr of pantaloons. he is such a wrestless active Being that he is always in motion and his blews which he has worn so...
The Children Say that they have your permission to come to Town to dine with Commodore Hull—and to Stay untill Saturday to visit the Carval I have accordingly let them take the Stage this morning—I think they had better accept mrs Fosters invitation & Lodge there, but that as you judge best; mrs Adams will be calld home, Elizabeth being again very sick—I hope to See you in Town tomorrow— yours...
I have not yet acknowledged your favour of June 27th I go so seldom into the buisy world, that I can get little to amuse or entertain you with. Harriet too is yet with her Sister. She always had something of foreign or domestic to amuse us with—I miss her much, and that upon the Childrens account, as well as my own—The fourth of July has past with much Eclat, and good humour in Boston, with an...
I heard of you at Providence from mr Fearno , and I was yesterday informd that the News paper reported your arrival at N york on Saturday. I hope tomorrows Mail will give me Some direct intelligence as the two or three first days of your journey the weather was very oppressive, I fear you must have endured great fatigue. By this time I hope you are compensated for it, by the happy meeting of...
Since the 18th July, I have not received a Line from you or my Son, altho I have been in daily expectation of hearing that you were sitting your faces this way. I have learnt from mr Cruft that mr Adams contemplated being here, as I understood him by the last of this Month, or sooner if he could. The intercourse between us, is not so frequent as I could wish. Even tho it consisted of “How do...
Your Journal No 7. to Janry 30th, Harriet brought me to day, just as we had sat down to dinner; It being thursday, John and Charles thought they would treat themselves, and miss Harriet with a Sleigh ride to Quincy—our Friends and acquaintance do not fail to improve the Season, and sometimes come upon us a little unwarily, for one day last week, I had nine at once to dine, when I knew only of...
Your Letter of May 2d was so long comeing, that I feared Sickness had arrested your pen—as Subjects for the use of it are always within your power, because subjects of a domestic Nature are every day occurences, and always interesting to Friends. and judging by myself, I communicate to you the pleasure I enjoy in finding that your admonitions to George have had a salutary effect, both as it...
The fine Sleighing has tempted So many visitors to make use of it, that we have had a Constant Succession of company, altho the weather has been Severely cold—This day thus far, I have not been interrupted, and I take my pen, to acknowledge your favour of Febry 4th received upon the 12th. on that day Mrs Quincy with miss Storer & miss Quincy, came to take Tea with us. John and Charles, having...
I received your journal No 4. containing the drawing Room History, which amused us much. What would have been Said in my day, if So much Style, pomp and Etiquette had been assumed? the Cry of Monarchy, Monarchy, would have resounded from Georgia to Maine.—but according to the old proverb—some persons may Rob; better than others look over the hedge.—I am not condemning this new order of...
A long period has elapsed since I addrest a line to you—I have not taken my pen for three weeks—I have been so constantly occupied with my visitors, and a sick domestic, who has been near dieing with a Billious fever the whole time my Friends were with me, that I could not find a leisure moment. mr & mrs DeWint his Mother their children and servants left us last week, about the time when...
My correspondence has been much interrupted the last fortnight Susan has been So feeble and weak, that She has required much care and attention She is now but just able to leave her Chamber, and that only for a short time, and we have had ten days of dismal wet weather, in which the Sun has not once Shone,—it has produced much Sickness, of the Quincy and Croup kind, with Children—My Son T B As...
I received yesterday your journal to the 21st of Jan’ry. Washington Seems to be in a whirpool of dissipation—well described by Scott in his tales of my Landlord—“a chase through Life, after follies not worth catching; and when caught successively thrown away; a chase pursued from days of tottering infancy to old Age—Toys and merry makings in Childhood, Love and its absurdities in youth....
I this morning received Your Second Letter, by way of journal. we have all been highly entertaind. it makes me a Sharer with you, in your various occupations—brings me acquainted with Characters, and places me at your fire Side. one Single Letter conveys more information in this way, than I could obtain in a whole Session of Congress.—I hope you will continue this method altho you will receive...
you will I know excuse my not haveing written to you more than once; when you learn the additional care and anxiety I have had in my Family by the Sickness of Louisa, who has had two other allarming attacks of pukeing blood, more than half a pint each time, and a much larger quantity passing down. She is much reduced, and for several days unable to leave her Bed—She is now able to sit up...
I have been haunted with the Deamon of omission, and a hundred Sprights in the garb of excuses, Such as Company, family avocations Noisy Boys &c &c This morning, being very Stormy, I determined to expel them all, and commence writing a Letter to you. I beleive I had promised to write to my Son. I know that he must be so enveloped in publick Buisness, that he can ill afford time to attend to...
I received your Letter of March 2d which has increased my anxiety to hear again from you, for a series of misfortunes Seem to have clustered around you. pray inform me how mrs Frye her Husband and Children are? I scarcly expect to hear the last are living. what a Scene you had to pass through? I do not wonder you were Sick—That Erysipelas which has Several times troubled you, is a very...
I received your very kind Letter, in which you take so great interest in my health, that I am bound to say much of myself in return; for I have profited by your admonitions and those of my other Friends.In the first place, I indulge myself in the morning, and seldom rise before the sun I use no more exercise than I think my health requires—altho I frequently hear, o do not go there, do not do...