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If you can obtain leave of absence I wish for the pleasure of your Company here on the twelfth of the month—and I wish you to present my Compliments to the President, and Tutors whose consent is requisite, and ask the favour of them There is not any topick of Conversation here, but the horrours of duelling—and Mail Robbers, we do not meddle with politicks— love to John—and am affectionately /...
Harriet Welsh writes me that George and you intend to visit Mrs. de Wint during the vacation and that if your father grants you permission you intend to go on to Niagara—I had made a partial engagement to accompany Mr. & Mrs. de Wint to Niagara this fall but I do not feel quite sure that I shall be able to accomplish this purpose as your father tho’ he says I may go always appears to have...
Will you allow me Sir, the honor of presenting, and afford me the gratification of perusing the pamphlet herewith forwarded? containing an account of the Battle of Bunker Hill by Major Genl. Dearborn, and a feeble endeavour on my part, to repel the charges therein made, against the character and conduct of the late Major Genl. Israel Putnam. In ordinary cases, I have deemed the pamphlet in its...
I cannot imagine my Dear John what can be the reason of your not writing to me. You used to be a very regular correspondent, but I suppose the Ladies have such demands on your time you have none to bestow on your poor Mother. We are very happy to learn from Mr Pomeroy, that your Grandfather is so entirely recovered he tells us the old Gentleman has not looked so well this two years as he does...
Captain Ryk takes his leave and presents the Expression of his Veneration to His Excellency President Adams. Among all the pleasant recollections his stay in Boston never will fail to give him. certainly he allways will remember with the greatest interest that he had the honour to be introduced to the Veteran of the American liberty, ones the first Magistrate now the father of the first...
Although I did not hear from Montezillo—Since your very affectionate Letter of 30 May—except by our friend Tyng, on 27 July—I am confident, that I can not be forgotten—and Supposed, that health and contentment must have remained your familys Share, increased yet by the presence of the Secretary of State, and the distinguished progress of your grandson—yet these pleasing contemplations were...
I received your letter with pleasure, and read it with high satisfaction. You have paid the highest compliment on the President’s Message or rather, Elogium, that I have yet seen, or have ever heard of—Our proud federalists however are displeased & mortified that he did not tell the whole world, how grand, how rich, how powerful, how gifted & how virtuous they in Boston are above all other...
Confident, that, after Such a long Silence, a few Letters of an old friend, who allways revered you, and will continue to do So till his last breath, Shall not be unacceptable, I once more take up my pen I can not—after approaching my 73th foster the hope, that I Shall be permitted to do it often—But I will not delay it longer—as I hear neither from you or my N. England frends a word—except...
Several times since my return home, I have thought it wd be proper to write you on the subject of the Conversation that took place at your table as both business, & a certain reluctance to resume the subject, have prevented me from enacting this purpose.—Further reflexion has convinced me that justice to myself and to the cause of truth, imposes a duty on me, to vindicate the Olive Branch &...
You are respectfully informed, that at a meeting of the NEW-YORK HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY, held on the 31st day of August 1824, you were elected an HONORARY MEMBER. By order of the Society, MHi : Adams Papers.
Although my health is very indifferent, and my eyes soo weak and dim, that within a fortnight, I could Scarce affect any thing, either by labour or in writing—yet I must indulge the gratification of thanking you, for the few affectionate lines with which your kindness favoured me with. My Physician Says—all will be Soon well—the chief remedies are—abstinentia et quiete.Was your life less...
I was so much occupied during my stop at Borden Town I could not answer your Letter therefore busy myself here having nothing to do with all the nonsense I can think of for pastime. You can easily conceive, the dreariness of my situation travelling alone with your father who though more of a than I can recollect since the earliest period of our marriage is still too much of a Statesman to be...
My Dear and ever Honor’d And beloved Father and And Friend—For such I shall ever consider you.—it greives & mortifies me to think I am obliged to leave this place tomorrow Morning without the Happiness of seeing you—my Health for sometime back has been miserable indeed— I have rode out but twice, & that but a short distance, since last Thursday week; and since that , I found as much as I could...
I write you a few lines my dear John in answer to yours which I received last night merely to say we are all well and your Grandfather better but we are so immerced in dinners and partys that my head is perfectly turned— Give my love to Johnson (Hellen), and tell him not to grieve—for I am glad the connection has failed as there is something in the conduct of all parties not altogether...
Being very well I hasten to write you and although you disclaim all merit in a certain transaction still to repeat my approbation of a conduct which does you so much honour and which I hope (although you must not expect) will be rewarded by the improvement and merit of its object—Should this not happen do not suffer the disappointment to mortify or wound your feelings or to damp any future...
Will you Oblidge me, so far as to inform me, the Names of the Seventeen Members of the House of representatives of Massachusets, who rescinded their Notes By direction or rather a ‘Mandate, (if I am correct,) of Governer Hutcheson’—and what year that was in, and on what Occasion those resolutions had been Passed, that he the Sd Govener was so anxious Should be rescinded—was it not on account...
I take pleasure in introducing to your acquaintance the Revd. Mr Barber, who has been some years attached to the Catholic Seminary at this place and to the College at Georgetown, and is now going to reside at Claremont in New Hampshire. In passing through Boston he proposes to pay you a visit, from which I am persuaded you will derive equal satisfaction with him. I am, Dear Sir, your faithful...
I took up in a bookstore this morning a work that has just appeared in two volumes entitled “ The History of the American Revolution by Paul Allen .” Mr Allen is a man of talents and I presume has written a valuable history—but I looked over only one or two pages in his first volume where he is speaking of the Congress at New York in 1765—and which he concludes in the following manner:—“The...
As you take a deep interest in our College and the conduct of its affairs, I enclose you Mr Websters report made on that subject to the convention. Its object is to confirm by constitutional provision the law of Judge Parsons’ contrivance in 1810, re-enacted by an additional act in 1814.—laws admitted by the amendment itself to be invalid without this confirmation! This devise, to say the...
I am, indeed, gratified by the receipt of your letter of the 27th ulto. The approbation of those we ourselves reverence for their virtues, is, perhaps, the sweetest reward for our efforts to be useful. Only eleven volumes of the Weekly Register are yet finished. These may be forwarded, if you please, immediately to Boston, & can be easily sent to you, through Mr. Dawes; or by my agent there,...
I have taken the liberty to forward you by mail a volume of Letters on the past & present State of France, which I beg you to accept as a testimonial of my high sense of the services you have rendered to the cause of real freedom—I cannot flatter myself with the belief that their perusal will afford you any information since they relate to a period of history with which you are perfectly...
Decbr. 3d Did not attend at Church Mr Ryland was to preach and his last sermon was such a strange medley of scraps and ends miserably put together I did not feel tempted to go again—remained at home all day. 4th The day was stormy and disagreeable—In the Eveng went into George Town to fetch Fanny Johnson. The Stage had not arrived and we drove to Mrs. Frye’s where we took Tea—She mentioned...
I Som three weeks ago took the liberty of writing to you in Concequen ce of the Advice of Mr Jefferson’s but he I fear will no longer have Permission to give Advice he being given Over by his Physicians, but that Sad news you no doubt—Sir are too well aquainted with now Sir as I must Shortly go to Washington and the Cold wether would hinder my proceeding in The Modeling Sir will your goodness...
I have the honor, in fulfilment of my official duty, to transmit to you a copy of the Constitution of a Society, just established, which recognizes the general policy in regard to the Indian tribes in our country, pursued during your administration. From this consideration, I am permitted, sir, to indulge a confident hope, that this Constitution, & the Office under it to which you are...
I had this day an opportunity to examine our Town Records. In May 1765 the representatives chosen were James Otis, Thomas Cushing, Oxenbridge Thacher and Thomas Gray. In May 1766 were chosen James Otis, Thomas Cushing, Samuel Adams and John Hancock. I am very respectfully PS. I have read Mr. Wirt’s sketches of Mr. Henry and also a review of them in the North American Review for this month....
I recieved in due time your two favors of Dec. 2. & Feb. 10. and have to acknolege for the ladies of my native state their obligations to you for the encomiums which you are so kind as to bestow on them. they certainly claim no advantages over those of their sister states, and are sensible of more favorable circumstances existing with many of them, & happily availed of, which our situation...
I was duly favored, sometime since, with thy kind notice of my late publications, for which I thank thee, and was also much gratified with thy remarks on recent political counts in this State. Fortunately I have delayed this reply until now, when I pray thee to accept my very hearty congratulations on the Election of thy Son to the Presidency of the United States. This must be highly...
I feel exceedingly honored as well as gratified by your kind notice of my humble labours. Your Letter, which I shall preserve with Care, will be a proud Testimony to my descendents, that their Ancestor enjoyed the esteem of one of the most illustrious among the illustrious founders of this great Empire. I have not read either Bryant’s Analysis nor Dupuis’ Culte Universal, but Shall read them...
It is very long, my dear friend, since I have written to you. the fact is that I have was scarcely at home at all from May to September, and from that time I have been severely indisposed and not yet recovered so far as to sit up to write, but in pain. having been subject to troublesome attacks of rheumatism for some winters past, and being called by other business into the neighborhood of our...
I have seen Mr. Stuart, and he requests me to say he is ready at any moment to give you a sitting that is convenient to yourself, and it is unnecessary for me to add that we shall esteem it a great pleasure to have our house made acceptable to you— If agreable I would inform Mr Stuart the time you shall appoint to see him.—which I presume will be in the early part of the day. I am with great...
I dare not, no, I will not delay longer my answer to your affectionate Letter, with which I was honoured again—neither my Severe headache, nor bad eyes would not have occasioned it, but, I flattered myself from day to day, to receive tidings from your Dear and estimable Caroline—or her Pastor—but I do not feel any anxiety about that family—as I am persuaded that the Rev. Westbrook would have...
Had I strength enough remaining to have left my Room, to which I have been confind by severe & threatening indisposition for more than Three weeks past, I should not have made my congratulations, and participations of Joy on the event wch has this morning been announced by the Election of your beloved Son to the Presidency— An event which I have been earnestly looking forward to for the last...
Various causes, connected with the absence & illness of Revd Mr Fay of the old church, have delayed my going into the investigations which you requested me to make respecting the elder Mr. Shepperd & the Messrs Quincys. I am sorry, now that I have made them, that it has been to so little purpose, or rather to no purpose at all. You ask whether the Records of the Town or Church were destroyed...
you did me the honour some time since after reading my memoir of Dr Hugh Williamson to write me a letter stating some particulars relative to the Hutchinson letters’ which were new to me and which are calculated to unfold some secrets of that affair that before were inexplicable, I mean relating to the agency of Mr Temple and Mr Hartley— I read that part of your letter to the new york...
As no act of the Congress of the Thirteen United American Colonies was so distinguished as that by which their Independence of Great Britain was declared, the most particular history of that transaction will probably be sought for; not merely as an interesting curiosity, but to do substantial justice to the abilities and energy of the leaders in that great measure. By the public journals it...
I take the liberty to transmit to you a discourse delivered at the consecration of the Synagogue in this City an event which from its novelty may be somewhat interesting It cannot but be gratifying to you to observe that perfect harmony existing in our Country between men of different faiths & the mildness & tolerance growing out of our national Institutions—and this gratification must be...
Once more I must give you my cordial thanks for this proof of your remembrance—not, that I suspected it—but I did not expect so soon an answer. Every one, which I receive every letter of myself—I consider—nearly unwillingly—that it may be the last of our correspondence—continued now since more than forty years—during which—whatever Station you fulfilled—I was allways honoured with your kind...
Yesterday I was highly gratified with your affectionate Letter, and answer it directly, not to renew my thanks, as I can no more express these as lively, as I See it impossible to reciprocate these—and then you dare to ask me, if my residence at Montezillo had been tolerable—did not then my friend read my contentment—in every gesture, in every feature of my visage—then certainly my countenance...
I have taken the liberty to forward to you a pamphlet containing a few papers prepared for the 4th vol. of the Academy’s Trans with a request that you would do me the honor to accept it— It gives me great pleasure to find that the situation of your health permits you to accept a seat in the convention, where your advice & influence will be extremely important in preserving a constitution,...
Yesterday brought me your Letter of the 7th which I was sorry announced a mishap which gave me some concern—I recommend you for the future on a rainy day to put your Seals in your pocket before you set out to school as a sure guard against such accidents— If your father will permit me I will lend you the American Revolution with pleasure as I am sure you will read it carefully and not injure...
The past week has scarcely been marked by any occurrence worth relating in a letter, the weather after having been intensely warm on Sunday and Monday cooled off and we have had an Easterly storm ever since. This makes me quite dull as I prefer the Sun with all his fires. General La Fayette after having thrust his benign countenance among us; has gone to other places to make them happy for a...
There is in Boston, a Lemmon-tree of a peculiar kind, called the Sweet Lemmon, Sent to your Grandfather, by a gentleman from Malaga—and I expect it will be in the custody of our friend Mr J H Foster, by Tomorrow. Your Grandfather is desirous of presenting this plant to the Botanical garden, in Cambridge, and wishes you to call on Mr: Peck the Professor, with his compliments, tendering the Tree...
Your Letter my dear John gave us great uneasiness on your Grandfathers account and we feel very anxious lest the violence of the shock should have injured his health. We hope to hear from you frequently and that your Letters may be welcomed as harbingers of good instead of ill news for the future— I propose to leave this City on the 14 as your father wishes me to travel in the Carriage I shall...
Mrs. Quincy was this day in my office looking at the Colony records, and mentioned to Mr. Davis that you would be gratified to see the Will of Capt: Myles Standish, I have copied it, and send it to you by Mrs. Quincy, if it gives you as much pleasure in reading it as it does me in sending it to you I shall be well paid for the little trouble I have had in copying it.— I am with the highest /...
As you will not wait in bestowing your kindnesses, till I arrive at Montezillo, you must permit me to give you my cordial thanks for this renewed proof of frendship—If well, then I leave my family—half of August—and hope to See you befor, the end of that month. I Shall be at mrs Eliot’s about the 21—if I come Safe as far at Cambridge.— Saturday we were unexpectedly visited by mr Dwight Miss C....
We are about commencing the 87th. year of our pilgrimage. And by the last Catalogue of H.C. among the front Ranks of our Cotemporary of that—and indeed of any other of our Early Society,—May Health of Body & mind accompany you, the ensuing, equal and surpass what you have enjoyed the year past.—Our political matters in Maine appear somewhat changeable especially in the Official duties of the...
Habituated as I have long been to consider your judgement as infallible, I have not found it exactly so on the subject of our two last letters. When I wrote to you on that subject of the heart, I had come to a fixed resolution of following the advice of my family & friends. I have penetrated their thoughts, & have discovered their opinion which taken collectively amounts to this— we censure...
This ‘ Baby ’ of mine, the little Book sent herewith, is truly a very small Book; but thou wilt consider it a portal to a vast edifice, & as I ask thy acceptance of it, made small as it is, as a mark of my most sincere regard. Thou wilt see, by this, what a new & vast field the enterprize of New York is opening to public view: these Canals, minutely traced, 420 odd miles in length, are new...
Tho’ you have not indulged me with the pleasure of hearing from you, since your return to Quincy, I have been comforted with the assurances of others, who have seen you, that you thought you were benefited by your excursion and sustaind the fatigues of your journey much better than you expected—every thing that contributes to exhilarate your comforts, or pleasures, adds to mine in a decuple...
Your kind concern for me, fills me with deep feelings of gratitude—I am as yet confined to my Room, where I been suffering varieties of pain & debility in so much that in various stages, I began to consider I shd never have the happiness of seeing you again—but after a hard conflict the violent inflamation in my lungs, yielded to a constant blistering of more than five weeks—& would have been...