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    • Madison, James
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    • Clay, Henry
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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Clay, Henry" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I have received the copy of your Speech on “American Industry” for which I pray you to accept my thanks. I find in it a full measure of the ability & eloquence so often witnessed on preceding occasions. But whilst doing this justice to the task you have performed, which I do with pleasure as well as sincerity, candor obliges me to add that I can not concur in the extent to which the pending...
I was lately called on by Docr. Waugh a physician in this quarter esteemed for his professional skill, with a request that I would name his son to the proper Dept. as an applicant for bearing public dispatches abroad, should there be occasion for such a service. The youth is represented as of promising talents & character. The wish to procure for him some employment, which will carry him...
Since I took the liberty of mentioning to you the name of young Mr. Waugh who wishes to be a bearer of public despatches, and whom you kindly promised to keep in view for consideration, I have learned that he is younger than I was aware and probly without that sort of knowledge of the world which would be useful at any age, and could alone supply the want of age. It is quite proper that I...
I am very sorry that a lapse of attention on my part, shd. have given you the trouble denoted in yours of the 13th. The communication inadvertently addressed to you was intended for your colleague of the War Department, to whom as existing Presidt. of the Agricultural Society of Albemarle, the Botanical Box ought to have been transmitted. I must ask the favor of you to hand over to him the...
After your kind offer, I make no apology for inclosing another letter which I wish to have the advantage of a conveyance from the Department of State. Its object is to obtain from Mr. Gallatin a small service for our University, and that with as little delay as may be. Whilst I was charged with the Department of State, the British doctrine against a neutral trade with belligerent ports shut in...
The pamphlets accompanying your favor of the 4th. have been duly recd. and I thank you for the obliging attention to my request on that subject. Mr. Brent does not mention his expence in procuring, them. It shall be remitted on his notice of the amount. Having occasion to make an addition to my last letter to Mr. Gallatin, I avail myself again of the medium with which you indulge me. With...
J. M. presents his respectful complts to Mr. Clay, with another resort to his obliging promise, by enclosed letter to the Ama. Minister at Paris. Draft, with the draft of JM to James Brown, April 12, 1827 (DLC) .
I have duly recd. the copy of your Address politely forwarded to me. Altho’ I have taken no part in the depending contests and have been led to place myself publickly on that ground, I could not peruse the Appeal you have made without being sensible of the weight of testimony it exhibits, and of the eloquence by which it is distinguished. Having occasion to write to Mr. Brougham on a subject...
I have received yours of the 20th. inclosing the letter of Mr. Tracie. He had before made a direct application for the Classical Professorship in our University, and will of course be taken into due consideration with the other candidates. Notwithstanding the number of them, we shall not, I fear, find one who will replace as well as succeed Mr. Long now in that Chair, whose eminent...
I have duly recd. your letter of the 10th. inst. on the subject of Mr. Trist son in law to Mrs. Randolph, of whose qualifications for a Clerkship in the Department of State you wish me to judge. This young gentleman is I believe, regarded by all best acquainted with him, as possessing a fine understanding, as respectable for his scientific and literary accomplishments, as of strict honor &...
I have just been favored with yours of the 22d. Ult: enclosing a copy of your Address delivered at Cincinnati. Without concurring in every thing that is said, I feel what is due to the ability and eloquence which distinguish the whole. The rescue of the Resolutions of Kentucky in -98 & 99. from the misconstruction of them, was very a propos; that authority being particularly relied on, as an...
I have just recd. from the Revd. Mr. Beasly, lately at the Head of the University in Philad. a request that I would drop you a few lines on the subject of his application for the vacant Presidentcy in the University at Lexington. My personal knowledge of Mr. B. is very slight, and that of his literary publications too much so, to admit of a competent judgment of his merits. That they disclose...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr Clay thanks him for the Copy of his speech "In Defence of the American System &c" It is a very able, a very eloquent, and a very interesting one. If it does not establish all its positions, in all their extent, it demolishes not a few of those relied on by the opponents. J. M. feels a pleasure in offering this tribute to its merits. But he must be...
I have duly recd. yours of the 17th. Altho you kindly release me from a reply, it may be proper to say that some of the circumstances to which you refer were not before known to me. On the great question before Congress, on which so much depends out of Congress, I ought the less to obtrude an opinion, as its merits essentially depend on details which I never investigated, and of which I am an...
Accept my acknowledgements for the copy of your Speech on the bill modifying the Tariff. I need not repeat what is said by all, on the ability and advantage with which the Subject was handled. It has certainly had the effect of an Anodyne on the feverish excitement under which the public mind was laboring; & a relapse may happily not ensue. There is no certainty however that a surplus revenue...
Your letter of May 28th. was duly received. In it you ask my opinion on the retention of the land bill by the President. It is obvious that the Constitution meant to allow the President an adequate time to consider the bills &co. presented to him, and to make his objections to them; and on the other hand that Congress should have time to consider and overrule the objections. A disregard on...
Perceiving that I am indebted to you for a copy of your Report on our Relations with France, I beg you to accept this return of my thanks for it. The document is as able in its execution, as it is laudable in its object of avoiding war without incurring dishonor. It must be the wish of all that the issue may correspond with the object. But may not a danger of rupture lurk under the conflicting...