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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I sincerely regret that we happen to see the same subject in lights so very different, with respect to the mill . but the rent of a real property must, you know, be a fixt thing. as it’s original cost cannot be varied, so the interest or rent on that cannot vary with daily and transient occurrences, and especially on a lease for time. it is easy to reduce a rent, but impossible to raise it...
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. we should have recognised the stile even without a signature and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. this is a sample of the effects we...
Your letter of Sep. 11., original and duplicate, was recieved a few days ago, and I have notice that the books arrived at New York with the letters. I propose, the ensuing year to employ the annual sum I devote to these objects in an importation from London of some English books which I have long wanted; and therefore shall intermit the application of that year to you—as I very much desire...
Long indulgence by your predecessors in the direction of the department of State in the privilege of getting my letters to Europe put under the same cover with their the official dispatches of the department has encoraged me to ask the same favor of you. my increasing aversion to writing will be a security against any abuse of this favor. on this ground I take the liberty of inclosing a letter...
I have just now recieved your favor of Jan. 30. and confirm, by my belief, mr Jay’s criticism on the passages quoted from Botta. I can answer for it’s truth from this state Southwardly, and Northwardly, I believe, to New York, for which state mr Jay is himself a competent witness. what, Eastward of that, might be the dispositions towards England before the commencement of hostilities I know...
I have duly received your favor of the 11 th with the description it covered of the Otsego Basse. born and bred among mountains, I have had less opportunity of becoming acquainted with the fishy tribe, however interesting, than with any other the objects of natural history. I should expect that the great inland seas of our country, insulated as they are, would furnish many examples of...
My last to you was of Apr. 4 . which went by duplicates. since that I have recieved yours of Apr. 29. Aug. 26. and Nov. 10. the accident which delayed the reciept of the bill of exchange for M. and M e Pini has been the subject of infinite regret and mortification to me; there being nothing on which my attention is more religiously fixed than on the punctual remittance of the annual interest...
Age and debility after a recent illness oblige Th: Jefferson to borrow the pen of another to thank Col o Lehré for his kind letter of July 5. to assure him of the gratification it affords him to learn that those who have thought well of him continue their kind dispositions and that those who have thought otherwise begin to change opinions. he never had a wish but for the good of all his...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Gardiner and his thanks for the handsome Map of the Alabama territory , which he has been so kind as to send him . the rapid advance of that portion of our country into notice and estimation renders it now entirely interesting. he salutes mr Gardiner with esteem and respect. PoC ( MHi ); on verso of reused address cover of Charles Willson Peale to...
Your favor of June 26. is just now recieved. after the delays of my last bond with which I have been indulged I consider it my bounden duty to obey the call for the principal whenever required. this delay was at first made convenient by the great revolution which took place in our circulating medium some time past; and the continuance of low markets since that period has not yet relieved the...
I am the more indebted for your friendly letter of Feb. 13. mentioning the charges against Cathalan , because a long, an intimate and personal acquaintance with him interest my wishes for his welfare, so far as justice permits; while I certainly should not be his advocate if guilty of serious delinquencies of office. but I observe that all these complaints have originated since mr Fitch began...
I cannot but have appeared remiss in my acknolmts of the several lres with which you have favored me, but the obstructions have been insuperable much sickness the accident of a broken arm, weakness of body and octogenary intertitude. no letters are more welcome to me than yours, and none should I answer more cordially were my powers now equal to it. you have labored for us too much and too...
I am lately returned from the warm springs with my health entirely prostrated by the use of the waters. they produced an imposthume and eruptions which with the torment of the journey back reduced me to the last stage of weakness and exhaustion. I am getting better, but still obliged to lie night and day in the same reclined posture which renders writing painful. I cannot be at Poplar Forest...
Aug. 24. 1825. wrote to B. Peyton for the under written articles [the following not in TJ’s hand] : One full sized silver catheter. Two or three full sized elastic gum catheters. MHi .
I am much indebted to you, gentlemen, for your attention and civility in the notice I recieve from you of a cask of garden seeds from Marseilles, supposed to be intended for me. but I think it probable the Capt n was mistaken in supplying from his memory the defacement of the address on the cask. I never had a correspondent in Marseilles but mr Cathalan our late Consul and his successors, and...
The impracticability of giving special answers to the numerous enquiries of the charater of your favor of Nov. 27. obliges me to refer them for answers to an advertisement which will be put into the public papers the moment of the arrival of the professors we have engaged from England. one is arrived, and the rest are known to have sailed in a ship the Competitor from London bound to Norfolk...
It is long since I have ceased to read any newspaper but yours , and I shall continue to read no other. withdrawing therefore from all others I pray you to have me discontinued as a subscriber to the Compiler. should the legislature have the report of the University Commissioners printed in a pamphlet be so good as to send me half a dozen copies. mr Gibson as usual will pay you for these as...
Th Jefferson returns his thanks to D r Sewall for the information he has been so kind as to furnish him of the institution of a Medical school in the College of Columbia. he sincerely wishes it success and that it may have it’s share in the merit of lessening the afflictions of mankind. he is particularly obliged to him for his interesting account of the medical institutions of our country. we...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for the copy you have been so kind as to send me of the letter to your constituents on the Missouri question. it is a perfect justification to them. I had for a long time ceased to read newspapers or pay any attention to public affairs, confident they were in good hands, and content to be a passenger in our bark to the shore from which I am not distant. but this...
Resolved that the Governor be requested to have prepared and laid before the legislature at their next meeting a statement in detail of the sum of education which, under the law establishing primary schools, has been rendered in the schools of each county respectively and for every year from the passage of the law to the present one inclusive: that it be stated in a Tabular form, in the first...
I must beg to be excused from answering the question proposed to me in your favor of the 11 th inst. on the subject of the Candidates named for the next Presidency. I lay it down as a law to myself to take no part in that election. advice on such an occasion, were I even qualified to give it, would incur a fearful responsibility. I shall be perfectly contented with any choice my fellow...
Thoughts on Lotteries, and that on particularly which is now asked It is a common idea that games of chance are immoral. but what is Chance? nothing happens in this world without a cause. if we know the cause , we do not call it chance; but if we do not know it we say it was produced by Chance. if we see a lo a ded die turn it’s lightest side up, we know the cause and that it is not an effect...
I recieved this morning your favor of the 17 th have got the correct bills signed by D r Everett, now inclose them and hope they will get to hand before my draught in favor of White gets round to you. the 56. 31 and 88 D. curtail must be retained out of the proceeds of the bill of Exchange, I had in mr G.’s hands at the last statement of our accounts but about 30. D. and he may have paid some...
Your favor of Apr. 12. came to hand on the 23 d instant. withdrawn by the effect of age, from the labors of correspondence to which that has rendered me unequal, I am able only to forward your letter and communication to a member of the American Philosophical society at Philadelphia . it is long since I resigned the office of their President, and D r Wistar , who succeeded me is lately dead,...
Your favor of the 10 th was not recieved till the instant, and I regret that it is not in my power to send you the Egyptian wheat which is the subject of your letter. I recieved it while I lived in Washington, and having no means of taking care of such things there, I generally sent them to some one of my careful neighbors. I do not recollect to whom of them I sent this particular article, but...
copy of Paragraph from The Presid’s lre of Mar. 22. and extract from my answer of this day. MHi .
Your letter of Nov. 26. is recieved and enables me to ascertain the amount of the cost of the books I have rec d and those I wish now to be forwarded, and I accordingly inclose you 90. Dollars in bills of the bank of the US. in Philadelphia . I shall subjoin the list of the books, and the prices as I read them in your several letters. you will observe that I desire a 2 d copy of Planche ’s...
Your favor of July 16. came to hand yesterday evening only, and I feel much indebted to the President for having thought of me, & to yourself for giving me an opportunity of procuring a supply of the Lawler wheat for seed. I have heard much of it’s superior security from the fly, and indeed known something of it from an example in my own neighborhood. how it may stand in comparison with our...
Yours of the 24 th was recieved yesterday. the clause of arbitration in the lease was a sufficient provision between Shoemaker and my self because we understood every part of it in the same way. so it was with mr Randolph & M c Kinney. but you and myself differ so materially and in so many points that to enter into a contract with opposite meanings & to propose to go thro’ it by arbitrations...
On the reciept of your letter of the 15 th I communicated it to mr Leitch for the information of those whom it concerned for as I have before informed you, I have no interest in this business, nor any other concern than that of good will to the young man. the accident of a first application to mr Lee for quite a different object made me the channel of communication between in this business. mr...
You have heretofore known that the ability of the University to meet the necessary expences of a bell and clock, depended on the remission by Congress, of the duties on marble bases and capitels used in our buildings, a sum of nearly 3000,D. the remission is granted, and I am now authorised to close with mr Willard for the undertaking of the clock, as proposed in your letter of Aug. 25. I must...
I have been long waiting in the hope of picking up a 5.D. bill of the US. bank to remit you according to the account transmitted to you me thro’ mr Patterson : but in vain. our inland & uncommercial situation offers nothing but the paper of our state banks: to prevent further delay therefore I inclose you a Richmond 5.D. note and as the banks of every state are at discount in all others, I add...
Yours of the 6 th is rec e ived. I set out the day after tomorrow for Poplar Forest , and shall be there till the 1 st of May . you say you will be at home the 25 th . I really think Francis had better come on diret direct
I am indebted to you, Sir, for the copy you have been so kind as to send me of your preliminary lecture on the philosophy of language; and still more for the flattering sentiments expressed in the dedication. the bloodless revolution of 1801. in the principles of the administration of our government, restored them to what cost much blood in 1776. and subsequently. but you ascribe to me more...
I have recieved a letter from Philadelphia which very much affects our arrangements for this year. mr Ware on whom we relied to come himself and brick bring brickmakers & layers to do a whole range of buildings was it seems under embarrassing circumstances, & on it’s being known that he was coming here, he was arrested by his creditors & was in jail at the date of the letter. what are we to...
I have just recieved a letter from mr Dearborn collector of Boston informing me he had forwarded to your office 3. boxes of wine from Marseilles, noting the amount of duties & freight at 17. D 05. c this sum I have requested Capt Peyton to remit to him immediately and to pay any additional expences incurr and the object of the present letter is to ask the favor of you to have the boxes...
The subject of your letter of May 20. has attracted more notice certainly than it merited. that the opern to which it refers, was painful to a certain degree I admit, but it was shor-tlived, and there would have ended as to myself. my age and the state of my health at that time gave an alarm to my family which I neither felt nor expressed. what may have been said in newspapers I know not,...
I have no doubt you have occasionally been led to reflect on the character of the duty imposed by Congress on the importation of books. Some few years ago, when the tariff was before Congress, I engaged some of our members of Congress to endeavor to get the duty repealed, and wrote on the subject to some other acquaintances in Congress, and pressingly to the Secretary of the treasury. The...
Successive circumstances too long to be detailed in a letter, have prevented me hitherto for p from proposing a meeting of the Visitors of the College . that of the Visitors of the University being postponed to the 29 th of March renders our immediate meeting indispensable. I therefore propose to you to be at mr Madison ’s on in the forenoon of Friday next the 26 th
When we began our buildings at our University, we adopted it as a rule that we would be governed in all our prices by those established by long experience & due competn in Phila, and you were so bind as to procure & send me the printed book of Carpenter’s prices, in the other branches of work we have been able in different ways to learn your prices, except those of plaisterer ’s work, of these...
I sincerely join in the general joy on the passage of the University bill , and by such majorities as bespeak a friendly patronage hereafter. in a letter of this date to mr Cabell I have requested him to send me a copy of the bill that the visitors may meet and do at once what the law permits them to do, as the season for engagements is rapidly passing off. but we shall fall miserably short in...
By a letter of Jan. 1. from mr Joshua Dodge our Consul at Marseilles he informs me that sometime before that date he had shipped for me some wines and other articles on board the brig Union of Marblehead. he does not say that she was bound to Marblehead or to what port. but as she has been long out and I have heard nothing of her I have hoped you would do me the kindness to inform me whether...
By this day’s mail I forward you ⅓ of a parcel of seeds of the Sea-Kale sent here by Gen l Cock for you, mr Divers & myself. I feared to await a private conveyance because they lose their vegetative power if not planted soon. The day after you left us I was taken with a cholic which attended with a stricture on the upper bowels brought me into great pain & immediate danger. the obstacle was at...
Your favor of the 8 th is recieved with my acc t from July 10. to that day. these accounts alone enable me to settle my flour rents with those who owe them, and to know if they have delivered all which should be delivered. in proceeding to this examination for the last year, I am stopped short by a chasm in the acc ts which I possess from the 13 th of April to the 10 th of July. for this...
Memorandum of the expence of one Range of dormitories done with wood—99. feet long— 4972 feet heart pine scantling @ 5$ = $.248 =60 23–m. shingles 22. In long @ 4$= 72 timber for Do—@ $1.25/100 pr. m. 28 75 hauling scantling 10. miles 18. days @ 5$ = 90 – hauling shingles 11. days @ 5$ = 55 . { 38 Squares framing Roof in cludeing guttering Joist
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 2 d and should be very glad to bear witness to any truth which might establish your just claim to the property of your grandmother in this country. but I know nothing of any visit of your grandfather to it before the revolution, and unless you have very positive proof I should doubt it. because I was much in Williamsburg about that time. I should still...
I recieve with due sensibility the mark of attention which the benevolent institution , in whose name your letter of the 21 st is written, has been pleased to manifest, by proposing me as an honorary member of their institution. aged, & distant as I am little benefit to the society can result from my services: but such as they may be will be at their command. of this Sir, be pleased to assure...
I recieve here your favor of the 20 th expressing your desire to enlarge your stock of knolege, than which nothing can be more commendable; but I should not think your purpose of attending an Instructor at all necessary. we have now such excellent elementary books in every branch of science as to make every subject as plain as a teacher can make it. in Natural philosophy we have Joyce’s...
Thomas Jefferson Plaintiff against } Upon an Attachment Joseph Gilmier Defendant The Plaintiff having obtained an attachment against the Defendant for the sum of Ten pounds and the Sheriff haveing returned the attachment executed on one negro girl Cornelia of the estate of the said Defendant; the Defendant was solemnly called, but came not; Therefore it is considered by the Court that the...
The most calamitous event which could happen to my family would be my death intestate; and prudence even requires that I should guard against the possibility of accident to my will by fire or otherwise were a single copy to be trusted to any where. I ask therefore the friendly office of you to recieve a duplicate in deposit for safe keeping and assure you of my affectionate friendship and...