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    • Boylston, Ward Nicholas
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    • Adams, John
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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I am deeply sensible of all your kind feelings towards me, as express’d in your affectionate Letter of the 24th Ultimo. my wishes are in union with yours, that we were nearer each other, than we are, the sigh, is at present vain—I often contemplate a possiblity that if I sent my carriage & Thos. Alker a faithfull & well experienced driver, & you could feel strong enough to bear a ride of 10...
I wrote before I left Roxbury expressing as I really felt my deep regret that I could not see you before I set out for this place—for the first since the 28’ of Jany I tried my strengh on Sunday last, but a ride of a mile wch I endured with wch the hope I should be able in the course of the week to have reachd Quincy, but the next day Tho’ Alken injured his hand so much as to render him...
I have from day, to day, for the last fortnight flatter’d myself with an improvement, so far as to enable me to take the air, but in this I have been sadly disappointed. The utmost I have been able to do has been to walk from one Room to another, & even that with pain—my feet and ancles, being so much enlarged, tho’ I conclude in some measure from long confinement, & in some degree from the...
I was made very happy in hearing by Mr G W. Adams (who was so kind as to Take his birth day dinner with us,) that you continued as well as you had been for sometime past—also that all our Friends at Washington were as we wish them in, perfect health— I have my Dear Cousin, sent another Barrell of the same Cask, from wch. the last I sent you was drawn,—if you find it as good I shall be...
Your kind concern for me, fills me with deep feelings of gratitude—I am as yet confined to my Room, where I been suffering varieties of pain & debility in so much that in various stages, I began to consider I shd never have the happiness of seeing you again—but after a hard conflict the violent inflamation in my lungs, yielded to a constant blistering of more than five weeks—& would have been...
It has been a great mortification to me, that in every attempt in every direction I have sought, I did not untill yesterday, succeed, in procureing the two Barrels of Cyder now sent—its declared to me, to be three years old, its perfectly clear & fit for immediate use. I wish you to taste it, & let me know if the quality that suits your palate—I have also sent half a Dozen pints of the same...
You cannot Immagine the comfort your Letter of 22d Ultimo gave me I fear’d Indisposition had so far disabled you to dictate a Letter, as to leave me expossed to the contradictory accounts I now, & then had by transient visitors, who had heard from others something concerning your health; young Mr Quincy exceptd who gave me a more direct account of you, and since then thro’ Mr T P Davis who...
It seems an age to me , since we parted, and have not since had any accounts from those who have visited me here what has been the state of your health since that period, the best evidence I have rec’d has been thro the medium of the public News papers, in one of wch. is given the toast you sent the charitable masonic association Dinner given to Gen. LaFayette. If I can draw an Inference from...
Your kind letter just rec’d is a Cordial to my spirits, in the lengthend days of my confinement to a sick room since the 22d of last January, without any exercise but that of patience, under pain and debility, or even a Rocking Chair to give releif— I am now convalesing, tho’ at one time I apprehended from the attack being similar, I was soon to follow Govr Eustis & Gen Brooks—& a multitude of...
I rejoice to hear you are in better health than when I left you on Sunday Evg and earnestly hope that your approaching birth day will give a promise of greater improvement—I count with impatience the pleasure we have promised ourselves of finding our hopes confirmd— Yesterday my Nephew my Sisters only Son arrived from England by the way of Canada—with your leave, we shall bring him to pay his...
Had I strength enough remaining to have left my Room, to which I have been confind by severe & threatening indisposition for more than Three weeks past, I should not have made my congratulations, and participations of Joy on the event wch has this morning been announced by the Election of your beloved Son to the Presidency— An event which I have been earnestly looking forward to for the last...
With deep concern I heard late last Eveng. that you had recently recieved a severe injury by a Fall as had at first appear’d to threaten your existance—I feel so much paind and anxious to know the cause as well as to hope that the effects of the injury has subsided, that I lose no time in making the enquiries, that I have sent my young man with this in the hope that I shall receive such...
Your affectionate Letter of 24th Ultimo, I had the pleasure to receve and would have acknowledged before this, had not the daily interruption of accidental visitants—and likewise an injury I rec’d from a restive Horse; an injury, (which at first I tho’t trivial) has been followed by effects which threatend a speedy abruption of all my worldly schemes & desires. I am still confin’d to the House...
With great pleasure I saw it announced in the public news papers that you was able to attend the celebration of the 4th Instant—it was at least an evidence that your Health & Strength had improved since the date of the last letter you favor’d me with—I have since been solicitous to gather from every wayfareing passenger thro’ this place who have called on me, what they knew or could learn of...
I lament to say, that I have been at this place two months, without a Line from you—or seeing any person, who had within that period seen you—I have some degree of pleasure in flattering myself, that you will releive my anxieties by a Letter in reply to one I wrote you a fortnight since.— The Inclosed Letter was closed to go by the Stage tomorrow morning, but Dr Thayer who preached here today...
I wrote you, for it was out of my power to see you before I left Roxbury for this place, and afterwards found my intentions of sending you some of that species of Fish you say, you are most fond of—and are only caught at one particular season—had been so far fullfilld as to be put into the Hands of a person who faithfully promised you should have them the day they were caught—I hope he...
My Dear and ever Honor’d And beloved Father and And Friend—For such I shall ever consider you.—it greives & mortifies me to think I am obliged to leave this place tomorrow Morning without the Happiness of seeing you—my Health for sometime back has been miserable indeed— I have rode out but twice, & that but a short distance, since last Thursday week; and since that , I found as much as I could...
Nothing but the want of Sight has delay’d the acknowledgement of your most kind Letter of the 24th Ultimo—it reminded me of an Inscription Cut out of the frontace piece of a Church, I went to see at Millnor viz Full, & Intire Indulgences, Granted for all Sins, Past, Present, & to come—what can I say in return—only that it is impossible I thus can say or willingly do any thing Not for a moment,...
When I rec’d your Letter dated from Badimage Hall, I then read it, according to the meaning of the French term—but I since find by the News paper of Saturday last, that it was in plain English—no joke—but that you have carried your truely magnificent Intention into immediate effect—the object as announced in the papers do not exactly define the purport of it as your Letter Mentions—no doubt...
How unfortunate I am, that I was not ealier informed of your magnificent intentions with respect to your establishment at Quincy—my Hundred Thousands would be some help to be sure, but a small one in comparison with the extended of the many that are to be blessed with it— But what will you say to me, when you hear of my building a large stone edifice on the summit of Wachusetts—for the...
The promised extract of my old Friend Dr: Nicholls Letter, as given you in my Last Letter which went by Mail—is now Inclosed; it may serve to give you some information respecting the state of things in England, wch are not, likely to come in view thro’ the medim of the public papers—and some points wch. could be known among the parties Interested at those periods in events that were passing—I...
Nothing but an absolute impossibility prevented my seeing you at Quincy before I we came to this place—I was obliged to Employ every moment for a fortnight before I set out in settleing some very important pecuniary demands, wch. the death of any one of the parties (of which there were 6 in number), would have defer’d a close untill after my Death—I had agencys & attornies to attend to, in...
When I had the pleasure of meeting Judge Adams in Boston on Saturday last, & to whom I gave a Note wch I took out of the Post—he intimated that it was probable you would not want for a Snow Storm, but would indulge us with Happiness of seeing you & the family some day this week, wch I was rejoiced to hear, as every appearance of Snow has passed off without leaving enough to make it possible to...
Tho’ you have not indulged me with the pleasure of hearing from you, since your return to Quincy, I have been comforted with the assurances of others, who have seen you, that you thought you were benefited by your excursion and sustaind the fatigues of your journey much better than you expected—every thing that contributes to exhilarate your comforts, or pleasures, adds to mine in a decuple...
Your kind & welcome Letter by mail of last Eveng relieved my increasing anxieties respecting the cause of your long silence, I placed it to various events, or employments but my fears suggested that you were unwell and too much indisposed even to dictate a Letter, as I knew Mr G W Adams was most probably with you—a Glimpse of relief however appear’d from what was announced in the Boston News...
I have been precluded an opportunity of writing, by two circumstances; one the want of eyesight, the other by a Succession of Company from various places and from various objects—we are now alone, and I devote the first interval to enquiries after your health—I have some ground to hope it has not been long interrupted, if I may judge from the very polite Letter written to a widow Lady, in the...
It is a source of Deep regret and vexation to me, that I was obliged to leave Roxbury without seeing you again—Bad weather, Bad, & sometimes impassable Roads by repeated unusual Snow Storms, together with a Bad cold, & Rhuematic lameness, kept me a prisioner to my House untill a few days before I came to this place—and being under a previous obligation to be here from the 7th. to 12th of last...
For such you have allowed me to call you, (the evidence of wch. I shall retain as long as I retain any thing in my possession, and, shall cherish with delight—tho’ rank’d in age with the Patriarchs of the old Testament times—Indeed I think I begin to feel the infirmities of that age by a Rheumatic afliction in both arms, both legs, & indeed universial—or you wou’d have seen me at Quincy before...
I have sent my Sleigh with Bear skins, & Furs, and as the day is fine and the sleighing never better I hope you will find yourself better for a change of air, and as our Rooms are well air’d, you will find yourself as comfortably warm as you will be, in your own Room—we shall be at home to you & your own Family alone—and every thing done to make you comfortable & at your ease I have procured a...
I call’d this morning upon The Treasurer of the Commonwealth—and rec’d of him Eight Dollars— to your pay as Elector—your pay as delegate he said required your order—Which I enclose for your signature & to be returnd to me, wch. I will immediately apply for payment, wch. is 70 Dollars—added to the Eight Dollars already rec’d I will pay to Mr Foster or send to you by post if he is not able to...
Your kind Letters are more likely to renew a worn down constitution than the recipe you give, for making my way to it by wrangling & Disputation in a Convential diet (if I should ever get there) tho I shall expect to see a good many coxcombs in politicks & constitution makers as will produce to my feelings what you describe When the yeas, & nays wch. were tried in this Town, several of the...
Your affectionate Letter of the 10th. Instant, was rec’d while under a second, but more painfull relapse than the first; which reduced my Strength, flesh, & spirits so low as left me but faint hopes of recovery—I am however so far convalescent again as to walk from one Room to another & if no interveneing relapse takes place hope to be able to take the air in a few days. after a confinement to...
My boasted convales’cense, did not continue but a few hours after Dr. Warren & Dr Gorham left me. To the care of the former I committed the last letter I have been able to pen, from the severity of my relapse wch. has reduced me to an extreme degree of Weakness, & for 11 Nights out of 13 I was unable to lie down & caught what repose the Intervals wou’d allow me to take, bolster’d up in a...
I have not been so much puzzled to find the Text, I quoted in my last letter, as I have been, to get relief from a constant stricture in my breast with a severe Cough & incipient hemorhage of the lungs, which has forbidden the use of my pen; and thus my first hour of convalescence I dedicate to the gratefull acknowledgemt of your kind letter of the 16th. ultimo.— Nothing my Dear Cousin gives...
Your ever welcome & kind Letter of the 6th. Ultimo, did not reach me untill the 20th. since then my eyes has denied me the pleasure of acknowledeing it. What you quote as the precept of Confucius, does not apply in that Instance, to me, for I have always rec’d more gratification from you than I am able to return—and you are not able to estimate the value I put upon your kindness to judge how...
I have just returned from Cambridge, where I was told by by President Kirkland, that the priz is for in Elocution are to Commence at 1/2 past Nine oClock precisely instead of Eleven oClock as Mr G W Adams informed us yesterday.—I hope this alteration or any change in the Weather will not prevent your haviening the on this occasion with your company the pleasure which woud be ever gratefully...
We return’d to this place the Day after we had the pleasure of seeing you at Quincey—I have seized upon every moment of leisure since to reperuse your discourses on Davila, and Letters written at Amsterdam—from both I daily derive more information and pleasure than from any thing on those subjects publish’d before, or since the Revolution,—in so much that I am astonish’d at my own stupidity in...
your truely affectionate Letter of the 27th ultimo met me at this place by last mail, and I use the return of the same, to make my acknowledgemts of gratitude, with reciprocations of Sentim e nt for the tender and flattering Interest you express for the recovery of my health, which has been very seriously deteriorated by the last inroad made upon it— I do assure you my Dear Friend, I feel most...
That I may prove to you and my Dear Mrs Adams, the high estimation of the value I attach to the picture you have confided to my care—I sent immediately for a blacksmith, and had an Iron fender made to go round the lower part, as a protection from the careless brush, of the House maid, or the incautious foot of those who might otherwise wish to come too near it—The room is every day aird, and...
I rejoice in the expectation of seeing you & Mrs Adams; and Miss S A—and as the Day that is most convenient to you wou’d be most agreeble to Mrs B & myself we have settled it with Mr. Vaughan & his family for Friday the 4th. April at 1/2 past two o clock but pray you will come to us an hour or two earlier, and be so kind as to let Judge and Mrs Adams know the day fixd. My Lord tells me you...