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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, George Washington" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I am at length about to attempt to answer your Letter but am not quite sure whether I shall be successfull as it is late and impossible to guard against interruptions— In the first place the Missouri question is decided—How I leave you to judge as you will read the account in the publick papers—The juggling between the Clerks of the House and the Speaker places our National Councils in so...
It is long since I wrote you, because I thought you so busily engaged that you would have no time to answer me, and because I believe my letters are rather an incumbrance than a pleasure— I thank you very much for the Poem which you sent me; it is like all the Poetry of Rogers very beautiful, but almost too highly polished, and if I may use the expression “smells too much of the lamp ” . You...
Your Letters were both delivered to me yesterday the one by Dr Waterhouse and one by the Mail. I am very happy to observe that you have at last considered the object of a correspondence with your parents in its proper point of view and from henceforth I have no doubt you will be as attentive as we could possibly wish— You must naturally feel a little anxious concerning your Socrates and I hope...
As I am much afraid that I shall not accomplish the plan proposed in my last Letter to John you will have an opportunity to take a part at the last exhibition in preference to the one you mention in October as should your father be able to go on he will probably not stay more than a fort night and that might not suit the time fixed— Your Letters to me leave me so little to answer that I can...
Your Letter has remained unanswered some time in consequence of the illness of Mary which has been pretty severe tho’ short she is now convalscent and I hope will soon be well— I propose to leave Town for Frederick on Thursday next where I shall probably remain ten days after which I shall go to Baltimore to the Wedding of Susan Buchanan who is to be married on the 21st. we shall only stay one...
My absence from the City must plead My excuse for not sooner congratulating you on your success in obtaining the prize and still more on the probability of your obtaining a reputation as an Orator one of the most essential requisites for a Publick man in our Country—It is a talent which may be considered as leading most directly and immediately to promotion and frequently to the highest...
I yesterday received your Letter dated Quincy and was delighted to find your very formidable journey without accident. I admire very much your kindness in having lengthened your ride, and separated from your Brothers for the purpose of delivering the Letter of your new acquaintance who I think must be exquisitely delighted by this exalted mark of friendship and devotion— I am sorry you could...
Your Letter which I received yesterday gave mutual delight to all of us—It was exactly the style I have so often wished you to acquire easy playful and affectionate. This is the peculiar charm of familiar correspondence and worth all the studied phrases and elegant quotations that you could select from the first rate and best authors I suppose your appointment to be one of the standing...
Your ridiculous Letter as you call it was received yesterday and gave me great pleasure as at least it evinced all the discernment which I have ever given you credit for and proved your own worth by the discarding all those little petty jealousies and narrow feelings which are too apt to colour our opinions and to jaundice our opinions judgment—I have no particular partiality for either of my...
Mary is amusing me as usual in crying and whining because I suggest to her the necessity of some occupation She has written one page of your fathers Bible Letters and imagines that after such an immense exertion she must rest from her labours altogether. I will leave it to you to decide whether the Sabbath is to be literally understood as a day of total inactivity both of mind and body or...