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    • Adams, John
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    • Boylston, Ward Nicholas
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Boylston, Ward Nicholas" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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O that I had the talent at description of a Homer a Milton or a Walter Scott I would give you a picture of a hill that I have visited with more pleasure than I should mount Ida or Monticello. Mr David Hyslop has been importuning me for seven years to dine with him in Brookline: I have always declined till last Tuesday when taking my grandson George Washington Adams for my guide and aid de camp...
The Emperiour of China quoted the precept of Confucius, give much, and take but little—but you have adopted another maxim, give much, and take nothing—for I have nothing to give—but I am too proud to receive so much with all the gratitude that is due without returning any-thing—Here is a Box of Cegars which I have not dared to open though I suppose they are as odoriferous as an incensoir of a...
I am suffering under a bitter repentance in neglecting to write & thank you for your last kind letter & for the valuable present of Cider whose only fault is that too good I am obliged to mix more than half water with it— I begin to look forward with great delight to the prospect of your return to Roxbury with Mrs Boylston, hoping that you both will come and see me before I go hence, to be...
I revoke the appellation of Son—Your conduct to me is more like that of a tender affectionate partial and too indulgent a Father—than like that of a Cousin, or a Brother or a Son You overwhelm me so with your kindness that I have no expressions adequate to my sense of obligations I have received the two Barrels of Cider, and the Bottles of Wine which I shall reserve for the best use of which...
I have received your kind note of this afternoon. Mr De Wint and his family are all in Boston and are engaged there till next Saturday. It is utterly impossible for me to wait upon you in the present state of my health; nor in any case can I go with such an army as you have invited. All the strength nature has left me is not sufficient to endure it. Your kindness overwhelms me. My son said to...
I think it is Voltaire who some where says, the life of a Man of Letters ought to appear only in his writings, without any pretentions to the Character of a Man of letters—it has been my destiney to scribble a great deal—always in great haste, never revising or correcting any-thing—You desire a list of my publications—and I have given you incouragement to expect it—but I shall be accused of...
Not a word at present about your delicious Cider and flounders. Miss Farnam a Grand Daughter of my Ancient acquaintance of Sixty years standing and brother barrister at Law with whom I have rode many a painful Circuit Mr Farnham of Newbury port, is a bout to remove to Princetown, in the Character of a school mistress, and is to reside in the family of Mr Clark your Revnd Pastor, her Aunt Mrs...
I have been as Civil to Mr Lane who brought me your letter of 26. As I could. He dined with me and I was much pleased with him— I am sincerely grieved at your long continued indisposition, What can I do to restore your health—If you come to the Convention, as I hope you will; That I think will Cure you—For wrangling and Contention exhilarates the Spirits and Animates the Body—You will have...
I thank you for your favor of the 16th. It is impossible for me, as it was for Junius to recollect the innumerable trifles I have written. of those that were printed in the olden time of the Revolution I believe I could give a list—but nothing I ever printed or wrote in my whole life, is fit for the inspection of Posterity—all written in a hurry distracted with care, dispirited by...
I still breathe in great weakness, but in my latest breath I shall wish for your health and prosperity and that of all your family. As to giving you advice concerning your concerns at Harvard University—I am utterly incapable of it. The conduct of that beloved and venerated Seminary is too refined and sublime for my dullness to comprehend. I presume not to censure any of its acts, though some...