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I this moment only receive your letter of the 17th. Mine by this mail renders nothing more necessary in answer to it. I understand Mr. Crawford is so far recovered that he hopes to be on the road for Washington in a few days. His weakness I presume will make his journey very slow. Sending this with some other letters by an extra messenger who will hardly reach the P. Office in time I add only...
I have received Sir, your letter of the 13th. and regret that I cannot find among my papers the letter of Chief Justice Marshall to which you refer. Such a letter was certainly presented to me, and left an impression very favorable to your talent in taking likenesses. As your portrait of Mr. Marshall doubtless exists and his opinion of it can thro’ his family be obtained as well as their own...
This will be handed to you by Mr. Benjamin Randolph. He is charged with subscription papers for the Works of his Grandfather Mr. Jefferson, and expects much advantage from the friendly countenance of those most known to & respected by the people of the counties he is visiting. I need not, I am sure, make any apology for recommending him to yours; being persuaded that your personal dispositions...
¶ To James P. Morris. Letter not found. 1 August 1823. Listed in American Book Prices Current (1968), 1179, as a one-page, third-person letter, “thanking his correspondent for copies of the latter’s oration before the Agricultural Society of Bucks County.”
Col: McKenney supposing that the favorable opinion I formed of him during my long residence in Washington may corroborate the confidence & friendly dispositions he flatters himself you have derived from a more temporary acquaintance, I can not refuse him the justice of saying that I always regarded him as a very intelligent upright & patriotic Citizen: and that his official conduct was...
I have recd. your letter of Octr. 24. and enclose an Autograph of Mr. Monroe. Of Mr. Jay, none remain on my files. Mine is furnished by this answer to your letter. At my great age, & with my rheumatic fingers, it is very different from my ordinary writing at an earlier period, as you will perceive by the accompanying specimen I readily bestow commendation on your Antiquarian pursuit; but a...
I take advantage, my dear Sir of your permission to adopt the answers of others to your obliging letters, and the rather as my rheumatic fingers have a great aversion to the pen. I will not excuse them however from the service of thanking you for the account you give of our friends in Kentucky which is always interesting to me, and offering my regards & best wishes of every sort to Mrs. Taylor...
It has been much the wish of Mrs. Madison & myself to give a call at Barboursville whilst you remain there: but find it will not be in our power. We trust it will be in yours, if not before, to make a stage & pass a day at least with Mrs. Barbour and your family, at Montpellier, on the way to the port of your departures; to whom with yourself, we offer our joint and best salutations. RC ( ViHi...
Inferring from the silence of the Newspapers, since they announced your appointment as a visitor of the University, that your answer did not require a replacing one, I take for granted that you will be with your colleagues at the legal place & period. Allow me to count on your being thus far on your way in time for us to proceed hence together. I propose to set out on saturday after next, and...
This Indenture made this twelfth day of February A. D. 1830, between James Madison of the county of Orange and Dolley P. his wife of the one part, and James Newman of said county of the other part, Witnesseth, that the said James Madison and Dolley P. his wife, for and in consideration of the sum of twelve hundred and sixty six dollars to him the said James Madison by the said James Newman in...
Tho’ sorry to trouble you so often I must ask the further favor of you to let me have from the War Dept. a copy of Genl. Harrison’s letter of Resignation. It bears date the eleventh of May 1814. Also a copy of the letter of the Secy. of war acknowledging its receipt; date May 24. Also copy of the Secy’ letter to Harrison of May 28. accepting the Resignation of Harrison. Yrs. always RC ( DLC :...
I recd. by the last mail yours of the 9th. and comply with its request by a few lines to the President for the mail of today. I could not refuse this evidence of my esteem & regard, tho’ it is an interposition, of which obvious considerations make me as sparing as possible. Being entirely ignorant of the names with which yours will be in competition, I can form no estimate of the result. With...
I have received, young gentlemen, your letter of the 16th. inst: informing me that I have been elected an honorary member of the Franklin Literary Society of Randolph Macon College. My respect for the object of the Society, and the motives for associating my name with it, do not permit me to decline the distinction, however sensible I am of the little value that can be attached to its...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 18th. of March with the commission to which it refers; and shall duly attend to the trust which it assigns to me. Very respectfully RC ( Vi : Executive Papers). Undated. Addressed by JM to Preston at Richmond and franked. Conjectural date assigned on the basis of cover marked, “Orange C H Va. 19 May.” Cover docketed by Preston, “Expresident Madisons...
J. Madison offers his friendly respects to Mr. Strong with thanks for the copy of his Speech on the Tariff Bill. Less can not be said of it than that it presents with advantage, the particular views taken of the subject by the Author. Draft ( DLC ). James Strong (1783–1847), a Connecticut-born graduate of the University of Vermont, settled in Hudson, New York, and served in the U.S. House of...
The mail has just brought us information, in one instance under your own hand & name, that you have safely reached the land of your birth. I welcome you to it; and hope at an early day to welcome you at my own domicil, where I shall be able to express all the feelings awakened by your unexpected and gratifying visit. Meantime accept from Mrs. M. & myself all our best wishes. RC ( ViU ); draft...
I have recd. your letter of the 27th. Ult. accompanying the introductory one from my friend Mr. Joy. It is not probable, had you made your intended visit, that I could have given you as useful advice on the object of your pursuit as may be obtained from other sources, especially as Virginia may not be the State, in which you would prefer an establishment. I may say nevertheless, that the...
To my requests the day before yesterday I forgot to add that of a Copy of As letter to Harrison acknowledging the receipt of his Resignation; the date only being formerly asked for & sent in your last. Yours RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); draft ( DLC ). RC docketed by Monroe. Minor differences between the copies have not been noted.
I thank you for the copy of your Message. The moderation it breathes towards Spain will be approved generally at present, & universally hereafter. The time is passed when this policy could be ascribed to any other than its true motive. The present standing of the U.S. will secure to it a just interpretation every where. It is very satisfactory to learn that the greatest powers in Europe are...
Your favor of Jany. 26. came duly to hand. The information I wish to be obtained from Genl. Jackson is 1st. What was the form & dates of the appointments of Brigadier, and of Brevet Major General, accepted by him in his letter of June 8th. 1814. to the Secy. of war; and what the date of the Secretary’s letter inclosing the appointments. The term “form” refers to the distinction between...
Yours of the 1st. inst: came on slowly. I return the letter from Mr. Ingersoll whose continued drudgery in his profession, would be to be lamented, if his release from it would ensure such fruits of his literary pen, as one of his discourses to the Society, Philosophical (I think), which contained the ablest & most valuable Tableau of the Condition of the U. S. that has been published. I...
I have recd. a letter from H. Lee dated Nashville Aug. 24. stating that he had corresponded with Genl. Armstrong on the subject of the provisional order to Genl. Jackson of July 18. 1814, authorizing him on certain conditions to take possession of Pensacola; which order was not recd. by the General till on or about the 14th. of March 1815; and then open, and the envelope without postmark; and...
On the rect. of your letter inclosing a letter to Mr. Walker, I put the latter into the hands of one of my neighbors who married his daughter. It appears that the old Gentleman died a few days after your letter reached him; but that he recollected the debt, referred to, and expressed a confidence that he had never recd. a payment of it. His long inattention to the subject, is explained by a...
The inclosed is of little consequence, but you will see that it ought to have been addressed to you. Dr. Eustis & his lady having given us a call, it was agreed that he & myself shd. make a short visit to Mr. Jefferson of whose state of health, I had never been able to get any precise information. We found him substantially restored from his indisposition, with good appetite, and in the daily...
I have recd. yours of March 31st. and hasten to give the information you request. Mr. John Walker the lawyer to whom you allude, is still living in the adjoining County at a very advanced Age. He has long been well known to me as he was to my father, and has always been regarded as of the strictest probity, and in every respect a most worthy character. He is not affluent, but in very...
A most distressing picture has been presented to me of the condition of Mr. Cathcart and his numerous family, in the hope that as his official services which have had such a termination, were rendered whilst the Executive administration was in my hands, I might be induced to say something in his behalf. It is impossible to learn his actual distress and alarming prospects without sympathy; but...
Your letter informing the Visitors that you could not join them at their late meeting, was recd. by all of them with the particular feelings of regret excited by the cause of the disappointment. I hope the indisposition was transient, and that your health is now in a satisfactory State. You will have understood that Mr. Key persisted in his resignation, & that Mr. Bonnycastle has taken his...
I have just recd. a letter from Mr. Byrd Willis manifesting great anxiety to obtain a Cadet appt. for his son George, who he says has long been on the list of Candidates. The father derives encouragement from the descent of consanguinity of the son, connecting him with the Military merit of the revolution. Notwithstanding my general forbearance to intermeddle in such cases, I cannot well...
In the hurry of acknowledging yours of Ocr. 17. recd. at the last moment of the opportunity for the post office, I did not advert to the passage relating to enquiries to be made of Genl. Jackson. I hope you have not delayed your intended letter to him on that account. I should suppose it might be quite proper to ask from him copies of the documents appointing him Brigadier or Majr. General by...
I have recd. yours of the 7th. You will not doubt that our sympathies have been fully with you during the afflictions which have befallen you. I think you have done well in chusing your present situation, & for the reasons you express. I hope you will experience from it all the improvement which your health needs, and every advantage promised by it. My fear is that the Winter may be too rude...
I have rcd. your favor of the 3d. I am much obliged by the kind manner in which you speak of my Nephew. I hope you will always consider expressions of my good will in such cases as perfectly subordinate to public considerations, and superi[o]r pretensions. In the present case I am not sure that the appt. of my nephew to the place in question ought to be desired even by himself, unless Col:...
Your favor enclosing Act. Sales & invoice came safe to hand. The articles sent are liable to no objection except that some of them are rather of a superior sort & of course, price, than was in view. I have arranged with Mr. Mackay, the balance due from me so as [to] stand debited in his books for it. The sales of the Tobo. did not fully meet expectation. That of the best quality it was thought...
I have received your letter of Feby. 27. inclosing the appointment of me as a Visitor of the University of Virginia. However indisposed to public trusts, for which I am aware that every day is unfitting me, I can not decline a participation in the care of an Institution so honorable to the Public Councils of the State, and so auspicious to the coming generations of its Citizens. Should the...
A letter from Mrs. Dallas has just come under my eye, by which I find she is subsisting on very scanty resources, and is under impressions that two of her sons particularly, are not as well off as the public services of their father, and their own personal worth had promised. The elder one belonging to the Navy has, it seems, been a considerabl⟨e⟩ time without a ship. The other, George, tho’...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 21 inst I am aware of the wish you naturally feel for such a biographical sketch of me as will preserve a uniformity in your Gallery; and I am glad that you are sensible of the controul I may feel in supplying materials for it. A friend will attempt a brief chronicle of my career, with perhaps a few remarks & references, and will forward the paper when...
Your favor of the 18th. was handed to me by your servant, at a moment & place which did not permit me to acknowlege it by him. We regretted very much the circumstances which deprived us of the expected pleasure of seeing you all on your way to Washington. I inclose the copy of your letter to Gen: Jackson. Your reasonings on the singular step taken by him can scarcely fail to convince him of...
I have duly recd. yours of the 27th. Ulto. I am very sorry that I shall not be able to have the pleasure of joining you at the Meeting of the Visitors. We must await therefore that of seeing you & Mrs. M. on your way to Washington; and hope you will set out in time to spare us some days. The communications from Mr. Rush are very interesting. G. B. seems so anxious to secure the general trade...
Yours of Feby. 23. was not recd. before the last mail tho’ having the Aldie post mark on the day of its date. Whether it was not duly forwarded, or was so long overlooked at the office here is not known. The latter was probably the case. We hope the agreeable information you gave of Mrs. Monroe’s convalescence has been justified by, her entire recovery. I need not now say that I recd. at the...
Your letter of the 20th. Ult. was not recd. till yesterday afternoon. I find on recurring to my files and my memory, that I can afford no evidence of the fact in question. I have nothing from the pen of Docr. Shepherd that alludes to it. In a letter of april 7th 1821. He says “A family of the negroes that belonged to my brothers Estate have been taken back for the benefit of Betsy Shepherd: if...
Among the names which are presented for consideration in filling the vacant Chair in the University is that of Thomas H. Levins, now of New York, formerly of the District of Columbia, where he was Professor of Mathematics in the College. Letters in his favor are recd. from Mr. Calhoun, Genl. McComb, and Mr. A. H. Powell who I suppose is the present Member of Congress of that name. Whatever be...
I have recd. from Mr. Lear engaged in settling the accounts of General Hull, a request of what I may recollect on the question, whether there was a stipulation or understanding, that the General was to receive his salary as Governour, as well as his military pay. I have simply answered that my memory does not furnish any evidence which ought to influence the decision of the question. As the...
I recd. yours of the 10th. with a full sense of your kindness in taking so much interest in my health. Subsequent to your call on me, I had a return of fever which reduced me to a state of greater weakness than I had before experienced. For several weeks passed, have been on the recovery in strength as well as health; and if no relapse takes place, I may be able to give my attendance at...
I am requested by Mr. Elkanah Watson of Albany to forward to each of the Presidents of Agricultural Societies in Virginia, a blank Copy, such as is inclosed, of “a certificate of Honorable Testimony”; apologizing for the indirect transmission, by his not knowing the gentlemen for whom the copies are intended. The request is accompanied with information, that the Publishers Rawdon & Balch being...
I recd. in the due time your letter of Aug. 11. But in my present condition I have been obliged to spare the use of the pen as much as possible, especially when an answer was not pressing, and I could give none that could be of much importance. It may well be supposed that at my age, and after a lapse of nearly 30 years, my memory must be a very fallible resort for information as to...
I recd by the last mail a letter from J. H. Causten, accompanied by a huge volume of Documents, and a stout pamphlet of arguments, with a printed letter to him from Mr. Pickering, on the mercantile claims agst. France and the release of her from them by the U.S. All these articles have been doubtless sent to you also, as I am requested by Mr. C. to forward the inclosed Certificate of Agency,...
I have recd. your letter of the 19. and have looked over the printed Statement of Mr. Simpson which it enclosed. I leave to the files of the Dept. whatever information may concern the facts of his case, as more to be relied on than my memory. I say very cheerfully however that during the periods of my public service at Washingto[n] Mr. Simpson was always regarded as a faithful and very useful...
Mr. Morris who was employed for several years on a confidential Mission to Spain, observes to me that in executing the trust, he incurred expences, particularly in being transferred from Cadiz to Madrid, and during his residence at the latter place, which in the then circumstances of Spain were great beyond foresight, and moreover in providing a Clerk for whose services he had occasion: and he...
Mr. Ths. Lehré of S. C. is a candidate for the vacant Collectorship of Charleston, and writes that I shd bear some testimony to you in favor of his pretensions. Not having any personal knowlege of him this can relate only to his political sentiments and conduct as they were from time to time communi[ca]ted to me, and to the general standing which I have understood him to possess with his...
Since we left the university I have recd. the letter from Mr. Gallatin, of which the inclosed is a copy. It gives no prospect of a supply for the vacant chair from that quarter, and I have no additional information from any other. A few lines from Mr. Ringold as he passed thro’ the neighbourhood, mentioned that you had suffered a sharp attack after you reached home not unlike mine, but was,...
Your favor of the 9th. did not come to hand till the evening before the last. From a communication just had with my nephew, I find that he is anxious not to lose the chance of the Secretariship to the Board under the Treaty, and seems to be encouraged in his hopes by his friend Col: Barbour. It will be agreeable to him therefore, if not objectionable, that his appt. to the other place you...