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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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The reasons assigned in your favor of the 7 th for preferring to retain Loudon instead of Albemarle are such as cannot be controverted. the society of our children is the sovereign balm of life, and the older we grow the more we need it, to fill up the void made by the daily losses of the companions and friends of our youth. nor ought we of this neighborhood to regret a preference so conducive...
I have been lately visited by a mr Miralla, a native of Buenes Ayres, but resident in Cuba for the last 7. or 8. years, a person of intelligence, of much information, and frankly communicative. I believe indeed he is known to you. I availed myself of the opportunity of learning what was the state of public sentiment in Cuba as to their future course. he says they would be satisfied to remain...
I forward to you the inclosed letter on the same ground on which it is addressed to me, and not that Duane has any Moral claims on us. his defection from the republican ranks, his transition to the Federalists, and giving triumph, in an important state, to wrong over right, have dissolved, of his own seeking, his connection with us. yet the energy of his press, when our cause was laboring, and...
The question presented by the letters you have sent me is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of independance that made us a nation; this sets our compass, and points the course which we are to steer thro’ the ocean of time opening on our view. and never could we embark on it under circumstances more auspicious. our first and fundamental maxim should...
Mr. Girardin, president of the college of Baltimore understanding that the office of librarian to Congress is expected to become vacant by resignn, and desirous of being placed in it, has requestd me to state to you what I know of his qualifns. he lived at Milton in this nbhood 2 or 3. y. while writing his hist. of Virga, and was during that time in great intercourse and intimacy, with my...
The inclosed letter is from a person entirely unknown to me; yet it seems to expect a confidence which prudence could give to a stranger. and as he seems to write under your authority, I take the liberty of confiding my answer to yourself directly, and of returning his paper to you. I do not know that the publication of the papers of the old Congress could be objected to, except such as might...
The multiplied sollicitations to interest myself with you for applicants for office have been uniformly refused by me . in a few cases only where facts have been within my knolege, I have not been able to refuse stating them as a witness, which I have made a point to do so drily as that you might understand that I took no particular interest in the case. in a conversation with you however, at...
I recieve mr Livingston’s question through you with kindness, and answer it without hesitation. he may be assured I have not a spark of unfriendly feeling towards him. in all the earlier scenes of life we thought and acted together. we differed in opinion afterwards on a single point. each maintained his opinion, as he had a right, and acted on it as he ought. but why brood over a single...
I took the liberty some time last fall of placing mr Duane your notice, should any thing occur adapted to his qualifications, and to his situation, which I understood to be needy in the extreme. his talents and information are certainly great, the services he rendered us when we needed them, and his personal sacrifices and sufferings were signal and efficacious, and left on us a moral duty not...
My friend Col o Peyton, passing thro’ Washington on a trip to the North, will pay his respects to you with this letter. he is the same for whom I have heretofore sollicited you, and still sollicit you to keep him in mind for either of the two offices in Richmond which may first become vacant. I shall hope a fortnight or three weeks previous notice of your visit to this neighborhood that I may...
I have duly rec d your favor of the 12 th inst. and concur in every sentim t you express on the subject of mine of the 2 d they were exactly what I should have said to you myself had our places been changed. my lre was meant only to convey the wishes of the party, and in few cases where circumstances have obliged me to communicate sollicitns have I ever suffered my own wishes to mingle with...
I inclose you a letter from Thomas Lieper, the Doyen, you know of the genuine republicans of Pensylva, who, on the prospect that the Director of the mint is about closing the term of his life, wishes that Doct r Patterson son of the Director, could be appointed his successor. my testimony in his favor is not from personal acquaintance, but from the information of others which is very highly in...
The moment, my dear friend, is come which I was so anxious should happen in your time. the office of P.M. in Richm d is become vacant by the long expected death of the incumbent, and I cannot omit to urge my former suits in behalf of Col o Peyton. in the several cases in which I have been forced to hand to you the names of sollicitants for office I never suffered my wishes to go beyond the...
I have examined my letter of Jan. 13. 1803. as well as the indistinct copy given by the copying press permits. in some parts it is illegible. the publication of the whole of the 1 st paragraph would merit very serious consideration as respects myself. written when party passions and contests were at their highest, and expressing freely to you with whom I had no reserve, my opinion of the views...
Your favor of the 2 d was rec d on the 16 th inst. together with the herb which accompanied it, and I am much indebted for the kind interest you take in my present indisposn, as also to mr Hooe & mr Buchner for their frdly attentions. I have submitted the plant to the inspection of D r D. my physician who recognises in it what is called Agrimony, with the use of which he is not unacquainted in...
Your favor of Jan. 15. is recieved, and I am entirely sensible of the kindness of the motives which suggested the caution it recommends. but I believe what I have done is the only thing I could have done with honor or conscience. mr Gilmer requested me to state a fact which he knew himself, and of which he knew me to be possessed. what use he intended to make of it I knew not, nor had I a...
Your favor of the 13 th was recieved yesterday. your use of my letter with the alterations subsequently proposed, needs no apology. and it will be a gratification to me if it can be of any service to you. I learn with sincere affliction the difficulties with which you have still to struggle—mine are considerable—but the single permission given me by the legislature of such a mode of sale as...
I have duly recieved your two favors of Feb.23. and 27. and am truly sensible of the interest you so kindly take in my affair, and of the encoraging aspect of mr Gouverneur’s letter. all that is necessary for my relief is a succesful sale of our tickets, of which the public papers give good hope. if this is effected, at a reasonable value for what I shall sell, what will remain will leave me...
The use you have made of my letters needed no apology. they were in fact public in their nature. had not my memory so totally left me, I have no doubt I might supply from that source whatever may be defective in the extracts you have made, for altho’ I cannot say I recollect the actual fact, yet from my knolege of myself I am conscious that a compliance with your request to return home was so...