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    • Adams, Louisa Catherine …
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    • Adams, George Washington
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, Louisa Catherine Johnson" AND Recipient="Adams, George Washington" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I am very glad to learn from your last that Mrs. Thornton gave Mrs. Hamilton a party as I was really grieved to be obliged to leave her in such a dull place without having introduced her to some of the inhabitants She is a very fine Woman— The Letter you sent me from John was a merry one in his usual style but I cannot help feeling uneasy about Charles although happy to know he is at Quincy—...
When I left you my Dear George I was far from believing that an act of so little importance as the to the publick as the Endorsement of the Note for Mrs Moulton, should have been made a charge of so painful a nature against you Father; and brought so much shame upon the poor woman, who has been so cruelly and wantonly attacked in consequence of it—You have heard my statement concerning the...
Your Letter caused me some uneasiness perhaps more than was necessary in consequence of your first concealment which though done with the very best motive renders me fearful and suspicious that you still make less of your complaint than is necessary and by this means decieve yourself as well as me as to the care and attention which may be due to remove it—You are at a critical age and caution...
It is long since I wrote you, because I thought you so busily engaged that you would have no time to answer me, and because I believe my letters are rather an incumbrance than a pleasure— I thank you very much for the Poem which you sent me; it is like all the Poetry of Rogers very beautiful, but almost too highly polished, and if I may use the expression “smells too much of the lamp ” . You...
Your Grandfather has expressed so much satisfaction at your conduct during your visit to him this vacation, that I have great pleasure in giving you this information; as it must be a great relief to your mind to know , that he has forgiven your late conduct, which I am sorry to say Dr. Kirkland informed me, had been deficient both of affection and respect—I will not say any more on this...
It is so long since I heard from you I begin to find it difficult to account for your Silence—Have the Muses siezed upon your imagination? Or is it a touch of the belle passion which occupies your contemplation and makes you forget your Mother? either of these things might perhaps plead in excuse though I can only allow these to be momentary.— Your occupations are I know numerous but one...
Your Letter which I received yesterday gave mutual delight to all of us—It was exactly the style I have so often wished you to acquire easy playful and affectionate. This is the peculiar charm of familiar correspondence and worth all the studied phrases and elegant quotations that you could select from the first rate and best authors I suppose your appointment to be one of the standing...
We have arrived safe after a very tedious and on the whole disagreeable journey as the state of my health tho’ much improved still makes me a burthen to all I most love in the world and I fear there is little prospect of a change for the better—There is something in this great unsocial house which depresses my spirits beyond expression and makes it impossible for me to feel at home or to fancy...
Your Letters were both delivered to me yesterday the one by Dr Waterhouse and one by the Mail. I am very happy to observe that you have at last considered the object of a correspondence with your parents in its proper point of view and from henceforth I have no doubt you will be as attentive as we could possibly wish— You must naturally feel a little anxious concerning your Socrates and I hope...
Your father my dear George is so much occupied at this moment by the duties of his Office he cannot find time to answer you immediately and has commission’d me to be his proxy; a poor one I confess but I know acceptable. Your remarks on Mr. Colemans preaching and manner were interesting and I have no doubt correct and there are few things that tend more to the improvement of young people than...