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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Monroe, James
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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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I shall not waste your time in idle congratulations. you know my joy on the commitment of the helm of our government to your hands. I promised you, when I should have recieved and tried the wines I had ordered from France and Italy , to give you a note of the kinds which I should think worthy of your procurement: and this being the season for ordering them, so that they may come in the mild...
The reciept of a commission as Visitor , will have informed you, if you did not know it before, that we have in contemplation to establish a College near Charlottesville . by the act of assembly which fixes our constitution , it is to be under the direction of 6. visitors. your commission has informed you you were one of these, & your colleagues are mr Madison , Gen l Cocke , mr Joseph C....
Finding subsequently, what had not been before attended to that the law had appointed the 1 st day of our Spring & Autumn District court for the stated meetings of the Visitors of the Central College , it is concluded that our meeting should be on the 5 th instead of the 6 th of May (noted in my letter of the 13 th ) and that being the 1 st day of both our County & District courts, the...
The wine called Scuppernon (or some name like that) is made as I am informed on the South side of Albemarle Sound , on & near a creek of that name. it is easily procured by a correspondent in Norfolk with which place Scuppernon has a short and direct communication by water. I had asked the favor of mr H. G. Burton of N. Carolina to procure me a correspondent from whom I could get regular...
I recieved last night a letter from M. Cathalan inclosing that for the Secretary of the Navy which I now forward to you. it was left open for my perusal with a request to stick a wafer in it & to forward it. the wish that I should know it’s contents, and the trouble of copying so long a dispatch are I suppose his apology for this little irregularity. it proves the intrigues of Fitch , the...
There will be some cases wherein it will be out of my power to refuse my testimony of worth to applicants for appointment, who may request me to say to you what I know of them. to these solicitations however I shall never yield, nor become troublesome to you but where the claims on me are peculiar. I do not know whether you were acquainted with George Stevenson while he pursued in our...
Our Visitors determined to make a report to the Governor as their patron, of the progress and prospects of our College , with a view to place it before the legislature for their aid or adoption. I have this moment, and at this place prepared such a report, but as it will be some time before it can go the rounds of all the visitors for their signatures, your greater distance requires the...
I am the more indebted for your friendly letter of Feb. 13. mentioning the charges against Cathalan , because a long, an intimate and personal acquaintance with him interest my wishes for his welfare, so far as justice permits; while I certainly should not be his advocate if guilty of serious delinquencies of office. but I observe that all these complaints have originated since mr Fitch began...
I thank you, dear Sir, for the opportunity of perusing the inclosed, which I return without delay. it looks well, and when they know the whole of the affair of Pensacola , I have no doubt they will withdraw all idea of intermedling between Spain & us. I think trust we shall be able to avoid entanglement with the European alliance. we may let them alone for they can n ot conquer the S....
Amant Spreafico , of Nice , to be Consul of that place instead of Victor Adolphus Sasserno deceased. The above is the name of the person at Nice who wishes to be our Consul. he is a very respectable merchant of the place, was connected in the commerce of Sasserno the father , was left guardian of Sasserno the son , the late Consul, and still I believe continues in the same firm & business....
I recieved last night a letter from Cathalan of Aug. 13. informing me he had just recieved some boxes of wine for me from Sasserno , who, of course was then living: but he had not yet recieved his Consular commission. it will be better therefore to await further information, and the rather as, if he be dead, I shall be sure to hear it from Cathalan or Spreafico . perhaps indeed it might be...
You oblige me infinitely, dear Sir, by sending me the Congressional documents in pamphlet form. for as they come out by peice-meal in the newspapers I never read them. and indeed I read no newspapers now but Ritchie ’s, and in that chiefly the advertisements, as being the only truths we can rely on in a newspaper. but in a pamphlet, where we can go thro’ the whole subject when once taken up,...
With the transmission of two of the inclosed letters I have to apologise for having torn the cover leaves from their letter leaves before I discovered they were addressed to you. this operation I invariably practise on my own letters to economise stowage, and these being with others addressed to me under a general cover were submitted to the general operation before they were read. this...
On the failure of the house of Smith & Buchanan & their connections in Baltimore, Col o Robert Nicholas, who was doing business for them in Leghorn, was of course deprived of that employment. he was at the same time Navy-agent for the US. there. but that not affording a subsistence, he determined to return to his own country. in a letter of Aug. 17. from Poplar Forest, I took the liberty of...
What can I do, my dear friend, with such letters as the inclosed, but forward them to you? and the rather as I presume you must have known the merits of the writer as well as I did: that he was an active Whig and officer in the revolution of 1776. and a firm republican in that of 1800. I reject the numerous applications made to me to be troublesome to you; but now and then comes one which...
I am often placed under the dilemma of either alienating my old friends, or of giving you the trouble of reading a letter, and I have had too many proofs of your friendship not to know you will take that trouble to save me from so painful an alternative. I know your difficulties, and after giving my testimony, I pay no attention to the result, leaving that to yourself who alone have a view of...
Your favor of the 3 d is recieved and always with welcome these texts of truth relieve me from the floating falsehoods, of the public papers. I confess to you I am not sorry for the non-ratification of the Spanish treaty. our assent to it has proved our desire to be on friendly terms with Spain; their dissent, the inabecility and malignity of their government towards us. that have placed them...
Th: J. to the President Instead of the unintelligible sketch I gave you the other day, I send it drawn more at large, mrs Monroe & yourself may take some hints from it for a better plan of your own . this supposes 10.f. in front, and 8.f in flank added to your sills. a flat of 12.f. square is formed at the top, to make your present rafters answer, & to lighten the appearance of the roof....
Our University asks a kind attention from you. you doubtless know that our legislature constituted the debt due to them from the US. into a literary fund, for the purposes of education, & that on this fund the University is established, and dependant. at their late session they authorised the Literary board to advance to the University 60,000.D. of the monies still to be recieved from the US....
You have seen announced in several of our papers an intention of the Polonese nation to erect a monument near Cracow to the memory of Gen l Koscuzko, and their wish that England and the US. by joining in contributions, might give a proof of the interest they take in his character; that for this purpose, they had addressed a letter to L d Holland in Engl d and to myself in the US. I recieved in...
I recieved your letter at dusk, when no candle was lighted, & not suspecting your so sudden departure told the servant not to wait for an—answer, & that I would send it. I hope I shall be able to send the papers in the morning before you will have departed. The letter of Lewis shews that Barron is a most unprincipled men, and the sentence of the court shews him unworthy of any military trust....
D r Wallis of Fauquier with whom I think you are acquainted seems desirous as his years advance to associate with his medical pursuits or perhaps substitute for them some employment which might relieve or lessen their labors. in what character of business his choice or opportunity might lead him to engage I do not know; but his talents & informs qualify him for a large range and his integrity...
I do not know by what individuals the association was formed which is the subject of the inclosed letter to mr Morse. I suppose them to have been few and private, and that the undertaking must have been on too partial a view of the subject. I observe your name not on the roll, and for a reason too light to have been the true one: and I suspect therefore it has been refused for good reasons. be...
Your favor of Mar. 14. has been duly recieved. in that you ask if my letter to mr Morse may be communicated to the gentlemen of the administration and other friends. in the first place the former are entitled to it’s communication from mr Morse as named members of his society. but independantly of that, a letter addressed to a society of 6. or 8000 people is de facto made public. I had...
I have made it a rule, and have pretty steadfas tly ob observed it, not to permit myself to be used as an instrument to trouble and embarras the government with sollicitations for office. now & then however a case occurs which from pecu lia r circumstances, cannot be declined. still I wish it always to be understood that I ask no departure from what justice, or the necessary rules of...
I thank you, Dear Sir, for the opportunity of reading mr Taylor’s letter, which I now return. news that one can rely on from a country with which we have so little intercourse, and so much mutual interest is doubly grateful. I rejoice to learn that Iturbide’s is a mere usurpation and slenderly supported. altho we have no right to intermeddle with the form of government of other nations yet it...
The inclosed answers your favor of the 29 th Ult. on the value of your lands. I had had great hopes that while in your present office you would break up the degrading practice of considering the President’s house as a general tavern, and economise sufficiently to come out of it clear of difficulties. I learn the contrary with great regret. your society during the little time I have left would...
Your favor of Jan. 29. did not get to hand till a few days past, and as I could not answer it without some information and the weather severe, I had to wait till it became a little milder, so that I could ride to the Highlands to make my enquiries. I recieved the information I asked from mr Landrum yesterday. I learn that within your lines are about 2000 acres of Carter’s antient patent,...
In answering a letter from mr Short I indulged myself in some off-hand speculations on the present lowering state of Europe, random enough to be sure; yet, on revising them, I thought I would hazard a copy to you, on the bare possibility that, out of them, you might, as we sometimes do from dreams, pick up some hint worth improving by your own reflection. at any rate the whole reverie will...
Considering that I had not been to Bedford for a twelve month before, I thought myself singularly unfortunate in so timing my journey as to have been absent exactly at the moment of your visit to our neighborhood. the loss indeed was all my own; for in these short interviews with you, I generally get my political compass rectified, learn from you whereabouts we are, and correct my course...